Search results



Jeremiah T. Abiade

Email Address: jta@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 3049 ERF Phone: 312.355.2155
Webpage: http://www.mie.uic.edu/bin/view/MIE/ProfileAbiade
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The Laboratory for Oxide Research and Education (LORE) led by Dr. Abiade works on various aspects of thin film growth, processing and characterization. We are particularly interested in the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) growth of oxide thin films and multilayers for thermoelectric devices and other energy related research. We are also interested in oxides for electronic devices and oxide hydrophobic materials. In LORE, we are also heavily involved in the mentoring of individuals from diverse backgrounds. We view these activities as a synergistic component of the LORE misson.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should be self-motivated and willing to learn about various areas including those outside the realm of their regular course material.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students should be able to work well with other students in the research group and the principle investigator. The student would be expected to participate in group meetings and prepare summaries of their work as oral or written presentations.

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Charles K Abrams

Email Address: cabrams1@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine
Title: Visiting Professor
Phone: 55859
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The overarching theme of the work in my laboratory is the roles of connexins, proteins important in communication between cells, in the normal function of central and peripheral nervous system and in human disease. To this end we use cellular molecular and electrophysiological techniques to investigate the following areas:

1. Studies of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (an inherited disease affecting brain and peripheral nerves.

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of inherited disorders that predominantly or exclusively affect the peripheral nervous system. CMT1X, the X-linked form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, is associated with mutations in connexin 32 (Cx32), a gap junction protein expressed in Schwann cells (SCs). Over the last few years my laboratory has focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which CMTX mutations lead to peripheral neuropathy. Current investigations include in vivo studies using genetically altered mice expressing the mutant forms of Cx32 and DNA microarray studies to examine the effects of expression of WT vs. mutant forms of Cx32 on expression of other genes in virally infected SCs.

2. Studies of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher like disease, PMLD (a devastating brain disease) and related disorders.

Mutations in human CX47 cause either a mild disorder, (hereditary spastic paraparesis HSP) or a more severe one (Pelizaeus-Merzbacher like disease) Evaluation of Cx47 mutations that cause PMLD show that these mutations cause complete loss of function while the mutations causing HSP appears to lead to partial loss of function. In a primary oligodendrocyte culture system we have found that PMLD mutations appear to activate the UPR while HSP mutants do not. We are currently pursuing this finding to further examiner the role of the UPR in this disease. In addition we plan to use DNA microarray studies to examine the effects of expression of WT vs. mutant forms of Cx47 on expression of other genes.

3. Connexins in multiple sclerosis.

Because Cx32 and Cx47 seem to be required for myelin stability, we are currently examining the hypothesis that mice lacking either of these connexins may be more susceptible to demyelination. Preliminary experiments suggest that Cx47 knockout mice are more susceptible to Experimental Allergic Encephalitis (a model of multiple sclerosis) than are wild-type mice. We are pursuing this observation and are examining the possibility that this increased susceptibility is due to mitochondrial dysfunction in mice lacking either Cx32 or Cx47.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
All applications from students in good standing with strong motivation to work in a translational neuroscience laboratory will be considered. Ideally students should have completed at least biology, general chemistry and one semester of calculus by the time they enter the lab. A Math and Science GPA above 3.5 would be a plus. Strong physics and math background is a requirement for some projects in the lab (involving electrophysiologic recordings).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be expected to participate in the conduct of experiments under the guidance of more senior lab members. Like all members of the lab, the student will be expected to participate in laboratory maintenance relevant to his or her experiments. Attention to experimental details and accurate recording of procedures and results in a laboratory notebook are cornerstones of good science; the student will be expected to adhere to these principles.

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Steven Ackerman

Email Address: sackerma@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Title: Professor
Office: 1370 MBRB M/C 669 Phone: 9966149
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/com/bcmg/ackerman.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Transcriptional regulation of hematopoietic (blood cell) development and myeloid (eosinophil) lineage-specific gene expression; Molecular and structural biology (structure-function relationships) and biologic activities of eosinophil-derived mediators of inflammation and tissue damage in asthma, and allergic and parasitic diseases; Characterization of in utero/post-natal risk factors and mechanisms for the development of atopy and asthma. Eosinophil effector functions in inflammation and fibrosis; Clinical-translational studies on Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) including the development and validation of a novel minimally invasive diagnostic test, identification of disease-specific biomarkers, and clinical studies on the mechanisms of esophageal remodeling and fibrosis in EoE.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
Sophomore, junior, or senior standing; Biology, biochemistry or chemistry major; Demonstrated excellence in coursework and labs for major; Willing to work a minimum of 15 hour per week.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student would be expected to participate on ongoing studies, learn the necessary research techniques, perform experiments at the lab bench, and participate in weekly lab meetings and other lab-related activities by presenting research progress reports. Student will also be expected to perform routine tasks related to the day-to-day functioning of the laboratory.

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Guy Adami

Email Address: gadami@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 569F DENT M/C 838 Phone: 3129966251
Webpage: http://dentistry.uic.edu/depts/research/faculty/Adami_Guy.cfm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Oral cancer strikes 30,000 new patients each in the United States and most of these patients will die within 5 years. Early detection is key to survival from this disease. Our interests are in noninvasive swab based methods to detect and diagnose oral cancer based on gene expression. The goal is to prove that a miniature brush used to collect a few hundred cells from oral tissue will allow clinicians to diagnose this disease without a biopsy. We hope to have a kit that nurses, primary care physicians, dentists and hygienists can use to diagnose this disease within 5 years.

A second area of interest is the changes that occur in mice with aging and their causes; the identification of senescent cells in vivo and how to prevent their occurrence.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
No prerequisites except an interest in biological science and/or biotech.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Several areas of work are possible.

Gene expression analysis using brush samples involves several tasks that students can be involved with depending on their interest. This includes interacting with patients in the clinic and performing quantitative PCR to measure RNA levels (gene expression) along with gene expression analysis of thousands of genes at once using large scale cDNA sequencing.
There is a specific opportunity for a student that would like to be involved with computer based gene expression analysis using software designed to work with large number of genes and data at once.

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Naiche Adler

Email Address: naiche@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Physiology and Biophysics
Title: Scientific Director
Office: 2131 COMRB Phone: 67151
Webpage: http://physiology.uic.edu/faculty/index.html?fac=jankkitajewski&cat=active
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The Kitajewski laboratory studies the genetic pathways that control the formation of blood vessels, called sprouting angiogenesis. Our lab studies how new blood vessels form in normal, healthy contexts like retinal vessels in the back of the eye, and also how new blood vessels form in pathological contexts such as cancer.

We are currently exploring the role(s) of the Notch signaling pathway and Clic signaling pathway in sprouting angiogenesis. Our lab examines these processes using a variety of techniques. Depending on the experiment, we may introduce genetic mutations in mice, downregulate or overexpress genes in cells in tissue culture, sequence whole-genome mRNA, or assess protein activity via biochemical assays.

Work in the Kitajewski lab is highly collaborative and involves team efforts both within the lab and with external collaborators. We are committed to excellent science and training. Young scientists can expect to learn to perform techniques in angiogenesis and cell biology, collect and analyze data, and design presentations to communicate their results.

The Kitajewski lab is looking for motivated undergraduate students. Students will work with experienced lab members to develop a mentored project that contributes to overall lab research. If interested, please contact Dr. Naiche Adler, the scientific director for the Kitajewski lab, for further information.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred majors: Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Computer Science with an interest in bioinformatics. Honors College/GPPA students will be given priority.

We are looking for a student who is:
- Organized, reliable, timely
- Curious and willing to ask questions, also willing to find answers independently
- Rigorous about note-taking, including recording instructions and results
- Careful about following instructions exactly and with close attention to detail
- Willing to work with mice

Preference will be given to freshmen or sophomores who expect to continue work in our lab through multiple school years, or to juniors/seniors with previous lab experience. Those with previous lab experience should provide letters of reference.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Time commitment:

12-15 hours per week, with 3-5 hours per work day.

We will work with you to design a schedule that conforms to your classes. You will be expected to arrive promptly, reliably, and be committed to working during your scheduled hours.

Depending on budget, motivated students may be offered paid hourly work over the summer.

Training:

Initially, students will be expected to learn basic lab maintenance and support skills to contribute to overall running of the lab. Learning to work with lab mice will be required for most projects.

After an initial learning and evaluation period, you will consult with other lab personnel to select a project that complements your research interests and skills. With the help of a mentor, you will be expected to learn the scientific background of your project and be able to justify the experimental approach you are taking to solving the research question.

You will be expected to keep a notebook of the procedures that you learn and to accurately document and report all results. Some results may be unexpected! Students will be expected to present their research in periodic lab meetings and poster presentations. Exceptional students may be asked to present their results at seminars or meetings or to co-present with their mentors.

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Suresh K Aggarwal

Email Address: ska@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Title: Professor
Office: 2059 ERF M/C 251 Phone: 9962235
Webpage: http://www.mie.uic.edu/faculty/aggarwal.htm
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Combustion; Renewable Fuels and Energy; Computational fluid dynamics; Diesel sprays, combustion and emissions; Fluid Mechanics; Nanoflow Systems

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Completion of a project.

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Satish B. Alapati

Email Address: salapati@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Endodontics
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 3129962033 Phone: 3129962033
Webpage: https://dentistry.uic.edu/satish-alapati
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research is focused on Dental Tissue Regeneration/Engineering using stem cell and tissue engineering concepts. The core research: 1) the use of Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) on scaffolds for revascularization/regenerative procedures, 2) Scaffold design for drug/stem cell delivery, 3) Advanced Bioactive/Bioceramic materials in Dentistry

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10-12

Qualifications of a Student:
Interested students should:
• Students should be highly motivated.
• Be prepared for first few weeks that will be devoted to reading to gain sufficient background science.
• A GPA of 3.75 or higher is required.

*contact me for further details

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students should:
• Attend the weekly research meetings
• Be abled to maintain a weekly commitment along with their course work

*contact me for further details

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Leslie Aldrich

Email Address: aldrich@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Assistant Professor

Webpage: http://thealdrichlab.com
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Research in the Aldrich lab investigates complex biological phenomena using novel small-molecule probes derived from diversity-oriented synthesis. Our research interests span three major areas of chemical biology:

(1) Development of methods to access synthetic “unnatural product” scaffolds that are reminiscent of biologically active natural products.

(2) High-Throughput and High-Content Screening to identify small molecules that modulate complex biological pathways.

(3) Exploration of cellular processes that are important in human health using newly discovered small-molecule probes, with the ultimate goal of discovering novel therapeutic strategies for treating diseases.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.50/4.00
Prerequisite classes: Organic Chemistry I/II (for students interested in organic synthesis or medicinal chemistry)
General Biology I/II (for students interested in biochemistry or cell biology)
Preferred major: Chemistry or Biology
Year in College: Sophomore-Senior
No prior experience necessary outside of college classes/labs.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students in the Aldrich lab investigate topics at the interface of synthetic chemistry and biology with a focus on human health and disease. The highly interdisciplinary projects in our group enable trainees to develop expertise in synthetic organic chemistry, medicinal chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, cell biology, and chemical biology.

Individual student projects will focus on one or more of the above areas, depending on the student's interests. It is expected that students will be able to come to the lab at least 3-4 days of the week to have ample time to plan, execute, and complete experiments and to analyze collected data. If course schedules permit, students will also be expected to attend group meetings.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Aixa Alfonso

Email Address: aalfonso@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 3067 SEL M/C 067 Phone: 3550318
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Neuronal function; Neuronal development

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10-12

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of BIOS 220 (Genetics) or BIOS 222 (Cell Biology) is required. BIOS 286 (Biology of the Brain) or PSCH 262 (Physiological Psychology) is recommended.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students are expected to be reliable in their attendance to the laboratory, careful and consistent in recording their observations. If a student commits to doing research, they have to follow through in that commitment. A student has to commit to at least two semesters for a meaningful research experience. Students will read and discuss primary literature sources with Dr. Alfonso and the graduate students in the laboratory. A research paper is required for satisfactory performance.

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Susan Joan Altfeld

Email Address: saltfeld@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Community Health Sciences
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Office: SPHPI 1159 Phone: 355-1134
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Transitional Care for older adults
Safe sleep and other health promotion interventions for families with young children

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Some background and/or interest in community health, social science coursework

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student would assist with preparation of literature reviews, help prepare presentations for community and professional meetings, contribute to grant proposals and attend meetings with community agencies.
May have the opportunity to assist in the development of surveys and interview guides and to collect and analyze data.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Farid Amirouche

Email Address: amirouch@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Office: 2027 ERF M/C 251 Phone: 9963601
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/brl

Research Interest:
Biomechanics; Spine, joint and hip replacement; Dynamics and control of mechanical systems; Mechatronics; MEMS

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing

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Sushant Anand

Email Address: sushant@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 2025 ERF Phone: 3129963427
Webpage: https://anand.lab.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Water harvesting
Energy efficiency
nanomaterials
nanotechnology
drug delivery
Micro/Nanoscale heat transfer and fluid mechanics
Surface engineering

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.25
Years in college: 2

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Help the graduate students in building of experimental setups, perform CAD/CAM drawings, collect data

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Anjum Ansari

Email Address: ansari@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Physics
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: 2612 SES M/C 273 Phone: 9968735
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~ansari
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Protein-DNA Interactions and Kinetics of RNA Folding

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing; Knowledge of physical chemistry, biochemistry, and thermal physics; some experience with data analysis, preferably with MATLAB; some prior experience with biochemical sample preparation

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will assist in the characterization of the flexibility and thermodynamic stability of duplex DNA and how these properties depend on DNA sequence. The student will also help develop analysis programs, and will assist in data analysis of ongoing projects.

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S Elise Archias

Email Address: archias@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Art History
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 305 Phone: 530-566-6768
Webpage: http://artandarthistory.uic.edu/profiledetails/106/95
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Contemporary Art, 1960 to the present
Modern Art
Performance art
Dance
Feminism
Social Practice Art

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 1

Qualifications of a Student:
Anyone interested in art, ideas, or teaching qualifies!

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Research in library, online article databases, and Chicago museums & galleries; scanning; teaching prep support.

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Nick Ardinger

Email Address: ardinger@uic.edu
College: Other Department: Administration
Title: Assistant Director for Residential Education
Office: SRH 231 Phone: 5-6325
Webpage: housing.uic.edu
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
analyzing survey data, coding open-ended responses, conducting focus groups

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
Required:
Facility with Excel, Strong writing ability, Strong work ethic, Ability to work independently

Preferred:
Experience living in Campus Housing, Coursework in statistics, Facility with Microsoft Access/SPSS/etc., Experience coding qualitative data, Experience conducting focus groups

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Campus Housing regularly seeks feedback to determine how best to provide residents with an educational advantage. This student would analyze existing Housing assessment data sets, help to conduct focus groups, and write reports to make data most usable for Housing staff.

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Maria Argos

Email Address: argos@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Title: Associate Professor
Office: SPHPI 878A Phone: 312-355-1584
Webpage: http://apps.sph.uic.edu/FacultyProfile/FacultyProfile.aspx?UserName=argos
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
- Environmental, molecular, and chronic disease epidemiology
- Gene-environment interactions
- Arsenic epidemiology

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Not applicable. Students interested in gaining experience in public health and environmental epidemiology studies.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students are expected to participate in the coordination and implementation of ongoing population-based studies. This includes assisting with IRB, study protocols and questionnaires, study coordination, data entry, data cleaning, and basic data summarization.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Ozgur Arslan Ayaydin

Email Address: orslan@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Finance
Title: Clinical Associate Professor
Office: UH # 2129 Phone: (312)3550882
Webpage: http://business.uic.edu/faculty/ozgur-arslan-ayaydin
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Financial Policy, Capital and Ownership Structure, Capital Budgeting; Investment Policy, Corporate Governance, Corporate Payout Policy, International Financial Markets, Consumer Credit Risks, Energy Finance, Islamic Banking and Finance

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.0
Prerequisite Classes: FIN300, Introduction to Managerial Finance with a minimum grade of B.
Preferred Major: Finance or IDS
Prior Experience: None

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Analysis of firm-specific financial and accounting data through inspecting, cleaning, transforming, and modeling. This will not only enable the student to develop his/her technical skills but also help to describe facts, detect patterns,
develop explanations in corporate finance.

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Mary Virginia Ashley

Email Address: ashley@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 1031 SEL
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/malab/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research program involves using the genetic (DNA) variation to study ecological and evolutionary processes in nature. We are also interested in applying ecological genetics to issues in conservation biology and the management of threatened species, including genetic aspects of restorations and reintroductions.

Many plants balance their resources between floral (sexual) reproduction and clonal (asexual) reproduction. While clonal reproduction provides certain assurances and benefits to a specific individual (genet), it does not produce the genetic diversity of floral reproduction. Genetic diversity is a key component for a species to survive or to adapt to changes in the environment. Hence, while clonal reproduction may produce what appears to be a relatively large local population, if it is comprised of a single genetic individual, its lack of genetic diversity may threaten its long term persistence.

I am looking for students to assist in a project that will use DNA analysis to distinguish the genetic composition of individual plants (ramets) within populations in order to determine what factors can shift the balance between floral and clonal reproduction. One specific factor currently being studied is the effect of deer herbivory on forest understory plants. Deer browse understory plants at their flowering time, so the loss of flowers inhibits floral reproduction. Since the individual plant does not expend resources on producing fruits and seeds, there is a greater likelihood of the plant expending resources to produce a clone. In the extreme case, excessive clonal reproduction can lead to a loss of genetic diversity and threaten the viability of local populations or species.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Preference is for a biological sciences major with a gpa of 3.0 or better. Completion or enrollment in 230, 221, and some laboratory research experience is desirable but not required. Students will need to be able to spend several hours in the laboratory one or two days per week.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will learn in DNA extraction, PCR, genotyping, and data analysis. The objective of the study is to compare clonal structure in a woodland plant, bluebead lily, growing on Great Lakes Islands with and without deer.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Jennifer Ashton

Email Address: jashton@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1912 University Hall Phone: 312-413-2233
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/engl/people/prof/jashton/bio.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
American poetry, history of poetry, poetics, literary theory, aesthetic theory

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
Humanities or Arts majors preferred, but I am happy to work with anyone who is a capable library user and online researcher.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I am working on tracing some lines by the 19th-century American poet Walt Whitman that are quoted in an early 21st century novel (Ben Lerner's _10:04_). The lines in question appear in different places in different versions of Whitman's famous poem "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" but they are altogether missing from some versions of the poem, and there's one line in the quoted passage that may or may not be from Whitman. I'm looking for a student who'd be willing to track down and compare different versions of the poem using the Walt Whitman Archive (WWA) website. The work won't be difficult. Some of it will involve reading through different versions of the poem slowly and carefully. Some of it will involve searching variations of the quote's key phrases on the WWA website and checking the quote against the texts that turn up in the search. This might make a good supplemental Honors Activity for students in the Honors College, but I would welcome any student interested in learning more about Whitman and his poetry and thinking through questions of literary archiving and textual variants.

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Phimon Atsawasuwan

Email Address: patsawas@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Orthodontics
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 312-413-2651 Phone: 312-355-4798
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our lab is interested in the molecular biology aspect of bone biology and tooth movement. Tooth movement is a complicated process resulting from the signaling cascade from periodontal ligament relaying to osteoclast/blast which requires accurate spatial-temporal factors. Our lab's research aims to understand the molecular mechanisms of this process. Another ongoing project is involved a research in molecular mechanisms of bone biology using animal models and cell cultures.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Senior standing, biology major
Experiences in certain basic laboratory technics in molecular biology i.e. western blot, PCR.
Histological section, staining
Animal handling

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be able to handle a small project under the supervision of lab staff.
The student should be committed the assigned project.
The student would be recommended to present a poster presentation at a meeting if there is adequate budget.
The student should have high responsible and helpful personality.

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Gerard Awanou

Email Address: awanou@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
Title: Professor
Office: 1221 SEO Phone: (312)-413-21
Webpage: http://www.math.uic.edu/~awanou/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interests are in the numerical analysis of partial differential equations. I design and analyze algorithms for applications in science and engineering. More information is available on my website http://www.math.uic.edu/~awanou.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should have taken a class at the level of MATH 220: Differential equations.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student is expected to write a review on research on discrete isoperimetric inequalities. The classical isoperimetric inequality relates the length of a closed curve to the area of the region it encloses. I will meet with the student weekly to discuss the topic. Connections between isoperimetric inequalities, numerical analysis and differential equations have provided new avenues of research.

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Clara Awe

Email Address: awe@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Pharmacy Admin
Title: Associate Dean Diversity Affairs/Adjunct Assoc. Professor
Office: 176 PHARM M/C 874 Phone: 312-996-3516
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Research interests include pathways to pharmacy for underrepresented minorities, strategies for reduction of health disparities, cultural competence and educational outcomes of diversity in higher education, Race and gender epistemology/pedagogy, higher educational policy and the politics of Change social and behavioral science research

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Sophomore or junior standing,ability to learn how to do literature search, and highly motivated to learn.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Able to do library literature search, take initiative and not afraid to ask questions.

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Yolanda Xochitl Bada Garcia

Email Address: xbada@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Latin American and Latino Studies
Secondary Department: Sociology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1519 University Hall Phone: 3129969144
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/las/latamst/directory/bada.shtml
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My work intersects the study of Latino immigrant incorporation, international community development, transnational labor advocacy, and migrant civic engagement.
I am interested in an undergraduate student interested in helping me with data collection for a new project on Transnational Labor Advocacy in which I am collaborating with colleagues at the University of California, Santa Cruz:
This research will explore the following overarching questions: What are the main trends in the bilateral cooperation to enforce labor rights standards across different cities in the United States? What are the main opportunities and constraints that binational cooperation agreements on labor enforcement face for successful implementation at the local level? These questions will be explored through a combination of survey research in 50 cities and in depth case studies in two states (California and Illinois). The principal research strategy will involve coordination of survey data collection and interviewing key informants and representatives of civil society and Mexican and U.S. government agencies in order to identify best practices and differences in outreach models. Our research will focus on one of the clearest examples of transnational labor advocacy through diplomatic institutions: the role of the Mexican Consulate in supporting labor rights enforcement in the United States. Our interdisciplinary research team includes two U.S.-based scholars (sociologists Shannon Gleeson and Xóchitl Bada) and two Mexico-based scholars (anthropologist Tania Cruz and political scientist David Rocha), who bring expertise in the areas of migrant civil society, labor advocacy, and international relations.

This project will examine the importance of U.S.-based civil society for promoting a more active stance of labor enforcement agencies and evaluate the local implementation of the agreement between the Department of Labor (DOL) and Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Relations (SRE) to promote labor rights standards enforcement across 50 cities in the United States. We seek to demonstrate how labor unions and other worker centers have worked to hold U.S. labor standards enforcement agencies accountable by simultaneously pressuring the Mexican government to play a more pro-active role in advocating for the rights of its citizens in the U.S, specifically through their representation and involvement in the Institute of Mexicans Abroad (IME by its acronym in Spanish).

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
I don't have any special requirements but I would like to have a student interested in conducting face to face interviews and analyzing survey data. I prefer students with computing literacy skills including excel spreadsheets. Basic knowledge of SPSS is a plus but is not absolutely necessary. Students who are proficient in Spanish language would be ideal. Preferred majors are: Communication, Anthropology, Political Science, Sociology, Latin American and Latino Studies, Gender and Women Studies, History, and Economics.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I would like the student to attend labor rights workshops offered by several independent worker centers in the city, conduct interviews, perform transcriptions, and analyze the data he/she collects during the summer. The student will be able to design his/her own research project related to civic engagement in labor advocacy in Illinois and present preliminary results at the UIC undergraduate research forum.

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Srilata Bagchi

Email Address: sbagchi@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Center for Molecular Biology of Oral Disease
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 535B DENT M/C 860 Phone: 413-0683
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Cancer research;  Abnormalities in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human cancer. We also study the DNA damage and repair process to understand how faulty DNA repair contributes to malignancy. Two cancer models are used, HPV-associated cervical cancer and oral and head and neck cancer.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of coursework in biology and biochemistry; Willing to work 8 to 10 hours per week

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student should be committed to research and will be willing to work hard. Prior lab research experience is required for participation.

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Jane L Bagnall

Email Address: jbagnall@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Theatre and Music
Title: Resident Costume Designer/costume Shop Manager
Office: 312-413-8560
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Researching clothing styles of and creating costumes for theater productions to be performed on the departments main stage.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Knowledge of theater production & theater costume needs. Prefer a theatre major with sewing costumes experience

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will help researching clothing and style and then work to help build/find costumes of that time period for the production.

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Amy Kate Bailey

Email Address: akbailey@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Sociology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4140D Phone: 312-996-6559
Webpage: http://soc.uic.edu/sociology/people/faculty/amy-bailey
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Prof. Bailey's research focuses on historical patterns of racial violence in the American South, more commonly known as lynching. She is currently in the final stages of constructing a database using the census records of people who were publicly threatened with lynching, but not actually killed. This involves online archival research, shared decision-making, and documentation.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
No research experience is required -- in fact, this is a training position! Sociology majors or minors are highly preferred, as are history majors, students majoring in one of UIC's racial/ethnic studies departments, or undergraduates earning the social justice minor. Students who are juniors or seniors are also given high levels of consideration. The ability to read cursive is required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Note that members of the research team will be fully trained in all aspects of their responsibilities on the project.
• Use online genealogical website to search census manuscripts for individuals who were intended lynch victims, and record findings.
• Maintain electronic case files, for use by project members and in a public access website.
• Analyze results of other team members’ research, and make recommendations regarding possible matches.
• Enter data and collaborate with other project team members on data “cleaning.”
• Adhere to research protocol in all aspects of work.
• Fully document all aspects of research, including searching and case selection.
• Participate regularly in research-related discussions with colleagues/team members, including attending weekly meetings and communicating via email.
• Successfully meet project targets (ex: number of cases searched in a week).
• Other responsibilities may emerge over the course of the project.

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Kelly Bair

Email Address: kbair@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Architecture
Title: Assistant Professor of Architecture
Office: 310.346.7780 Phone: 310.346.7780
Webpage: http://cargocollective.com/centralstandard
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Our research philosophy hinges on an earnest belief that the dynamic forces that shape our physical environment are central influences to the design of our built environment. As designers, we give tactile form to the latent qualities of the matter that surrounds us. Our work employs physical forces {gravity, weight, pressure, temperature, and weather patterns} and urban dynamics {crowds, human interaction, built context} in an effort to elicit experiences that are as strange as they are familiar. Whether this process results in projects that take on forms and features reminiscent of the human body (figural objects) or adopt more elusive atmospheric qualities (difficult to define yet utterly visceral in their material effects) we strive to design architectural spaces that provoke human interaction and pique the curiosity of the collective mass.

Our design process is driven both by the conceptualization of ideas and the making of objects & spaces that act as accomplice to those ideas. Rooted in this mode of production is the mating of friendly robots {emmerging digital fabrication technologies} with our own two hands in an effort to achieve a symbiotic relationship between the technical precision of machines and the nuance of craft.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Min. GPA: 3.00
Preferred Major: Architecture/Design & The Arts
Year in College: 3+
Architecture/Design Experience: (physical/digital model building, Adobe Suite and 3d modeling skills such as Rhino preferred)

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student is expected to conduct guided research, format research findings in a the form of quality digital graphics (drawings and diagrams in Adobe Suite Programs), and develop that research in the form of design proposals (drawings and models).

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Fabricio E Balcazar

Email Address: fabricio@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Disability and Human Development
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Professor
Office: 442 DHSP M/C (626) Phone: 4131646
Webpage: http://ccbmdr.ahslabs.uic.edu/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Balcazar is currently the director of the Center on Capacity Building for Minorities with Disabilities Research. Dr. Balcazar's primary research interest is in developing effective strategies for enhancing consumer empowerment and personal effectiveness among individuals with disabilities.
I am currently conducting projects in the following areas: 1. Promoting entrepreneurship skills among youth and young adults with disabilities and help them developed their business plans and start up their small businesses. For more information see www.artfullygifted.org
2. Improving and promoting the successful transition of youth with disabilities graduating from high school, and
3. Developing and testing strategies to promote successful employment and other rehabilitation outcomes for individuals with disabilities in the state.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5 to 10

Qualifications of a Student:
All projects are open to students at any level -- freshman to senior.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Literature reviews, data collection, data entry and analysis. Willingness to go to community sites and support potential entrepreneurs. Assist with searches for grant opportunities for external collaborators.

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Andre A. Balla

Email Address: aballa@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pathology
Title: Professor of Pathology
Office: COMRB Room 6099 Phone: 312.413.5639
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcpt/faculty/balla.html
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Three main lines of research:some in cancer biology-environmental sciences and some in bioengineering/computer sciences:
1- Ten percent of the population have elevated body cadmium content from excess environmental exposure. Our laboratory has shown an association between cadmium overload and worse outcome in prostate cancer. We now use in vivo and in vitro models to study mechanisms of cadmium enhancement of tumors.
2- Besides the traditional microscope to make diagnosis of cancer and other diseases, physicians need to use new instruments to help in the practice of pathology. With the help of bioengineers, we are using Raman spectroscopy, infrared tissue microscopy, digital morphometry, fractal geometry and light interference microscopy to help making diagnostic and prognostic decisions.
3- Most funding for our Division of Transdisciplinary Pathology comes from helping numerous researchers on campus and other universities to achieve their research goals. We provide pathology diagnostic expertise,tissue bank samples, immunohistochemistry, tissue microarrays, digital imaging, etc.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: five

Qualifications of a Student:
It would be beneficial for both the project and the research assistant if he/she already possesses a firm background in biology, and in particular cell biology. Without such knowledge, it may be difficult for the student to completely comprehend not only the techniques used in the study, but also the implications of the proteins that are under scrutiny. Above all, the student should have an interest in scientific research and a desire to learn about the advancements in cancer research and treatment.
For the projects in bioengineering/bioimaging,programming and other computer skills are prefered but not essential.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Ability to work independently.
Ability to stick to a realistic schedule.
Lots of natural scientific curiosity and creativity.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Prashant Banerjee

Email Address: banerjee@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: 3029 ERF M/C 251 Phone: 9965599
Webpage: http://www.mie.uic.edu/faculty/banerjee.htm
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Industrial Virtual Reality
Surgical Simulation
Haptics

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Bioengineering or Computer Science major.

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Elena I Barengolts

Email Address: eibareng@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism; Department of Medicine
Secondary Department: Department of Medicine
Title: Professor of Medicine
Office: 612 CMW M/C 640 Phone: 9966060
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/com/dom/endo/index.htm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, PreDiabetes, Nutrition, Vitamin D. We have Multi-center Diabetes-related trials. The student can do an independent research if time-commitment is 2-3 years. No laboratory.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Computer literate. Honors college student preferred. Time commitment is the most important.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Come at least 2 times a week for 3-4 hours. To expect to be independent and understand that every step takes time. The actual work will be at VA Medical Center at 820 S. Damen (corner of Damen and Polk). A student would have to do Research training on requirements for Research in Human subjects and go through VA application process for volunteers. There may be interesting tasks (designing a questionnaire, obtaning consent, performing bioassay) and non-interesting tasks (bring subjects from VA to Clinical Research Center at UIC across the street). The student has to understand that every step in the study is important and has to be done with enthusiasm and best of ability.

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Natasha B. Barnes

Email Address: nbbarnes@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Secondary Department: African American Studies
Title: Associate Prof & Director of Undergraduate Studies in English
Office: UH 1933
Webpage: N/A
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Literary and cultural studies in the black Atlantic world. Deeply committed to using social media for educational and pedagogical purposes. I believe a public university should be accessible to the Chicago community. Taught an undergraduate course at Stateville Prison in 2014.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Student must have good standing in their department and be committed to the research in liberal arts. I would prefer a Junior or Senior but enthusiastic sophomores will be accepted

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student should be eager for independent work and willing to work in a team. Make sure you have arranged your schedule so that you can optimize your research experience

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Richard Barrett

Email Address: barrett@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Sociology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4051 BSB Phone: 7082077974

Research Interest:
Population, Epidemiology, Health Disparities, Chicago Community Areas and Neighborhoods, Cancer, Chinese and Mongolian Societies and Populations, Uses of Social Indicators from multiple sources.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Prefer students with some background in social science research methods and/or introductory statistics (and some ability to use Excel, SPSS, SAS or STATA).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Work on a research project (either an independent project with me or jointly with researchers from the Institute for Health Research and Policy, especially the Center for Population Health and Health Disparities; see http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/populationhealthcenters/cphhd/centers.html). Students will produce research reports or a final paper.

Students should be self-starters, be able to work as a junior member of a research team, and to meet deadlines.

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Amelia M. Bartholomew

Email Address: diveris@mac.com
College: Medicine Department: Surgery
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor and Chief, Translational Research
Office: 5113 COMRB Phone: 355-4065
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
This laboratory is focused on organ and tissue regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC)are rare residents of the bone marrow and other tissues which can give rise to a number of tissue types. More importantly, they have powerful regulatory properties and can direct cells to sites of injury for accelerated healing. We have three main lines of investigation: 1) the use of MSC on scaffolds to speed wound healing, 2) the use of MSC administered to modify the immune response to the transplanted organ to reduce or completely eliminate the need for anti-rejection drugs, and 3) the use of stem cell mixtures to regenerate kidney tissue.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Students interested in this type of inquiry should be highly motivated with the ability to attend to fine details. They should come prepared with the anticipation that the first few weeks will be devoted to reading literature so that they may become familiar with sufficient background science to meaningfully participate in the lab. A GPA of 3.75 or higher is required. This opportunity will be limited to first or second year students with the anticipation that it will be a 3-4 year commitment.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student is expected to attend the weekly research meetings, participate in journal club, and gain the necesssary skills to significantly contribute to at least one project. At the end of the experience, the student is expected to competently discuss the hypothesis, the methods used to test the hypothesis, and should have contributed significantly to a manuscript. This is a serious commitment and should be treated as another class with the requirement of outside reading as well as bench top skills. Students unable to maintain a weekly commitment will not be considered for renewed participation in subsequent years.


WE ARE NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THIS YEAR. THE NEXT PERIOD WILL BE FALL 2013.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Hormoz BassiriRad

Email Address: hormoz@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 4103 SEL M/C 066 Phone: 9968674
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Global warming and potential consequences for natural plant communities.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Working knowledge of plants; Knowledge of basic lab procedures, such as preparing solutions; Ability to commit for at least two semesters.

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Brian Bauer

Email Address: bsb@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Anthropology
Office: 2110A BSB M/C 027 Phone: 4133731
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/anth/faculty.html

Research Interest:
Archeology; South America

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Knowledge of Spanish

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Catherine Becker

Email Address: cathbeck@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Art History
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 211A Henry Hall Phone: 4136527386
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Having just completed my first book on Buddhist sculpture from the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, I am engaged in a new research project that examines the material remains of artistic and cultural exchange between Buddhist communities in Andhra Pradesh and Sri Lanka during the early centuries of the Common Era. Noting parallels between narrative sculptures from Andhra and episodes from the Pali vamsa literature, I propose that cross-cultural and cross-media comparisons (that is to say, comparisons of narrative relief sculptures from Andhra and texts from Sri Lanka) yield fruitful insights into the shared story-telling techniques employed by Buddhists in these regions. Moving beyond the scholarly debates over the creation of anthropomorphic representations of the Buddha, this project examines a broader corpus of relief sculpture in order to expand our understanding of how Buddhist communities in Sri Lanka and Andhra employed similar legitimizing strategies while also formulating distinct religious requirements for the adornment of sacred space and following uniquely local aesthetic sensibilities.

I have recently received a fellowship to undertake research in Sri Lanka, and I would be delighted to work with an undergraduate research assistant in preparation for this research trip.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Prospective student researchers should have taken at least one Art History course (in any area) and should have an interest in art, visual culture, South Asia, or Buddhism. The student researcher should also be highly motivated, intellectually curious, and excited by research in the humanities.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student researcher will be expected to help me compile an extensive bibliography, survey the body of literature on Buddhist art in Sri Lanka, and plan the trajectory of my research trip. This position will be excellent preparation for a student who is considering applying for graduate work in the humanities.

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Anakarina B. Bedran-Russo

Email Address: bedran@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Restorative Dentistry
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: UIC COD, rm 551 Phone: 312-413-9581
Webpage: http://dentistry.uic.edu/depts/resto/faculty/BedranRusso_Ana.cfm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Bedran-Russo's research interests include dentin hard tissue mechanical and biochemical properties, biomimetics to enhance tooth properties, cariology, and biomaterials-tooth interfaces.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Highly motivated and interested in lab based research in biomaterials sciences and dental tissue repair and regeneration.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
It is expected from the student a minimum of 12 hours of weekly lab work; the student will be mentored by a senior lab investigator and will assist on ongoing research projects.

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Judith Behnsen

Email Address: jbehnsen@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Microbiology and Immunology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: MSB E807 Phone: 312-413-1063
Webpage: https://sites.google.com/uic.edu/behnsen/home
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My laboratory studies the pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, which causes gastroenteritis in humans. We are particularly interested in the role of the bacterial and fungal microbiota during Salmonella pathogenesis. We use in vitro models like cell culture as well as small animal models to study how bacteria and fungi interact with each other, Salmonella, and the host. Next to conventionally raised mice we use mice that are devoid of any microbes (germ-free). We are the first lab to raise germ-free mice at UIC. One of the main advantages of these mice is that they can be selectively colonized with bacteria and fungi of interest. This allows us to understand relationships of these microbes and their interactions with the host in a less complex system.

Current research opportunities within our group include:
1) Elucidating the role of a Salmonella protease in the interaction with commensal fungi and the host
2) Characterizing the role of fungal siderophores during Salmonella pathogenesis

The Behnsen lab is a brand new lab at UIC. Motivated Undergraduate researchers contributed tremendously to Dr. Behnsen’s previous research at other institutions and were authors on multiple publications. We strive to establish a similar highly collaborative and dynamic group here at UIC, where Undergraduate researchers are part of the team, contribute significantly to research, and earn authorships on publications. We aim for scientific excellence and offer a stimulating and inclusive working environment conducive to learning and professional development.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
* Preferred majors: Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Bioengineering.

* Preferred coursework: Microbiology, Immunology, Molecular biology, Biochemistry

* Minimum GPA: 3.4

* Qualifications:
- Prior lab experience is not required but is a plus.
- Strong willingness to learn new techniques and not be afraid to work with mice.
- A successful candidate will follow directions precisely and pay close attention to details.

Honors College/GPPA students will be given priority.

Students who are motivated and have experience in our lab will become eligible to work half- or full-time during the summer as hourly paid employees.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
June 2018: We currently have an opening for a federal work study eligible student. Before applying please make sure you are FWS eligible.

----

We are looking for students who desire a long-term laboratory experience in preparation for admission into graduate school or medical school.

Time commitment:
We are expecting students to commit to working in the lab ~12 hours per week and to be able to be in the lab for periods of 3 to 5 hours per day on at least two consecutive days.

Classroom is the priority for a student. But we expect students to be at work on time and to devote work time to work tasks.


Sophomores: We are looking for students who are willing to commit to working in the lab for 2+ years, pending an initial evaluation period.

Juniors need prior research experience in specific research areas (e.g. standard molecular biology techniques like PCR and cloning, or working with mice).

* Training plan:
Initially, you will learn basic lab techniques and assist with routine maintenance of the lab. You will then choose a specific project to work on that is appropriate for your time commitment, skill set, and research interest.

We also expect candidates to enhance their experience by immersing themselves in the scientific background/literature relevant to the lab’s research. High-performing students may get the chance to present their research at seminars and meetings.

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Sanjay Behura

Email Address: sbehura1@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Visiting Research Assistant Professor
Office: CEB 202 Phone: 3124834590
Webpage: http://sanjaybehura.weebly.com/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Sanjay Behura is a Visiting Research Assistant Professor in Chemical Engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He majors in materials physics with primary focus on integrating low-dimensional nanomaterials including graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides to leverage the potential device functionality including nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy harvesting devices. The three important directions of my research are:

Advanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Growth of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Characterizations.

Two-Dimensional (2D) Materials-Based Emerging Photovoltaics.

Two-Dimensional (2D) Materials-Based Nanoelectronics.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 25

Qualifications of a Student:
Highly Motivated UG Students with Good GPA

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Should be regular in research work and motivated.

Ready to collaborate with other group members.

Should be open to new knowledge on the project topic and discussions with other group members and mentor.

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Carl Bell

Email Address: ccbell@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Secondary Department: School of Public Health
Title: Director Institute for Juvenile Research
Phone: 773 908 0076
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Prevention
Isolated Sleep Paralysis
Violence Prevention
HIV Prevention

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 1

Qualifications of a Student:

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
They need to know what they want to do and know how to do it.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Elizaveta V Benevolenskay

Email Address: evb@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: MBRB2320 Phone: 312-413-8947
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/com/bcmg/faculty/benevolenskaya_elizaveta.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
My long-term goal is to understand how biological regulatory networks are changed in cancers to develop new treatments and cures for these diseases. My laboratory works on proteins that generate highly specific chemical modifications in the genome, defining the highest level of gene regulation, epigenetics. Some of such enzymes have been associated with human malignancies. However, biological function of epigenetic regulators and in vivo mechanisms targeting them to specific genomic sites in normal and diseased conditions are very poorly defined. We developed several cell culture-based models to study epigenetic regulators responsible for methylation of lysines 4 and 27 in histone H3. We are doing research on their interaction with established tumor suppressors, such as pRB, and trying to identify target genes associated with particular biological function (Lopez-Bigas et al., 2008; Lin et al., 2011; Ambrus et al., 2013; submitted manuscripts). Using knockdown and knockout techniques allows us to reveal relevance of epigenetic regulators to cell growth and put them in biological regulatory networks. My group is publishing extensively on the application of genome location analysis (Beshiri et al., 2010; Islam et al., 2011a and b; Jene-Sanz et al., 2013). The expected low costs for next-generation sequencing-based characterization puts personalized diagnostics in the near future. By visiting my laboratory, students from UIC and other schools get hands-on knowledge of using human genome data. One of the directions of my research is to apply integrative analysis of multidimensional oncogenomic data that will allow us to achieve a better understanding of cancer alterations in epigenetic modules from a global perspective.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in biology or chemistry, high motivation to do research.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
In the initial phase, the student will receive training from one of the researchers in the lab. The student then will be given some tasks in frames of a particular scientific project. Finally, the student will be fully responsible for a small project that contributes to the lab research effort. The methods associated with projects vary but almost every project will include cell culture work and quantitation of gene expression or transcription factor binding by PCR.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Larry Bennett

Email Address: lwbenn@uic.edu
College: Social Work Department: Jane Addams Social Work
Title: Professor
Office: 4440 EPASW M/C 309 Phone: 9964577
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/jaddams/college/faculty_staff/faculty/bennett.html

Research Interest:
Domestic violence; Interventions (legal and psychosocial) and their effectiveness in preventing domestic violence; Domestic violence and addictions

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Computer literacy a must; Statistical analysis a plus; Volunteer or paid experience in domestic violence and/or addictions a plus

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Natalie Dione Antoinette Bennett

Email Address: ndab1@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Gender and Women's Studies
Secondary Department: African American Studies
Title: Assistant Director
Office: 1200 University Hall Phone: 312-996-4542
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Gender and Sexuality in the African diaspora; Childhood in Jamaica; Gender, Sexuality and Immigration; Community-based Education

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
* Student should be interested in or taken courses in Gender & Women's Studies, Latin American Studies, Sociology, History, English, African American Studies, and/or Education.

* Good writing skills; some research experience and ability to work with both quantitative and quantitative data would be helpful.

* Junior or Senior standing preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will assist with gathering research materials, creating bibliographies and organizing data for new project(s). Student will be expected to meet with me to review and discuss tasks related to project (at least once every 2 weeks).

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Erin Berenz

Email Address: eberenz@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Psychology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: BSB 1062A Phone: 312-355-0808
Webpage: https://chatlab.wixsite.com/uichicago
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Clinical Psychology; Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; Addiction

My research is focused on understanding risk for posttraumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorder, particularly among individuals who have been exposed to sexual or physical assault. Ongoing studies include human laboratory studies and treatment-outcome research.

Specifically, we are focused on understanding which trauma-exposed individuals are most likely to use alcohol as a coping mechanism. For example, we examine links between individuals' trauma memories and craving for alcohol in the laboratory.

We also are collaborating with the Gateway Foundation to study predictors of better treatment outcome among adults receiving treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorder in the residential rehabilitation setting.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3 credit hours (8-9 work hours)

Qualifications of a Student:
Students who are the best fit for our lab are dedicated, serious about learning about clinical psychology, hard-working, and detail-oriented. We also require a high level of interpersonal sensitivity, given that our research participants discuss difficult topics (e.g., traumatic experiences) in the laboratory.

A minimum GPA of 3.0 is required. Psychology majors who are considering pursuing graduate training in psychology will be given priority. We also require a one-year commitment in the lab, given the time and energy we place into training undergraduate students.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Primary responsibilities will include helping to recruit and screen potential research participants, data entry and management, literature searches, and attending weekly laboratory meetings. You will work with other students, including graduate students, under my supervision.

Students who show a high level of responsibility and professionalism will have the opportunity to receive training to run participants through laboratory protocols. We value providing students with a high quality experience in the lab and supporting them in exploring options for graduate school in psychology.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Tanya Yonit Berger-Wolf

Email Address: tanyabw@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: 1136 SEO M/C 152 Phone: 4138719
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/~tanyabw
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Computational ecology, at its unique intersection of computer science, wildlife biology, and social sciences.Particularly in creating computational solutions to help answer biological questions of why do social animals (including humans) do what they do: from computer vision to identify individual animals in photos to social network analysis for understanding how leaders emerge and affect group decisions

Two specific project:
* Wildbook: a cloud-based system that starts from crowdsourced images and, using machine learning, computer vision, and data science, transforms them into information about animals. (wildbook.org)

* Using sensor systems and network analysis to track, identify, and understand individual, pairwise, or group level behavior.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
At least one of the following (but not necessarily exclusively):
* theoretical computer science background or mathematical combinatorial background
* good programming skills in Python
* good programming skills in Java or C or C++ and ability to evaluate different existing software to incorporate and modify it.
* ability to understand existing computational methods and interface with scientists from other disciplines

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Louis S Bergonzi

Email Address: bergonzi@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Theatre and Music
Secondary Department: Educational Policy Studies
Title: Professor, Head of Music
Office: L034 Phone: 6-8686
Webpage: http://theatreandmusic.uic.edu/directory/louis-bergonzi-head-music
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Looking for a student assistant in for one of the following projects:

(1) Orchestral Music Event Production and Evaluation

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: .

Qualifications of a Student:
(1) Membership in UIC Orchestra required, but student does not necessarily have to be a music major or minor. Be in at least Year 2 of collegiate study required, with business or music business background preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
(1) Assist in all aspects of concert event production including marketing, including but not limited to social media; development of marketing survey for UIC Orchestra audiences; personnel management.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Max Berkelhammer

Email Address: berkelha@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Earth and Environmental Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: x38271
Webpage: http://earth.usc.edu/~berkelha/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research involves studies of climate change with a focus on water and carbon cycle processes. The research involves a combination of field measurements, lab analysis and numerical modeling. The projects tend to utilize tracers to study the pathway of water and carbon through different ecosystems. Current projects involve research on the interactions between the Greenland ice sheet and atmosphere, forest-atmosphere interactions in the Rocky Mountains, carbon and water use in grassland and agricultural ecosystems.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Experience with Excel, Matlab or other software for processing data.
Experience working in a lab either through Chemistry class or from working with another researcher.
Commitment to provide a consistent number of hours per week (such as 8).
A GPA greater than 2.8 in Science/Engineering/Mat classes.
Majoring in Science or Engineering.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
As an example: the student is expected to prepare water samples from a Greenland ice core for isotopic analysis. This involves pipetting of water, careful documentation of the sample and loading it into a laser absorption spectrometer for isotopic analysis. Following completion of the analysis the student will quality check the data and begin analysis on the climatic significance o the analysis such as by comparison their record to meteorological data.

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Vikas Berry

Email Address: vikasb@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Associate Professor

Webpage: http://vikasb.people.uic.edu/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We study the electrical, structural, and chemical properties of innovatively designed nano- and bio- materials to enable the development of the next-generation applications in biomedicine, electronics and nanomechanics. We investigate the fundamental science behind the biological and the nanoscale phenomena to rationally integrate them to develop high functionality/sensitivity nanotechnologies. My research areas of interest are:
(a) Graphene Science and Technology
(b) Bio/Nano Interfaces and BioNanoTechnologies
(c) Novel Atomically-Thick Nanomaterials

(A) Graphene Science and Technology: Isolated from graphite for the first time in 2004, graphene is a "single atom thick" sheet of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. We modify its chemical and structural attributes to control its properties for applications in ultrafast FETs, single-bacterial/DNA detector,making cells impermeable, and single molecule detector.

(B) Bio/Nano Interfaces: Hybrid systems built at the interface between bio- and nano-technologies leverage the hierarchical chemical-specificity in biology, and the unique quantum mechanical effects in nanomaterials. The combined characteristics of the bio/nano systems enable higher-order functionality, including bio-molecular mechanics, bio-sensing, bio-molecular electronics, physical phenomenon sensing using biological reactions, and biocomposites.


(C) Novel Atomic-Thick Nanomaterials: My group has been working on synthesizing and studying the properties of several (next-generation) atomically-thick nano-materials. We have developed a process for the exfoliation of single-atom-thick sheets of Boron Nitride (BN) via lattice protonation and are studying the surface-sensitivity of Molybdenum Disulphide (MoS2) monolayers (3 atoms thick).

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 16

Qualifications of a Student:
Motivated to conduct ground-breaking experiments and learn state-of-the-art nanotechnology tools.

Minimum GPA = 3.3
Preferred majors: Chemical, Materials, Electrical, or Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, Physics

Honors College students preferred

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Learn nanotechnology tools and conduct research on a current project on graphene, bionanotechnology or 2D Nanomaterials.

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Tapan Bhattacharyya

Email Address: tbhatt@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Secondary Department: Biomedical Science
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: EEI, B 10, Bldg 902 Phone: 996-6509
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Photoaging of Skin induced by UV exposures as evaluated by histologic and immunohistochemical criteria,and reversal of such damage with topical anti-aging agents. Intrinsic aging of skin in animal models.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Biology honors.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Dedication and seriousness to learn new areas of research. Some experience in histology preferred.

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Angela Black

Email Address: arblack1@illinois.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Department of Kinesiology and Community Health
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 217-333-2703
Webpage: http://kch.illinois.edu/Research/Labs/WomensHealthCollective/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
**faculty member has primary appointment on the Urbana campus with research studies in Chicago**

African American women's health disparities
Preventive health care of women
Gendered and cultural health behaviors
Stress-health pathways

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Required:
Junior or Senior Standing
3.3 GPA
Experience with engaging diverse populations-- in terms of race, sexuality, religion, socioeconomic status, etc
Institutional Research Board training (by time of hire)
Sociology, Gender/Women's Studies; Social Work, Psychology, Public Health, Nursing, or African American Studies major; other Health disciplines encouraged

Preferred:
Experience/interest in health disparities of African American women
Experience/interest in learning interview techniques
Experience/interest in understanding barriers to preventive health care for African American women

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will be expected to show up to partnering clinic (on-campus) during set dates/hours each week. Student will need to wait in the reception area until partnering physician indicates that she has a patient that may be interested in participating in the study. Student will then sit with patient in a private room and interview her based on approved interview guide.

ALL students will be required to complete IRB-training by time of hire and complete in-person interview and in-person training (in Chicago) with the faculty member.

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Judy Bolton

Email Address: judyb@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Office: 505B PHARM M/C 781 Phone: 9965280

Research Interest:
Carcinogenic and/or toxic effects elicited by various drugs, environmental chemicals, and dietary constituents

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Laboratory experience in chemistry or biochemistry highly desirable

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Jerry Bona

Email Address: jbona@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
Title: Professor
Office: SEO 1206 Phone: 312-4132567
Webpage: http://www.math.uic.edu/~bona
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
My primary research interests are in fluid mechanics, oceanography and the associated partial differential equations. I also work in numerical analysis and have some experience in economic theory and mathematical biology.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Knowledge of differential equations and some experience working in MATLAB or similar software. Familiarity with elementary numerical analysis would also be helpful.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Helping to improve a model of nearshore zone wave-bottom interaction. This will involve modeling, building a numerical scheme for the model, testing the scheme and then using the code to make predictions of sand bar movement.

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Courtney Marie Bonam

Email Address: cbonam@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Psychology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1062A Phone: 312.355.0808
Webpage: http://uic.academia.edu/CourtneyBonam
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
social psychology; group processes and intergroup relations; social identity threat and social stigma; racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination; sense of place, environmental and social justice; perceptions and experiences of multiracial people

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred major: Psychology or another social science.

Prerequisites: PSCH 100 Introduction to Psychology & PSCH 242 Introduction to Research in Psychology. No other prerequisite classes are necessary, but it will be helpful to have taken courses related to race, ethnicity, culture, and/or social justice issues more broadly.

Students interested in eventually pursuing an honors capstone project and/or attending graduate school in psychology (or a related social science) are especially encouraged to apply.

Preference will be given to students who can make a two semester commitment.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
All students will attend bi-weekly research lab meetings and will meet individually with their project leader as needed. Student research participation will include any number of the following tasks: administering surveys/experimental protocol and data collection; participant recruitment; data entry, preparation, and basic analyses; literature searches; helping to develop research study materials, surveys, and other stimuli.

Preference will be given to students who are able/willing to register for PSCH 396 during at least their first semester with the lab, which requires a final report (due the last day of class) describing the research project you assisted with and the theory behind it. Beyond your first semester, you may choose to repeat PSCH 396, volunteer your time in lab, or enroll in PSCH 397 Readings in Psychology (which requires a longer paper and successful prior completion of PSCH 343). Students qualifying for federal work study also have an opportunity to be paid via the Chancellor Undergraduate Research Awards program.

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis.

Apply by midnight on the 1st SUNDAY of each term for full consideration.

APPLY HERE

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Ernesto Bongarzone

Email Address: ebongarz@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Title: Professor
Office: COMRB 9073 Phone: 66894
Webpage: http://bongarzone.anat.uic.edu/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
I have a long-standing interest in the neurobiology of myelination. Myelin is the sheath of apposed membranes that wraps and electrically insulates axons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Numerous conditions including multiple sclerosis, genetic leukodystrophies, neurodegenerative pathologies, aging and intoxications increase myelin vulnerability, leading to disease, which remains largely incurable. The long-term goal of my research program is to translate our detailed understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of disease into rationalized therapies to cure demyelination. In particular, my laboratory is interested on:

1) Synergy therapies for genetic leukodystrophies. Demyelinating lysosomal storage orphan diseases such as Krabbe disease (deficiency of Galactosylceramidase) or metachromatic disease (MLD, deficiency of arylsulfatase A) are currently very difficult to treat. Early therapeutic studies performed on mouse models for Krabbe disease and MLD indicated the relevance that the disease phenotype exerts on the outcome of a therapy. Mutant mice with a milder neurological phenotype such as the MLD mice responded positively to gene and cell therapies (Luca et al., 2005; Givogri et al., 2006; Givogri et al., 2008). In contrast, these therapies failed in the severe twitcher mouse, a model for Krabbe disease (Dolcetta et al., 2004; Galbiati et al., 2005; Galbiati et al., 2009). Further experimentation from my laboratory demonstrated the complexity of Krabbe disease, becoming evident that this leukodystrophy is compounded with various additional pathogenic mechanisms, most of them driven by the toxicity of psychosine (the material that is stored in Krabbe disease). With federal and private funding, we are investigating an array of basic cell biology questions including how psychosine affects membrane biogenesis and lipid rafts, axonal cytoskeleton, vesicular axonal transport and neuromuscular junction (White et al., 2009; White et al., 2010; Cantuti et al., 2011, 2012, 2013; Smith et al., 2012; Smith et al., 2014). With these findings, it became obvious that single therapies would fail to cure Krabbe disease. Departing from a better understanding of Krabbe’s pathogenesis, my lab is interested in determining the benefits of combining gene therapy, cell therapy and targeted neuropharmacology. We are interested in determining the best synergic therapies for Krabbe disease resulting from combining different routes of delivery, vectors (adeno-associated viral or lentiviral vectors), donor cells (bone marrow, neural stem cells) and drugs (inhibitors for kinases, phosphatases and neuroprotectors). As a result from this effort, my lab is heavily involved with the Krabbe Translational Research Network, a private consortium grouping most of the labs working on Krabbe disease in US. Teamwork with components of this network have consolidated the design and current discussion with federal authorities for a phase I clinical trial for Krabbe disease.

2) Mechanisms of axonopathy in myelin diseases. It is clear that neuropathology in most myelin diseases involves not only damage to myelin and oligodendrocytes but also to axons and neurons. Our findings in genetic leukodystrophies are examples of how relevant these two neuropathological aspects are at the moment of formulating a therapy. However, the mechanisms of axonal/neuronal degeneration during demyelination in other important myelin diseases such as multiple sclerosis remain vastly uncharacterized. This gap of information feeds our current interest in studying the regulation of fast axonal transport during myelin disease. Vesicular transport is a physiological process vital for the survival of the axon and the neuron. Axons are very long structures connecting the neuronal soma to their targets, which may reside several centimeters away. Even small reductions of vesicular transport efficiency could be detrimental and cause neuronal disease. For example, the activity of neuromuscular junctions relies upon nerve connections with very long axons, sometimes a meter or more long. If the transport and/or release of synaptic vesicles containing acetylcholine is reduced only by 5-10%, this translates in slower muscle responses to many muscle fibers, impacting on the efficiency of muscle contraction for the patient, a feature present in all myelin diseases. With funding support from NIH, we are studying how pharmacological intervention may protect and ameliorate neurodegeneration in some myelin diseases. Using animal models we have identified various signaling pathways that appear to directly affect axonal transport of vesicles and the stability of the neuron-axon-target axis (Cantuti et al., 2011; Cantuti et al., 2012; Cantuti et al., 2013). My interest is to expand our results to other relevant signaling pathways and diseases and determine how transport deregulation occurs during demyelination and responds to remyelination. Ultimately, these studies will formulate new synergic therapies combining metabolic correction and neuropharmacology to preserve the health of the affected neurons in myelin diseases.

3) Cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating remyelination in disease and aging. My interest to positively treat myelin diseases is complemented with work on remyelination. The demonstration of de novo generation of neural cells (neurogliogenesis) in the adult brain and the presence of adult oligodendrocyte progenitors throughout the CNS provide a unique possibility to study the in vivo behavior and responses of these cells to disease and to identify molecular targets for therapy. Currently, we are characterizing the response of endogenous brain progenitors to viral infection. Our studies use the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus and have identified virus-mediated signaling pathways affecting oligodendrocytes differently than other neural cells such as astrocytes or neurons (Hebert et al., in submission). In addition, specific micro-RNA responses apparently involved in decreased remyelination have been identified. We are interested in evaluating potential benefits of interfering with micro-RNAs to enhance myelin repair.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Priority is given primarily to Biology/Chemistry majors with top GPAs (>3.5). Freshman and sophomores pursuing Medical/Graduate school are particularly encouraged to apply. Prior research experience is an advantage but not necessary. The applicant should be able to quickly learn and master new techniques, have excellent communication and team-work skills, be mature, reliable and highly organized with lab notes, working hours and general activities within the lab. Candidate must be able to devote at least 15 hours/week in chunks of 3-5 hours.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Candidates shall expect a social tranquil and highly interactive lab environment. Students will be exposed to senior researchers who are prone to share their talents and knowledge. Students are expected to learn from them, being able to follow protocols and techniques with precision, developing multi-tasking and problem solving skills. Open communication is expected at all times regarding time-off, exams, vacations, etc. Lab time is expected to be devoted to lab activities only. Students should expect to start a training period where they will be under the supervision of a senior technician to learn general lab duties and techniques. After this period and with evidence of gained precision, commitment and trouble-shooting skills, students are expected to become fully embedded in a particular project under the direction of a project leader. We seek students who may remain during junior and senior years fully engaged in an Honors study.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Gloria Bonner

Email Address: gjbonner@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Medical-Surgical Nursing
Office: 650 NURS M/C 802 Phone: 9960066

Research Interest:
End-of-life issues: quality at the end of life, factors influencing end-of-life treatment decisions

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Health, behavioral, or social science background

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Bette Bottoms

Email Address: bbottoms@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Psychology
Title: Professor
Office: 1062C Behavioral Sciences Bldg. Phone: 312-413-2300
Webpage: http://psch.uic.edu/psychology/people/faculty/bette-bottoms
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Social psychology; Psychology and law (children's eyewitness testimony, jury decision-making)

The issues I study lie at the interface of psychology and law. Much of the motivation for my research stems from my concern for justice and the welfare of adults and children, yet my research is driven by a desire to test basic psychological theories.

I conduct laboratory experiments as well as survey studies in three related areas: (1) How children's memory and suggestibility are affected by social and emotional factors (e.g., stress, motivation to conceal information, prior victimization). (2) Case, victim, defendant, and juror characteristics that influence jurors' decisions in cases in which children are victims or juvenile offenders (e.g., race, stereotypes, gender, empathy for and attitudes toward child victims). (3) Disclosure of child abuse. Are adults' memories of childhood abuse subject to repression or distortion through suggestion?

Before applying, please read all the information here carefully and visit all the links about the laboratory accessible from http://psch.uic.edu/psychology/people/faculty/bette-bottoms

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3 credit hours (8-9 work hours)

Qualifications of a Student:
My graduate students and I love working with undergraduates who are curious, flexible, committed, serious, hard-working, and who want to learn about research in the field of psychology, law, and/or criminal justice. You'll need to have a GPA of at least 3.0 in your last year or so, and it is helpful if you have basic training in research (such as a course like PSCH 242 or work in another lab).

Past undergraduate research assistants have gone on to great graduate schools and careers.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You'll join an active laboratory with other undergraduate and graduate research assistants under my supervision. You would assist with research that is related to psychology, law, criminal justice, and children. You'll be expected to participate in various aspects of the work and to attend bi-weekly lab meetings. You might help to conduct experimental sessions, prepare materials for sessions, enter data using SPSS, check data that has been entered, search and summarize literature, file materials, transcribe and code transcripts from jury deliberations, etc. These are skills any researcher in the field of Psychology and Law (and other fields) needs to have. We train you for all tasks -- don't worry about learning how to do these things.

This experience will allow you to understand what research in psychology is all about, and help you decide whether you might like to pursue it later in your career. If research is for you, then this experience will help prepare you for graduate school in any discipline involving research (especially psychology, law, and criminal justice), but even if you aren't interested in graduate school, you will learn many generalizable skills and meet other researchers who can give you valuable advice.

If we don't need someone now, we will save your application for next semester.

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Badi Boulos

Email Address: bmboulos@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Office: 106 SPHW M/C 922 Phone: 9960803
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/spha/

Research Interest:
In-vitro culture placental transfer of compounds; Industrial and Environmental toxicology; Occupational health hazards carcinogenesis

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Biochemistry or Biological Science major; Ability to work on computer searches

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Andrew Boyd

Email Address: boyda@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Biomed and Health Info Sciences
Secondary Department: Medical Education
Title: Assitant Professor
Office: 227 AHS Phone: 68339
Webpage: http://tigger.uic.edu/~boyda
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Data simplification to improve clinical care. I work in the field of biomedical and health informatics. The research projects I work on try to address the increasing problem of the increase in data in the field of medicine and how to visualize the data to allow clinicians and patients to understand wellness and disease.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Majors of Interest: Health Information Management, New Media Arts, Studio Arts, Computer Science, Pre-Med, Pre-Dentistry, Pre-health sciences. GPA 3.0 or above. Working knowledge of computers.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
A highly motivated student who is willing to learn additional information to address interdisciplinary research challenges. Must be willing to undergo Human Subject Training. Research is conducted on the west side of campus. Demonstrate the ability to think analytically and think creatively.

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Christopher Boyer

Email Address: crboyer@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: History
Secondary Department: Latin American and Latino Studies
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1021 University Hall Phone: 708-269-4133
Webpage: http://tigger.uic.edu/~crboyer/Home.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
History of Modern Mexico
Environmental History (especially Mexico)
Latin American Studies
Environmental Studies

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
Knowledge of Spanish required

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Search Chicago area libraries for primary documents related to the Latin American wars of independence for use in the classroom context.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Scott Brady

Email Address: stbrady@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Title: Professor and Head Anatomy and Cell Biology
Office: 578 CME M/C Phone: 9966791
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcan/

Research Interest:
Our research addresses four areas: 1) Molecular Mechanisms of Axonal Transport analyzing the cell and molecular biology of kinesins in the nervous system; 2) Specialization of the Neuronal Cytoskeleton focusing on posttranslational modifications and transport mechanisms for cytoskeletal proteins in the neuron; 3) Glial Modulation of Neuronal Function examining the effects that myelination has on neuronal structure and function; and 4) Effects of Physiological Stress on Neurons evaluating the changes in cytoskeletal and synaptic proteins and structures in response to chronic glucocorticoid stress.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Completed sophomore year; Taken a course in at least one and preferably tow of the following areas: neuroscience, cell biology, biochemistry or molecular biology.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student should be willing to make a sustained commitment with a regular schedule during the school year. Summer research options are only available to students that have been involved during the academic year. Students interested in a multiyear experience are preferred.

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Carol Braunschweig

Email Address: braunsch@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Kinesiology and Nutrition
Secondary Department: Human Nutrition
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1919 w. taylor Phone: 3129962575
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Primary research interests are centered on :
1. Assessment of how nutritional intake and non-volitional nutritional support (parenteral and enteral feedings) impact overall risks and clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients;
2. The impact of obesity and body composition on disease risks in various populations including women, the disabled and minority populations and
3. The design, implementation and assessment of exercise and nutrition interventions for obesity prevention and treatment.

My lab is focused primarily on translational research that combines the foundations from basic nutrition research and human clinical trials in an effort to answer questions of how obesity, body composition, insulin resistance and inflammation influence disease risks and health outcomes. These investigations involve a variety of high risk populations including critically ill adults exposed to non-volitional feeding (enteral and parenteral nutrition), morbidly obese individuals undergoing gastric bypass surgery, men with spinal cord injury and obese children. Epidemiologic principles are employed to assess the dietary intake and nutritional status of a population and explore the relationships between these nutritional exposures and illness.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
GPA of >3.3, jr status in nutrition program

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
willingness to work with participants in various studies. Efforts will include recruitment, nutritional assessment, dietary assessment, data collection, data entry and cleaning. Working with PhD students in my lab assisting with their dissertation research

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Kenneth Brezinsky

Email Address: kenbrez@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Office: 123 CEB M/C 110 Phone: 9969430
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/chme/prof/brezinsky.htm

Research Interest:
Combustion Engineering

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Shelley Brickson

Email Address: brickson@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Managerial Studies
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: UH 2230 Phone: 312 996 9861
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/cba/cba-depts/ms/FacultyProfiles/brickson.html
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My departmental affiliation is with the Business School. My research applies social psychology and sociology to address organizational issues. Some of my main interests are:

Business and society
Diversity (race, gender, etc)
Identity
Organizational identification
Relationships

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
GPA 3.5
Some coursework in psychology a bonus, but not required.
Interest in societal issues
Critical thinking
Motivation
Honors College a plus, but not required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
There could be some literature review, article data base construction, qualitative data coding, etc.

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Jennifer Brier

Email Address: jbrier@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Gender and Women's Studies
Secondary Department: History
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1228UH Phone: 3-2458
Webpage: http://historymoves.org
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am currently leading a team of faculty and students (LAS and CADA) in a project to develop a mobile, community-based public history gallery. History Moves, as we call the project, works with neighborhood and community-based groups to develop their own historical sensibility through oral history and analysis of material culture. We then will work together to curate and produce a small history exhibition based on the findings (at first the exhibition will be online, but we hope to actually develop a plan to purchase and retrofit a bus or truck as a mobile and modular gallery).

Our first community collaboration, in Spring 2012, was with the Immigrant Youth Justice League, we then worked with the Chicago Freedom School. Undergraduate researchers will need to be available to meet with the organization and the team on a regular basis.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
My researchers need to be well versed in the work of either feminism or social justice or both. I also would prefer a student who feels comfortable doing research in a range of humanist/social scientific disciplines. Creativity is a skill I also need in a student.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I enjoy working with students who are engaged in critical thinking and interested in pushing themselves (and me) in new directions. For this project, I would like to work with students who are interested in pushing the boundaries of what public history can and should look like as well as students who are interested in doing community-based work.

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David Brown

Email Address: dpb@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Architecture
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 3100 Architecture & the Arts Building Phone: 312.996.3335
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
architecture / situations and dynamics of the metropolitan field

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
3rd or 4th year student in architecture

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will assist in the study, documentation, mapping, and interpretation of past Chicago architecture in relation to contemporary ideas within the discourse. Facility with AutoCAD, Illustrator, and Photoshop is necessary.

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Karol Bruzik

Email Address: kbruzik@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Office: 593 PHARM M/C 781 Phone: 9964576
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~kbruzik/kbruzik.htm

Research Interest:
Synthesis of biophosphates and analogs; Synthesis of phosphoinositides; Mechanistic enzymology; Structure of model biomembranes

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of one year of organic chemistry with labs and one year of biochemistry; Good manual dexterity

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Howard Buhse

Email Address: spasmin@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Office: 4100 SEL M/C 066 Phone: 9962997

Research Interest:
Development, biochemistry, and molecular biology of the ciliate, Vorticella convallaria

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior standing or completion of chemistry

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Joanna E Burdette

Email Address: joannab@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Secondary Department: Biopharmaceutical Sciences
Title: Associate Professor/Associate Dean for Research
Office: MBRB 3202 Phone: 6-6153
Webpage: http://tigger.uic.edu/~joannab/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
1) ovarian cancer

2) imaging steroid receptors using magnetic resonance imaging

3) natural products drug discovery

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred honors college capstone project students

Preferred biology major

Minimum of introductory biology

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students are expected to participate in lab experiments and contribute to the maintenance of the lab environment. Each student is paired with a mentor and allowed to investigate a specific research question. Students are encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings and present research findings at the UIC undergraduate research day.

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Sigmund Burdin

Email Address: sigmund@uic.edu
College: Urban Planning and Public Affairs Department: Accounting
Title: testing update

Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Katie Burkhouse

Email Address: kburkho@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 249 Phone: 3124134470
Webpage: https://www.psych.uic.edu/research/lab-directory/families-affective-neuroscience-and-mood-disorders-fam-lab
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The Families, Affective Neuroscience, and Mood Disorders Laboratory is now accepting applications for undergraduate research assistants. The research lab is based in the psychiatry department at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Our research seeks to identify behavioral-brain risk markers and preventive interventions for child and adolescent depression. By combining multiple units of analysis, (i.e., behavioral, EEG, pupil dilation, fMRI), we explore cognitive-affective processing styles involved in the development of depression in youth and also in the transmission of depression from parents to their offspring. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop reliable, objective tools that can aid in the prevention and diagnosis of youth depression.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
- *Must be detail-oriented, hard-working, professional, prompt, reliable and good with people. You will be helping make the lab run; therefore, your commitment and reliability are extremely important.

- Preference will be given to students who have an interest and experience working with children and families and can commit to the lab for 1 year or more.

- Prefer sophomores or above
-Minimum GPA of 3.3.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You will help administer and perform research funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Tasks may involve helping with literature searches, recruitment, screening potential participants on the phone, scheduling participants, collecting electrophysiological brain data (EEG) from participants, processing EEG data, and data entry. Opportunities may exist for the preparation of posters or research papers, depending on the student's interest, capability and willingness to put in time.

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Joanna Buscemi

Email Address: jbuscemi@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Institute of Health Research and Policy
Title: Assistant Professor

Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Behavioral Medicine, Health Psychology, Public Health, Cancer Prevention and Control

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Honors college student preference
Senior student
Spanish speaking

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Provide assistance on a research project to improve the quality of life of Hispanic breast cancer survivors.
Daily work will involve scheduling participants, collecting participant data, and helping with translations of study materials.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Adriana Caballero

Email Address: adrianac@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Title: Reseach Assistant Professor
Office: 674 Phone: 69074
Webpage: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=caballero+A+Tseng+OR+Caballero+A+Drake+OR+Caballero+A+KSHV+OR+Caballero+A+Loyola
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
In the broad sense, our lab is interested in understanding how experiences (inputs) shape the brain’s ability to process information. Depending on the timing of the input and the area involved in the processing, these experiences can change the brain temporarily or permanently to fine tune and/or optimize its response (output). Similarly, an impairment or mistiming of inputs can have a detrimental effect on the processing ability of any given brain area, particularly in the cortex. We study the prefrontal cortex during adolescence to understand the mechanisms/inputs underlying the acquisition of adult cognitive functions, and how those mechanisms can be altered to confer a higher vulnerability to psychiatric disorders during this developmental window.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12-15; at least two days a week in the lab

Qualifications of a Student:
Cell biology or Molecular Biology or Biochemistry +any Neuroscience/Neurobiology course. GPA:3.7+. Previous lab experience highly desirable. Priority will be given to students that can commit at least one year and/or those who would like to work on a senior thesis project.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We seek students with a deep sense of curiosity who are eager to learn. Students must display problem solving abilities and good organizational skills. Prior research experience is a plus. When in the lab, the student must have the mindset of maximal learning and, as such, is expected to help and interact with other lab members to broaden his/her skills and knowledge. For full consideration, apply through the URE page and follow-up with a copy of your resume.

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Jordi Cabana-Jimenez

Email Address: jcabana@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 4146 Phone: 312-355-4309
Webpage: http://chem.uic.edu/chemistry/people/faculty/jordi-cabana
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our group is generally interested in the physical and inorganic chemistry of materials, with emphasis on redox and transport properties. We aim to provide chemistry solutions to technological problems in energy applications, with current focus on electrochemical energy storage, which is critical in the development of a green economy based on renewable sources. Our group combines approaches from classical solid state chemistry with nanoscience, with the goal of contributing to a unified field, where, for instance, synthesis of complex new compounds can rapidly be transitioned to their nano/mesoscale tailoring.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in Inorganic or Materials or Physical Chemistry. Knowledge in areas relevant to these disciplines required. CHEM114 is a minimum requirement.
Minimum GPA: 3.3
Preferred Major: Chemistry or related.
Year in College: Sophomore or higher.
Will give priority to students who commit for long stretches of time in a given day.
Students from underrepresented communities are particularly encouraged to apply.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We are looking for committed, organized and reliable individuals. Depending on the Chemistry area in our group, the student will have to develop skills in either synthesis and handling of air sensitive materials or design and performance of experiments coupling electrochemistry with X-ray-based tools. Work will take place under the mentorship of either a senior graduate student or postdoctoral researcher (or both), with periodic meetings with the faculty supervisor. In addition to laboratory hours, undergraduate researchers will be expected to attend group meetings on a regular basis.

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Jennifer Lauren Cabrelli Amaro

Email Address: cabrelli@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1712 University Hall Phone: 3129960925
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I investigate adult language acquisition of phonetics and phonology and experimental phonology, which is informed by data from speech production and speech perception. My primary focus is currently third language acquisition, specifically linguistic transfer between the systems of a multilingual.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should minimally have completed a basic linguistics course (in Spanish or another language). Desired (but not required) skills include knowledge of SPSS (statistical software) and proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You will be expected to work in the Multilingual Phonology Lab for approximately 9 hours a week. We will start by orienting you to the lab and its projects and using the different equipment. Then, you will join an ongoing project. You will help with experimental design, collection and analysis of speech production and perception data. We will train you to do these things. Finally, you will write your own paper about your work on the project and we will help you present it at a student conference.

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Richard R Cameron

Email Address: rcameron@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Literatures, Cultural Studies and Linguistics
Title: Professor of Linguistics
Office: 1715 UH Phone: 312-996-3241
Webpage: https://lcsl.uic.edu/linguistics/people/faculty/richard-cameron
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interest are primarily in the fields of sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, and applied linguistics.
Topics include variation and change (Spanish and English), gender, age, and social class, medical discourse, needs analysis for second language instruction, and narrative.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
The student should have taken a class or classes in linguistics and have some knowledge of issues in discourse and narrative.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We will work together to identify narratives and non-narrative stretches of speech from interviews with heart patients. Specifically, we will look to identify illness narratives focusing on experiences of heart failure and treatment.

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Mark E. Canuel

Email Address: mcanuel@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Office: 2000 UH M/C 162 Phone: 4132238
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No

Research Interest:
British Romanticism; Historical interests include nationalism, religious toleration, crime and punishment, political theory

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Knowledge of library research tools; Completion of introductory English courses, especially ENGL 241 and 242

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Dingcai Cao

Email Address: dcao98@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1905 W. Taylor Street, Room 149 Phone: 312-355-3662
Webpage: http://vpl.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We are interested in understanding human visual function, eye diseases and developing sensitive tools for eye disease detection. Our research projects are funded by grants from NIH and private foundations.

We need undergraduate students who have maintained great academic performance, have meticulous nature, feel comfortable interacting with human subjects (including patients), and are willing to participate visual experiments and get involved in data management.

Students with computer science, electrical engineering, psychology or biology will be desired.

Benefits:
The research experience in our laboratory will be highly beneficial for those who are interested in pursuing graduate studies in visual neuroscience, professional careers in optometry or ophthalmology, engineering in color technologies etc. I have trained students who eventually attended graduate schools in neuroscience, electrical engineering, and statistics, medical schools, and optometry schools.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Requirements:
1) Meticulous, committed students who want to learn about research in the field of visual neuroscience.
2) Willing to commit to 8 to 10 hours per week of work.
3) Some background or courses related to neuroscience, psychology, electrical engineering, computer programming, or statistics.
4) GPA >= 3.5

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Principal responsibilities may include
1) To provide routine or standardized laboratory or administrative duties and collecting routine data in support of visual neuroscience research projects under direct supervision.
2) To participate in experiments for data collection as subjects
3) To assist with recruiting and scheduling research subjects or patients.
4) To assist with data management and data analysis.
5) To assist with data management, data analyses, the preparation of reports or manuscripts.
6) To provide general administrative support and assist lab members in preparing and conducting experiments.

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Michael Caracotsios

Email Address: mcaracot@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Clinical Associate Professor
Office: CEB 209 Phone: 312-413-3777
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Development of computational modules in the fields of Thermodynamics and Process Control to enhance the student learning experience.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10-20

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.0
Preferred Major: Chemical Engineering
Knowledge of VBA Programming in Excel
Chemical Engineering Background in Thermodynamics, Transport Phenomena and Reaction Kinetics
A good background in Differential and integral Calculus

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student is expected to do some research in the fields of Thermodynamics and Process Control and implement in EXCEL via the VBA programming language computational modules related to these chemical engineering subjects.

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Michael D Carrithers

Email Address: mcar1@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine
Secondary Department: Microbiology and Immunology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: JBVAMC
Webpage: http://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/cms/One.aspx?portalId=506244&pageId=30076501
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Neuroimmunology, multiple sclerosis, innate immunity
(see web page and associated links)

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Freshmen and sophomores preferred

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Basic science experiments in immunology, molecular biology and cell biology

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C. Sue Carter

Email Address: scarter@psych.uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Secondary Department: Psychology
Office: 466 SPHPI M/C Phone: 3551593
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No

Research Interest:
Brain and Behavioral Relationships in Mammals; Behavioral Neuroendocrinology; Hormones and Behavior; Neuroanatomical and neuroendocrine basis of social behaviors including pair bond formation and maternal behavior in rodent models.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
Background in science; Enthusiasm for learning about the brain and behavior; Willingness to come to the West Campus and enough time commitment, ideally for at least one academic year, to make the student's efforts to learn new material worthwhile and productive.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will learn a variety of laboratory techniques and approaches used to study the relationship between brain and behavior. They will be expected to mature, responsible and capable of budgeting their own time.

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Marsha F Cassidy

Email Address: mcassidy@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Title: Senior Lecturer
Office: 2008 UH M/C 162 Phone: 312-413-8939
Webpage: http://tigger.uic.edu/~mcassidy/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
As a scholar and historian in media studies, I am interested in the ways in which media texts simulate sensations and corporeal experiences on the screen and appeal to both the body and mind of the viewer. My work is inter-disciplinary: I am researching how phenomenology, cultural studies, and new work in neuroscience and psychology help explain the ways in which media texts are designed to provoke visceral, multi-sensory, and emotional responses. My research in this area began with a study of cigarette advertising on television from 1948 to 1971 (before the government ban). I concluded that cigarette ads not only appealed to viewers' cultural and social desires but also evoked much more powerful sensory responses, arousing through sight and sound the sensations of touch, taste, and inhalation. One of my most recent published essays examines the gender meanings embedded in the visceral acts of eating, dieting, and vomiting in the TV series MAD MEN and SIX FEET UNDER. I have also presented a paper on the Sundance series PUSH GIRLS, which follows four paralyzed women who experience life from the corporeal and cultural vantage point of a wheelchair. I suggest that PUSH GIRLS offers viewers a visceral and kinetic encounter with paralysis and a “stare and tell” aesthetic associated with disability performance art. At an international conference for the Society for the Cognitive Study of the Moving Image in 2016, I presented a paper on levels of consciousness and the sublime as represented in the series SIX FEET UNDER. And I am currently under contract with Routledge Publishing to write a book with the working title, TELEVISION, BIOCULTURE, AND THE BODY.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in media studies, film, popular culture, philosophy, neuroscience, psychology; familiarity with library research; reliability; ability to meet deadlines; punctual; clear writer.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Research the ways in which the mind sciences and recent work in cognitive film studies can help explain viewers' somatic and visceral responses to television texts.
Screen selected TV texts that illustrate television's corporeal appeals. Take notes that document key examples.
Locate and summarize scholarly research on the selected TV programs.
The research assistant and I will meet regularly to discuss findings.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Soyoung Stephen Cha

Email Address: sscha@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Office: 2039 ERF M/C Phone: 9969612
Webpage: http://www.mie.uic.edu/faculty/cha.htm

Research Interest:
Optical visualization and diagnostics for mechanical engineering

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
At least junior standing; Willingness to learn modern laser and vision diagnostics systems.

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Frank Chaloupka

Email Address: fjc@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Economics
Secondary Department: Health Policy Administration
Title: Distinguished Professor
Office: 444 WROB Phone: 413-2287
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~fjc
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Economic, policy, environmental and socio-demographic determinants of health behavior, including tobacco use, alcohol use and abuse, illicit drug use, physical activity, healthy eating, obesity, and related outcomes.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Some computer experience, such as spreadsheets, word processing, and /or SAS/STATA program helpful, but not necessary

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Donald Chambers

Email Address: donc@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Office: A312 CMW M/C 536 Phone: 9967670

Research Interest:
Biochemical mechanisms of disease; Cell proliferation and differentiation; Host-microbial interactions and biochemical genetics; Neuro-immune interactions

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Biology or chemistry major; Junior or senior standing; Commitment to a minimum of two semesters

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Kee Chan

Email Address: kchan88@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Health Policy Administration
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor and Program Co-Director
Office: 753 Phone: 312 996 1325
Webpage: www.keechanphd.com
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Kee Chan is a passionate teacher of the science and management of health and wellness.

The University of Illinois, Chicago has an accredited School of Public Health which offers on-campus and online MPH degree. Dr. Chan is one of Program Directors of the Master of Public Health (MPH) online programs, and a Faculty member in the Department of Health Policy and Administration and Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) in Leadership Program at the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois, Chicago (UIC). Her teaching interest includes the intersection of science and strategic planning, financial analysis, public health management, and medical decision-making analysis. Dr. Chan researches the comparative analysis of new biomedical intervention and testing on improving population health and its impact on healthcare services delivery. At UIC, Dr. Chan is teaching graduate-level (MPH, Ph.D., and DrPH) courses and mentoring graduate students on their capstone and dissertation projects. Dr. Chan is an expert on developing mathematical models to determine time-saving and cost-effective strategies in improving public health.

Research Interest:
Medical Decision Making
Infectious Diseases (HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis)
Public Health Genomics and Chronic Diseases
Strategic Management and Financial Analysis
Maternal and Child Health

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
GPA 3.6
Prerequisite: Introduction to Public Health,
College Year: Junior and Senior

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
1. Conduct a literature review.
2. Maintain a database.
3. Help with administrative tasks
4. Writing up manuscript
5. Data collection and analysis

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Hui-Ching Chang

Email Address: huiching@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Communication
Title: Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Honors College
Office: 1152D BSB M/C 132 Phone: 4132199
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/comm/people/faculty/chang.shtml
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Culture and communication, intercultural communication.
Communication patterns and language use in Chinese and other Asian contexts.
Political discourse--naming practices, metaphors, and rhetoric--between Taiwan and the People's Republic of China.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in non-Western cultures and knowledge of library research.

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Robert Jin-Hong Chang

Email Address: changr@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Title: Research Assistant professor
Phone: 3124135590
Webpage: 1855 W. Taylor street
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our lab conducts research in corneal neovascularization with a focus on the role of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, endostatin and MMP-7-derived fragments of collagen XVIII in corneal angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: n/a

Qualifications of a Student:

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Brian P Chaplin

Email Address: chaplin@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 221 CEB Phone: 996-0288
Webpage: https://chaplinslab.wordpress.com
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Water Treatment; Electrochemistry; Sensors; Batteries

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA = 3.0
Engineering, Chemistry or Physics majors
Prior experience desirable, but not required

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will assist graduate students in research related to water treatment or electrochemical technology development or testing. Duties include running experiments, analyzing water samples, interpreting/plotting data, and mathematical modeling.

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Lan Nguyen Chaplin

Email Address: nguyenl@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Managerial Studies
Title: Associate Professior
Office: University Hall: 2206
Webpage: http://business.uic.edu/home-uic-business/faculty-departments-research/department-of-managerial-studies/faculty/lan-chaplin
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Children's Consumer Behavior
Branding
Materialism
Identity and Consumption

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.50
Honors college student
Year--Junior or Senior only
Prereq--MKTG 462: Marketing Research

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be expected to do extensive literature searches and assist in various aspects of developing consumer behavior and/or branding studies on an as needed basis (e.g., developing study stimuli (materials), calling potential data collection sites). Students will also be expected to assist in preparing various aspects of presentations and manuscripts such as figures, tables, and references, on an as needed basis. This position would be ideal for students interested in gaining valuable research experience prior to applying to graduate school. Students are expected to be detail oriented, to work quickly but carefully, and to be proactive (suggest good ideas to Professor Chaplin).
Qualifications of Students:
Minimum GPA: 3.50
Honors college student
Year--Junior or Senior only
Prereq--MKTG 462: Marketing Research
If interested, please email: nguyenl@uic.edu (Please attach a resume)

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Kayla Chase

Email Address: kchase1@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1601 W Taylor St. STE: 232 Phone: 7089214743
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We are a molecular biology laboratory examining the epigenetic underpinnings of Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.
Our techniques include: Animal research; Clinical data collection and development of statistical databases in SPSS; Statistical analysis of preliminary data; Lymphocyte and other nucleated blood cell extraction and culture from patient blood samples; DNA and mRNA isolation; Plasmid construction and transfection; Cell Culture of Primary Cortical Neurons and primary human lymphocytes; Conducting real-time PCR and Western blot analysis.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 7

Qualifications of a Student:
Applicant, please have the following qualifications:
Honors college student
At least junior standing
Minimum GPA of 3.0

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Santanu Chaudhuri

Email Address: santc@illinois.edu
College: Engineering Department: Civil and Materials Engineering
Title: Professor
Phone: 5099441296
Webpage: https://publish.illinois.edu/santc/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Computational Modeling and Simulations for Connecting Chemistry, Transport and Phase Transitions in nano-to-microscale. Students with computational materials science, physics, chemistry, manufacturing science and all engineering background are all welcome. The modeling and simulations research focus on atomistic simulation techniques to understand the dynamics of phase transformation, transport and chemical reactions in condensed matter. Current research areas include investigations of dynamic changes due to pressure, temperature, electric field and dynamic loading (shock and shear) using atomistic and mesoscale simulations for connecting atoms-to-grain level changes in materials. We leverage petascale supercomputing resources for developing open source tools for data-enabled computational material discovery. The work is conducted in close collaboration with Industry and Argonne National Lab.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Min GPA 3.2, preliminary classes in math, computer programing, physics is needed. Write a brief statement of interest.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Timely execution of tasks, teamwork, and ability to interact with experts, and strong skills in presentation, computing is preferred

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Julio C. Chavarria

Email Address: jchava1@uic.edu
College: Honors Department: Honors College
Secondary Department: Honors College

Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Chun-Tao Che

Email Address: chect@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Title: Harry H.S. Fong Professor of Pharmacognosy
Office: 323 PHARM Phone: 996-5234
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Drug discovery from natural products;
Isolation and biological properties of chemical compounds from medicinal plants, e.g. Chinese medicines;
Standardization and quality control of botanical preparations;
Literature database of medicinal plants and natural products;
Traditional Chinese medicine;
Botanical dietary supplements;
Spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses of natural products.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Honors College student;
Junior year and up;
Science major

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Genuine interest in science and bench work;
Sense of responsibility;
Good communication skills and willingness to participate in team work.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Hsiu-lang Chen

Email Address: hsiulang@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Finance
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 2425 UH Phone: 355-1024
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~hsiulang
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Mutual Funds/Hedge Funds/ETFs
Information Diffusion across the supply chain
Investment Style Migration

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
1. You have completed Fin 412 Portfolio Management.
2. You are good at programming.
3. You have taken some courses in statistics or econometrics.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
1. Retrieve data from the service provided by WRDS.wharton.upenn.edu.
2. Analyze the data

This experience will allow you to understand what empirical research in Finance is all about, and help you decide whether you might like to pursue it later in your career. If research is for you, then this experience will prepare you for graduate school, but even if you aren't interested in graduate school, you will learn many investment strategies and have deep understanding about the financial market.

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Jiwang Chen

Email Address: chenjw@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Allergy; Department of Medicine
Title: Research Associate Professor and Director of the Center of Cardiovascular Research Physiology Core at UIC
Office: COMRB 3128 Phone: 3123555895
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We have been employing animal models of human diseases, cell culture models and molecular biology approaches to investigate whether and how some drugs are beneficial to patients. The diseases we are focusing on include pulmonary hypertension and acute lung injury.

I also work as Director of the Center of Cardiovascular Research Physiology Core at UIC. We provide multiple state-of-art techniques for research scientists. These techniques include whole animal imaging system, ECHO, pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling and models for heart failure.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred major is biology or engineering, but not a must;

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The students are expected to be honest, diligent and highly interested in medical research. The students are also expected to have a good communication and socialization with colleagues. In addition, the students are good at writing.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Liaohai Leo Chen

Email Address: lhchen@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Surgery
Secondary Department: Chemistry
Title: Professor

Webpage: sprdlab.org
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The Surgical Precision R&D Laboratory fosters the convergence of engineering with physical sciences and life sciences and focuses on translational efforts in developing smart tools for surgery and drug delivery, early disease warning devices, and probes for molecular imaging and imaging guided therapy.

Current research themes include:

1.Intraprocedural microperfusion quantification for tissue function assessment,
anastomosis, flap and transplantation surgeries;

2.Intraprocedural tissue spectroscopy and imaging to unveil nerves, vessels, or tumor mass, etc., thus to reduce the chance of tissue damage, and to precisely margin tumor tissues;

3. Portable devices to monitor disease biomarker and medication adherence;

4.Developing a smart reagent with dual functions of imaging and therapy for surgical oncology;

5.Coupling intraoperative local optical spectroscopy/imaging with pre-operative tomography image for more precise surgical maneuvers.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Late sophomore, junior or senior students from biology/medicine, chemistry, physics, or engineering

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Strong enthusiasm in conducting research
Hard working

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Jun Cheng

Email Address: juncheng@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Bioengineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 209 SEO Phone: 996-2333
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/chenglab/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Research Interests: Study of the regulatory mechanism of stem cell self-renew and differentiation; Biomechanical study of sub-cellular structure by laser microsurgery; Development and applications of laser nano-machining

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
minimum gpa = 3.0

prerequisite classes necessary: Intro Physics, Calculus, Intro Programming.

prior experience with matlab is plus

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Participate in research, including experimental preparation, data acquisition and analysis, bio-mechanical modeling

Work together with graduate students / post-doctroal fellow

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Anjen Chenn

Email Address: achenn@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pathology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: COMRB 6095 Phone: 312-355-4154
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/chennlab/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our major research interest is understanding the factors that control cell proliferation and differentiation in the developing mammalian central nervous system. The ongoing research of the lab seeks to understand the function and control of these pathways in normal and abnormal brain development and brain tumor cells. Abnormalities in normal neural development underlie a number of human disorders, including schizophrenia, mental retardation, and autism, and uncontrolled proliferation/abnormal differentiation play a critical role in brain cancers. The identification and better understanding of these key pathways can lead to improved diagnostic tools and novel drug targets in these important human disorders.

#neuroscience
#development
#mouse
#transgenic
#knockout

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Student applications will be evaluated on an individual basis and responsibilities and projects determined according to interests, background, and abilities. The lab has had a strong history of placement into professional and graduate schools as well as experience training PhD, MD-PhD students.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
An excellent candidate will have:
1) Strong work ethic
2) High degree of personal/professional responsibility
3) Internal (self) motivation

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Sheng-Wei Chi

Email Address: swchi@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Civil and Materials Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: ERF 3087 Phone: 3129965024
Webpage: http://www.cme.uic.edu/bin/view/CME/ProfileChi
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Image-based computer modeling for biomedical applications, such as muscles and bones.
Multiscale material modeling.
Finite element analysis.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.0
Prerequisite: CME 201 and 203 or equivalent.
Preferred Major: Engineering
Junior or Senior.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Self motivation.
Creativity.

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Jessie Chin

Email Address: chin5@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Biomed and Health Info Sciences
Secondary Department: Honors College
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: 1919 W Taylor St
Webpage: https://ahs.uic.edu/biomedical-health-information-sciences/directory/chin-jessie/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
[I. Research Areas]: Cognitive Science, Applied Cognitive Science, Human-Computer Interaction, Aging, Gerontology, Health Informatics.

[II. Current Research Projects]
1. Investigating the dissemination and trajectories of health misinformation in social media.
2. Investigating information search and comprehension during medical decision making.
3. Investigating the use of smart conversational AI agents for health management and self-care (especially among older adults)
4. Investigating the use of animal foraging models to study information search and learning across the lifespan.
5. Investigating the ways to promote health literacy among older adults and underserved community.


[III. Approach]
Quantitative Methods: Combination of behavioral experiments, computational methods and statistical modeling.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
1. Willing to learn new things.
2. Preferred major: Psychology, Computer Science and anyone who is interested in conducting multidisciplinary research.
3. No prior experience is needed.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
1. Students will have the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary research studies and gain research trainings in cognitive science, human-computer interaction and information science.
2. Students are expected to learn new skills and techniques as guided by the mentor.
3. Students will have opportunity to learn different ways to conduct data analysis (such as statistics, machine learning, data mining).
4. Students are expected to connect regularly for discussing the progress.
5. Students are encouraged and will gain full support to present their own research works, participate in international conferences and apply for awards and fellowships to receive different experience.

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Jaehyung Cho

Email Address: thromres@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pharmacology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 5095 CoMRB Phone: 55923
Webpage: http://mcph.uic.edu/cho
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The research interest of my laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms of thrombus formation and vascular inflammation. A better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of heterotypic platelet-leukocyte-endothelial interactions could lead to the development of a novel therapeutic for prevention and treatment of thrombo-inflammatory diseases.

1. Role of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) in vascular disease.

Previous studies revealed that extracellular PDI interacts with platelet and endothelial cell beta3 integrins, thereby regulating platelet thrombus formation at the site of arteriolar injury (Cho et al, JCI 2008; Cho et al, Blood 2012). Using PDI conditional knockout mice, we demonstrated that neutrophil surface PDI is required for alphaMbeta2 integrin function and neutrophil recruitment during venular inflammation (Hahm et al, Blood 2013) and that platelet surface PDI is important for alphaIIbbeta3 integrin-mediated platelet accumulation during arteriolar thrombus formation (Kim et al, Blood 2013). Using various genetic, biochemical and cell biological approaches, we are currently studying the molcular mechanisms by which PDI regulates platelet, neutrophil, and endothelial cell functions during vascular disease.

2. Mechanisms regulating platelet-neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions during thromboinflammatory disease.

Evidence shows that the heterotypic interaction of platelets and leukocytes on the activated endothelium plays an important role in mediating vaso-occlusion during pathological inflammation and thrombosis. Although the receptor-counter receptor for cell-cell interactions has been identified, it remains unclear how heterotypic cell-cell interactions are regulated in thrombo-inflammatory disease. We have shown that AKT2 is a critical regulator for heterotypic cell-cell interactions under thrombo-inflammatory conditions (Li et al, J Clin Invest 2014). We are investigating key signaling pathways regulating the expression and function of surface molecules required for platelet-neutrophil interactions.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
I prefer a student who is in a major of biology or biochemistry. Dependent on work hours, PI can give him/her a short-term independent project.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Because of the specificity of our projects, the student should devote a minimum of 15-20 hours (ideally 20 hours). Otherwise, it is hard to work on our project.

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Michael Cho

Email Address: mcho@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: SEO228 Phone: 39424
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
stem cell-based tissue engineering
cellular biomechanics
optical and mechanical imaging
modeling stem cell differentiation
in vitro model studies of blast-induced brain cell injury

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
juniors and seniors with biology background and strong engineering and science knowledge

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
be able to learn sophisticated molecular and biophysical techniques and apply them to the biological or clinical problems; reliable and dedicated to research; be able to work in a team-setting

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Wonhwa Cho

Email Address: wcho@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Professor
Office: 2231 SEL M/C 111 Phone: 9964883
Webpage: http://brahms.chem.uic.edu
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Chemical biology of cellular signaling and regulation; Development of molecular sensors for bioimaging; Study of cell membranes and membrane binding proteins; Development of small molecule modulators of cell regulation.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
Knowledge of chemistry and biochemistry

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Jamie F. Chriqui

Email Address: jchriqui@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Health Policy Administration
Secondary Department: Institute of Health Research and Policy
Title: Professor
Office: 444 WROB Phone: 312-355-5347
Webpage: http://www.ihrp.uic.edu/researcher/jamie-f-chriqui-phd-mhs
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research focuses on studying the role of public policy and law on communities, systems, schools, and individual behaviors and health-related outcomes. Most of my research studies policies at the state, county, municipal and school district levels nationwide, their impact on the community/system/school, and ultimately on individual attitudes and health-related outcomes.

My research is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US Department of Agriculture, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Examples of the policies that I study include zoning and land use policies, beverage taxation, school wellness-related issues, tobacco control policy issues, diet and nutrition policy, physical activity, policy, and many other chronic disease-related issues. My research has provided a rationale for three recent federal regulations.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
SPH undergrad or Honors college student preference but not required; at least a 3.0 GPA; ideally sophomore or higher; excellent organizational skills and extreme attention to detail. Excellent research skills. Interest in public policy, children's health, and/or public health a plus. Prior experience with data entry, literature searches, and supporting development of PowerPoint presentations and Word documents a plus. Excellent oral communication skills a must.

Student will work out of my research office located in the Institute for Health Research and Policy on the west campus, 1747 W. Roosevelt Road (Westside Research Office Building). The intercampus shuttle stops across the street from the building.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I am currently recruiting for up to 2 undergraduate students to support a large, nationwide survey of implementation of new federal standards governing meals and snacks served in low-income child day care centers. The student hired for this position will help with conducting Internet research, implementing the survey, sending follow-up reminders, tracking survey responses, conducting some surveys by phone, help with basic data analysis, and help with report and presentation development.

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Ginevra Clark

Email Address: ginevra@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Director of the Science Learning Center
Office: SES205A Phone: 312-413-4705
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
This research is focused on developing new laboratory procedures for an Organic and Biochemistry course for pre-health professionals. Work includes testing and creating new labs, working with faculty to improve focus on health-related concepts, and revisions based on laboratory observation.

Project can focus more on developing labs or analyzing pedagogical approach, depending on the student's interests and abilities.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
B or higher in General Chemistry and one semester of Organic Chemistry (or Chem 130) required. Interest in teaching.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Over the course of the semester, the student is expected to:
1. Independently test and optimize laboratory procedures created by PI.
2. Identify in the literature alternative, related procedures that are relevant to healthcare, test them.
3. Write a preliminary lab handout for students and teaching notes for TAs.

Further work for the spring includes:
4. Observe the lab in progress; what is and isn't working?
5. Revise materials based on laboratory observations.

A summer project would entail:
6. Analyze students outcomes (summer) and do further revisions

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Stephanie Cluggish

Email Address: cluggish@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Theatre and Music
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Office: L462 Phone: 3124138560
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Costume Design and Technology

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
THTR 151 required

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Work alongside the costume designer and shop manager to produce work for the University programmed theatre season.

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Alina Carmen Cojocaru

Email Address: cojocaru@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
Title: Professor
Office: SEO 415
Webpage: http://www.math.uic.edu/~cojocaruA
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Algebra and Number Theory

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Mathematical curiosity and interest in rigorous reasoning.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Please email me.

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Sharon Collins

Email Address: scollins@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Sociology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4112D Phone: 6-2274
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Research interest is race and ethnicity and work with a special focus on the black middle class. Current research is a qualitative project looking at Black executive careers in Chicago.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Third or fourth year student who has taken upper division courses in sociology or economics. Student with social science research methods coursework is preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will be trained in coding qualitative data from interviews. Students will complete a interview summary sheet based on coding.

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Michael D Colvard

Email Address: colvard@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
Secondary Department: Periodontics
Title: Professor
Office: 569-E DENT M/C
Webpage: http://dentistry.uic.edu/departments/ompl/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dental and Medical Archaeology and Anthropology, Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Oral Medicine and Pain Care.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: flexible

Qualifications of a Student:
Any student exploring careers in medical anthropology, dentistry, ethnomedicine, and/or international health affairs

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Introduction to dental and medical anthropology and Ethnomedicine. Introduction to field based spectroscopy, Introduction to oral medicine and pharmacology based pain care.

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Karen Conrad

Email Address: kmconrad@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Health Policy Administration
Office: 784 SPH M/C Phone: 4130739

Research Interest:
Designing Ergonomic Interventions for the Fire Service

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Fall Term: Student interested in video production. We will be developing short training videos on the use of EMS equipment in a lab test. We are looking for student interested in aspects of video production.

Spring Term: Student interested in assisting with ergonomic job task analysis. We are looking for an an industrial engineering student who would like lab experience in human factors/safety

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Lorraine M Conroy

Email Address: lconroy@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 503 SPHW Phone: 312-996-7469
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Occupational safety and health
Occupational exposure assessment and control
Occupational stress and cardiovascular responses

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will work with a PhD student to collect data in a study of occupational and non-occupational stress and measures of cardiac reactivity. Several questionnaires will be administered by the student. The questionnaires will assess both occupational and non-occupational stress as well as self-reported health status. Cardiac measures will also be assessed during the visit. I will work with the undergraduate student to define one or more questions within the larger study that he/she can analyze data and try to answer.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




James Cook

Email Address: jlcook@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Infectious Diseases
Office: 888 CME M/C 735 Phone: 9966732

Research Interest:
Viral oncogene modulation of cellular responses to proapoptotic injuries; Studies of oncogene-induces cellular pathway changes that either repress antiapopotoic cellular defenses or enhance proapoptotic cellular responses are the focus of the laboratory.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
At least sophomore standing; Pre-Med: Biology or Biochemistry major; Coursework should include genetics, microbiology, or biochemistry. (Concurrent enrollment is fine.); Basic computer skills are necessary

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Lyndon F. Cooper

Email Address: cooperlf@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Oral Biology
Title: Head, and Associate Dean for Research
Office: 402e College of Dentistry Phone: 312 996 7515
Webpage: https://dentistry.uic.edu/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Bone Biology and Dental Implant Therapy
Gene profiling analysis in human therapeutics
Control of Gene Transcription

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
3.0 GPA
required experience in biologic laboratory
2nd - 4th year students

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
students will work with Post Doctoral fellows in performing laboratory studies involving cell culture and molecular biology. Student will keep meticulous notebook and assist the laboratory in organization and updating of our "toolbox" for common assays and investigations. Student will communicate activities and research progress through written summaries such that student work may be continued by others in future. Students will identify a mutually convenient work schedule with opportunities for interaction with both the laboratory PI and postdoctoral fellows and is expected to maintain 100% attendance according to the established schedule. It is anticipated that student research will culminate in work that will be presented at university research presentation venues and through eventual publication.

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Daniel Corcos

Email Address: dcorcos@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Movement Sciences
Office: B47 AHS M/C 194 Phone: 3551708
Webpage: http://mcl.kines.uic.edu

Research Interest:
Parkinson's Disease

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Jose Cordoba-Chacon

Email Address: jcordoba@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism; Department of Medicine
Title: Instructor
Office: CMWT #816 Phone: 3123553565
Webpage: cordoba.red.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Overall research interests: Lipid homeostasis; Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH); Diabetes; Nutrition

My specific research interests are focused on the role that hepatocyte PPARgamma plays in the development of hepatic liver disease and how hepatocyte PPARgamma regulates postprandial dyslipidemia.

We use tissue-specific knockout mouse models to perform experiments in live animals to assess physiological processes: diet-induced obesity, diet-induced steatosis and NASH, glucose and insulin tolerance tests, bleedding in different metabolic conditions to measure metabolic endpoints, etc. In addition, we use a wide spectrum of molecular biology techniques to address our hypothesis in samples derived from in vivo studies: qRT-PCR, western-blots, GC/MS, LC/MS, etc.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Excellent Qualifications. Biological Sciences Background. Basic understanding of animal physiology.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Motivated students. Commitment with research project. Follow-up discussions and understanding of the research.

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Izzet Coskun

Email Address: coskun@math.uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
Title: Associate Professor
Office: SEO 423 Phone: 3124132152
Webpage: http://www.math.uic.edu/~coskun
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am an algebraic geometer. Algebraic geometry studies properties of solutions of polynomial equations and has applications to many other fields including number theory, representation theory and string theory. Some of the basic questions I think about include: How many solutions does this equation have? What does the set of solutions look like?

An undergraduate student working with me would compute the dimensions of the spaces of polynomials satisfying various constraints. For example, if we fix finitely many points in the plane, what is the dimension of the space of polynomials whose Taylor expansions vanish to given orders at those points?

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
The student must be a junior or senior Mathematics major. The student must have completed MATH 320, MATH 330, MATH 417.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be expected to read and learn basic algebraic geometry. The particular problem that the student will work on will be decided based on the student's interests.

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Shelby A. Cosner

Email Address: sacosner@uic.edu
College: Education Department: Educational Policy Studies
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 3444 Phone: 312 731 0860
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
I am co-leading a 2-year qualitative research project in 4 CPS schools. We will be using a design research approach to examine our (UIC's college of education) learning design of three strands of professional development delivered to support elementary teacher/school principal/network administrator learning and school-wide improvement of PK-5 mathematics instruction/student learning. This project will emphasize the improvement of mathematics teaching from a Common Core perspective and in relation to diverse learners (including students who speak English as a second language as well as those with special needs).

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
3.2 or better GPA is desired. Desired sophomore or later.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be assisting with the collection of qualitative data (which will include the capture of video data from large professional development sessions). Expertise with video equipment/videotaping is highly desired. Will need to be able to travel to four CPS schools (geographically located south and slightly west of the UIC campus) either in own car or via mass transition is a must. Student will serve as videographer and will be responsible for formatting/labeling and storing all data (video, artifacts, interviews, etc). Will need to be able to upload various data sources to a computer server. The student will have to be available some after school and/or early evenings as professional development is scheduled at this time. There will be 15-20 professional development sessions scheduled throughout the year. Will likely be using computer; general comfort and use of technology is desired.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Randal Cox

Email Address: randal@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Office: 1010 MBRB M/C Phone: 4134205
Webpage: http://mgbig.gene.uic.edu/papers/projection/

Research Interest:
Bioinformatics, especially relating to promoter analysis and phylogeny.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Student must speak perl well; Some knowledge of C and command line helpful.

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Natania A Crane

Email Address: ncrane3@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Postdoctoral Fellow
Office: SPH/PI 450 Phone: 312-413-4453
Webpage: https://www.psych.uic.edu/research/lab-directory/madrp-phan-lab
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
The Phan Lab in the Psychiatry Department is now accepting applications for undergraduate research assistants. Our work seeks to better understand how the brain impacts mood and behavior in order to innovate strategies to prevent and treat adults with mental illness. We use neuroscience measures and methods (e.g., fMRI, EEG) in adults to study the emotional brain and marry this approach with psychopharmacology, neuromodulation and intervention trials.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
- *Must be detail-oriented, hard-working, professional, reliable with good social skills. You will helping run our lab; therefore, your commitment and reliability are extremely important.
- Preference will be given to students who have an interest in neuroscience based research and can commit to the lab for 1 year or more.
- Prefer sophomores or above.
-Minimum GPA of 3.0.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You will help administer and perform research-related tasks. These tasks may include assisting in subject recruitment, screening potential participants on the phone, scheduling participants, collecting psychophysiological data from participants, and processing data/data entry. Opportunities may exist for the preparation of posters or research papers, depending on the student's interest, capability and willingness.

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Isabel Cruz

Email Address: ifcruz@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Office: 1134 SEO M/C 152 Phone: 3551141
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/~ifc/

Research Interest:
Databases; Web Information Systems; Visual User Interfaces

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Strong background in two or more of: databases, software engineering, graphics, algorithms, programming languages, artificial intelligence

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Henar Cuervo Grajal

Email Address: hcuervo@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Physiology and Biophysics
Title: PhD
Office: COMRB2139 Phone: 3129964355
Webpage: https://physiology.uic.edu/faculty/index.html?fac=henarcuervograjal&cat=active
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
My lab focuses on how perivascular cells (cells surrounding the blood vessels) interact with the endothelium and modulate the formation and functionality of blood vessels. We use a combination of mouse models and cell culture in our studies.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12-15

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimun GPA: 3.5

Preferred biology related major with an interest in graduate school or medical school after graduation.

Qualifications:
- Interest and enthusiasm for science.
- Previous lab experience is not required but is a plus.
- Not be afraid to work with mice.

Honors College/GPPA students will be given priority.

Students who are motivated and have experience in our lab might become eligible to work half- or full-time during the summer as hourly paid employees.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We are expecting students to commit to working in the lab a minimum of 12 to 15 hours per week and to be able to be in the lab for periods of 3-5 hours per day and ideally on consecutive days.

Time management and responsibility are key. Students are expected to show promptly at work and stay focused on work tasks during their time in the lab.

We are looking for students who are willing to commit to working in the lab for 2+ years.

Students will be trained on different laboratory techniques and participate on research projects. We also expect the students to familiarize themselves with background/literature relevant to the lab’s research. High-performing students will get the chance to present their research at seminars and meetings.

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Jonathan W. Daly

Email Address: daly@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: History
Title: Professor
Office: 1019 UH M/C 198 Phone: 996-3141
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/hist/Faculty/daly.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I have three main ongoing projects:
1. A book on "Seven Myths of the Russian Revolution." Components of the project are: (a) Investigating which developments in the Russian Revolution are considered the biggest myths. (b) Researching the myths to find out what really happened.

2. An intellectual biography of historian and Sovietologist Richard Pipes. Components of the project are:

(a) An investigation of his contributions to the end of the Cold War.

(b) An examination of Pipes’s voluminous writings Russian intellectual, and cultural, political history.

(c) A study of the scholarly controversies that his writings provoked.

3. Revisions to my textbook, The Rise of Western Power: A Comparative History of Western Civilization (used him HIST/INST 105) for a second edition. Components of the project are: (a) Integrating latest research. (b) Proposing new maps. (c) Verifying and improving argumentation. (d) Eliminating any errors.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Familiarity with common online search techniques OR general knowledge about European and world history OR knowledge of Russian language.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Each of these projects requires compiling bibliographical references, gathering relevant documentation, analyzing texts, and preparing brief reports.

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Matthew Daly

Email Address: mattdaly@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Civil and Materials Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: ERF 3089
Webpage: https://amml.lab.uic.edu/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Microstructure – the fundamental unit of organization in materials – is perhaps the most important physical parameter underpinning material performance. For example, the microstructure of nominally soft metals, such as copper, can be engineered to be harder and stronger than steel. At the Advanced Materials and Microstructures Lab (AMML), we are engaged in fundamental studies of microstructure in order to develop advanced materials with unprecedented performance. Our approach implements a diverse set of cutting-edge experimental and computational techniques to reveal the physical laws that determine the behavior of new materials systems.

We are always looking for passionate and dedicated students to join our team! When contacting me, please indicate if you are interested in working for credit towards CME 392/ CME 496.

Specific areas of interest currently in the AMML include:
- Nanomaterials
- 2D materials (e.g. graphene)
- Deformation behavior of nanostructured metals

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred majors include: Civil Engineering, Mechanical engineering, Chemical Engineering, Physics.

Students who enjoyed CME 203 and/or CME 260 should find my research area interesting.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
At the AMML we are looking for people with a willingness to learn new skills, self-motivation, and eagerness to undertake challenging problems.

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Barbara Dancy

Email Address: bdancy@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Health Systems Science
Title: Professor and Associate Dean for Nursing Science Studies
Office: 512 NURS M/C 802 Phone: 9969168
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/nursing/facultypages/Barbara_Dancy.shtml

Research Interest:
Developing and testing innovative culturally relevant interventions designed to promote behavioral change in vulnerable underserved minority populations, including minority adolescents.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
To conduct literature reviews and to assist with various aspects of the research.

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Kirstie Danielson

Email Address: kdaniel@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Surgery
Secondary Department: Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: Clinical Sciences Building, Rm. 520 Phone: 312-996-6820
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Kirstie K. Danielson, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Transplant Surgery at UIC. She received her Ph.D. in Epidemiology (and a minor in Women’s Studies) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and was a postdoctoral scholar in Endocrinology at the University of Chicago, and a postdoctoral fellow in Epidemiology & Biostatistics at UIC. Dr. Danielson’s previous research focused on interrelationships between type 1 diabetes (i.e. childhood diabetes), bone, and sex hormones in women. She is expanding her research to study differences between men and women in complications of type 1 diabetes (specifically bone fragility and cardiovascular disease) and treatments for type 1 diabetes (specifically islet cell transplantation). Dr. Danielson’s current research program encompasses two interrelated and synergistic projects: Project 1: The Bidirectional Association between Type 1 Diabetes and Bone in Population-Based and Islet Transplant Cohorts; and Project 2: Sex Based Differences in Islet Function and Transplant Clinical Outcomes.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred: Honors College student, interested in public health or medicine, junior or senior standing, with coursework in biology, chemistry, and calculus. Coursework in women studies and/or statistics strongly preferred. Students who are working toward applying to medical school and/or graduate school in public health or biomedical research are also strongly preferred. Minimum GPA of 3.75.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Participate in clinical or basic science research depending on the interests of the student and the current research needs of the project. Work at least 10/hrs per week, attend regular lab meetings, and assist the team of research staff and graduate students. Develop and conduct a small research project (with faculty guidance) that is part of the overall research of the lab, and present the results at the annual UIC Undergraduate Research Forum. The ultimate goal would to be a co-author and have his/her research included in a peer-reviewed manuscript.

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Houshang Darabi

Email Address: hdarabi@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Secondary Department: Computer Science
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 2055 ERF M/C 251 Phone: 9966593
Webpage: http://www.mie.uic.edu/faculty/darabi.htm
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Healthcare Management, Operations Research, Work Productivity Analysis, Discrete Event Systems, Supply Chain Networks, Computer Integrated Manufacturing, Manufacturing Information Systems, Programmable Logic controllers and Supervisory Control

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
At all levels, engineering or business or healthcare informatics majors

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Contact the professor for more information.

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Julie Susan Darnell

Email Address: jdarnell@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Health Policy Administration
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1603 W. Taylor St. Room 758 Phone: 6-2712
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Free and charitable clinics. Free and charitable clinics are private, nonprofit organizations that provide a range of medical, dental, behavioral health, and pharmacy services to mostly uninsured and underinsured persons at little or no cost. They are financially supported largely by private donors and rely on volunteers to deliver care.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
minimum 3.0 GPA, strong communication skills, familiarity with Excel and Word, ability to work independently

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Responsibilities include: Contacting free/charitable clinics around the county (by phone, email and internet searches) to collect and/or verify clinics' operational status and contact information for an ongoing web-based survey; Entering information into a standardized form; Performing administrative tasks such as preparing mailing labels and assembling mail correspondence; Making reminder calls to encourage respondents to fill out the survey.

What You’ll Learn: This project will introduce you to free and charitable clinics--important yet vastly understudied members of the primary care safety net that serve some of our nation’s most vulnerable and underserved residents. You will learn about what free/charitable clinics do, and how they do it in the aftermath of the Affordable Care Act. And you’ll learn about what it takes to administer a web-based survey.

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Somnath Das

Email Address: sdas@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Accounting
Title: Professor
Office: 2313 UH M/C 006 Phone: 9964482
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~sdas

Research Interest:
Capital Markets/Investors use or misuse of published accounting information; Health care management and cost control.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Accounting, finance or economics majors

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Bhaskar DasGupta

Email Address: bdasgup@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 933 SEO Phone: 355-1319
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/~dasgupta
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Bioinformatics, Economics and Games, Approximation Algorithms

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred major: Computer Science, Mathematics, Electrical Engineering or Bioengineering



Prerequisite: CS 201/202, preferably CS 301 and CS 401



Prefer honors college student

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Survey literature; discuss and informally present state-of-the-art

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Lennard Davis

Email Address: lendavis@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Secondary Department: Disability and Human Development
Title: Distinguished Professor
Office: 2020 Phone: 28910
Webpage: http://www.lennarddavis.com
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Disability Studies, Cultural Studies, Biopolitics

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
English major, honors college, junior or senior.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will assist in assembling research materials and assisting in various aspects of my work including organizing visits of outside speakers, helping organize editorial and scholarly activities, etc.

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Benjamin Dawson

Email Address: dawsonb@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Theatre and Music
Secondary Department: Theatre and Music
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor, Production Manager
Office: 1040 W. Harrison St. L232 Phone: (312) 996-52
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Safe and efficient methods of theatre production.
Execution of technical processes within the entertainment industry.
Maintenance and advancement of shop studio and performance facilities.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
THTR 150 prerequisite
Preferred Theatre Majors, any discipline

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will work with shop staff to produce 2 theatre productions per semester in accordance with the designs of each team. Students will learn and use a myriad of skills in the course of this work, including but not limited to woodwork, metalwork, painting, theatrical rigging, electrical work as it pertains to the theatre industry. Students should be prepared to be physical and get dirty. Group and individual projects will be assigned.

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Sandy De Groote

Email Address: sgroote@uic.edu
College: University Library Department: University Library
Title: Scholarly Communications Librarian
Phone: 312-413-9494
Webpage: http://library.uic.edu/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
My current research relates to the impact of online health sciences resources on the use of print and online publications. Studying the use of publications over time from the period prior to the introduction of online end-user databases and online journals to their proliferation inform about differences between disciplines, scholarly publishing patterns, and trends useful to health sciences libraries. I have examined the impact of online journals on the use of the print journal collection, the impact of online journals on the citation patterns of health sciences faculty, and investigated users awareness of databases and online journals and the frequency of their use.

I will now begin to study the cross-disciplinary nature of research. Specifically, I will study the impact of online journals on the cross-disciplinary citation patterns of health sciences faculty (nursing, pharmacy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, medicine and dentistry). My questions is: now that we have multiple online databases and online journals, are faculty more likely to cite journals outside of their specific disciplines, more than they did prior to the introduction of online journals and databases? Students with an interest and/or background in the health sciences are welcome to contact me at sgroote@uic.edu about a research experience on this topic.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
The topic is likely to fit best juniors and seniors and with an interest in the health sciences, although any student who can demonstrate interest is welcome. Ability to use Excel, to search websites, search library catalogs, and search online databases proficiently are required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The research entails searching the Web of Science to identifying articles written by faculty in the health sciences at UIC. The study will focus on examining the references found in the retrieved articles. The online status of the cited journals and their primary disciplines will be noted. References cited in articles written prior to the proliferation of online databases and online journals will be compared to the cited references of later articles where literature searching primarily relies on online databases and journals to determine if there has been an increase in articles cited beyond one discipline.

The learning outcomes from this research experience are:

1. Students will be able to identify and collect data relevant to citation analysis

2. Students will be able to summarize and explain findings from the data analysis.

Observation and review of the student's data identification and collection will assess success at the first outcome. A written report and presentation at a research event on campus will be the basis for assessment of success at the second and third outcomes.

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Marina Del Rios

Email Address: mdelrios@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Emergency Medicine
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 808 South Wood Street, 476C Phone: 312-355-0297
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Del Rios has an interest in health equity interventions to promote cardiovascular health. Interested students can participate in any of the following projects: identifying the prevalence of asymptomatic hypertensive target organ injury in patients with elevated blood pressures in the emergency department (ED), novel use of advanced ultrasound applications for improving diagnostic certainty and goal directed therapy in the ED, developing cardiovascular risk screening strategies in non-clinical settings for the general population, and delivery of health promotion activities to promote cardiovascular health equity in vulnerable populations.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest and enthusiasm for research and Emergency Medicine are important. Time management and accountability are essential, as the student may work on more than one project and/or task at once. Student must be in good standing and in his/her second year of undergraduate education or above. Introductory courses in biology and/or chemistry and writing must have been completed prior to participating in this research opportunity. Any previous research experience with human subjects is appreciated, but not a requirement.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student must be willing to work outside of traditional office hours as much of the research tasks are performed in the emergency department setting. Student will assist with participant screening and recruitment, data acquisition, data entry, and other research-related tasks.

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Primal deLanerolle

Email Address: primal@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Physiology and Biophysics
Office: E207A MSB M/C 901 Phone: 9966430

Research Interest:
The cytoskeleton in signal transduction; Regulation of gene expression by cytoskeletal dynamics; The role of nuclear actin and myosin in transcription.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Enthusiasm and self confidence.

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Sybil Jean Derrible

Email Address: derrible@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Civil and Materials Engineering
Secondary Department: Computer Science
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 2071 ERF Phone: 312 996 2429
Webpage: https://csun.uic.edu/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The mission of the Complex and Sustainable Urban Networks (CSUN) Lab is to advance scientific knowledge and create software for the design of smart, sustainable, and resilient cities. Towards this mission, we look at the planning, design, and modeling of all urban infrastructure systems, including water / wastewater system, the electricity grid, the telecommunication system, the building stock, or the transportation system.

At CSUN, we particularly like to pursue innovative work that might include latest computational techniques such as machine learning, text mining, network science, and geographic information systems (GIS) - which students do not have to know before joining CSUN, but they may learn it depending on the project.

In the past, we have had undergraduate students model urban systems (using industry software), measure flows of energy and resources at The Plant (in Chicago), 3D scan and print objects, develop online software - some of these works even produced scientific articles.

Generally, we are flexible on the topic being researched, but we only accept passionate students who are determined to build a better world that is smart, sustainable, and resilient.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Any skills as long as it comes with passion.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Expectations vary based on student.

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Todd D. Destigter

Email Address: tdestig@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1902 UH M/C 162 Phone: 4131043
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
English Education; Literacy; Ethnography; Education of Latino Students. Essentially, I'm interested in the intersection of literacy education, politics, and culture. Most of my research involves working with high school students and teachers, observing what they do and why, and then analyzing these activities in terms of the political, cultural, and theoretical commitments they represent. My most current research projects involve AP Composition classes at Benito Juarez High School in Pilsen and an alternative high school housed in the Mexico Solidarity Network in Albany Park for Latino adult English language learners.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
Basic acquaintance with library and ethnographic research; Interest in education and public policy

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Provide material and information regarding the histories of the communities in which we're conducting research. This will involve library research and may also require seeking out and interviewing community leaders and activists.

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Natasha Devroye

Email Address: devroye@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: SEO 1039 Phone: 312 996 1013
Webpage: https://www.ece.uic.edu/Devroye/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Information theory: a mathematical theory describing the fundamental limits of data storage, and communication / transmission. I work on network information theory, which describes how much data we can communicate over networks. At any given time, I have various research projects going on, and I will carve out a problem to meet the student's interest. The student may (or may not, depending on the project) interact with my Ph.D. students.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9

Qualifications of a Student:
I require a grade A in ECE 341.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I expect mathematical maturity, and a desire to experience research. Most students will first have to do a literature survey to see what is known. Then we will formulate an open problem together and the student will be tasked with discovering something new about that problem. The goal will be to produce, or help produce a conference paper.

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Barbara Di Eugenio

Email Address: bdieugen@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Title: Professor
Office: 916 SEO M/C 152 Phone: 9967566
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/~bdieugen
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Natural language interfaces to computer systems (ie, development of systems that can talk with human users); Educational Technology (ie computer systems that can tutor or act as classmates); Machine learning; Human computer interaction; Artificial intelligence

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Two kinds of assistants are sought:

a. Majors in computer science who can help with software development.

b. Majors in psychology or English (with minor in linguistics) to help with language data analysis and user studies.

In both cases, junior or senior standing (exceptionally, sophomores will be considered).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
CS majors: help with software development of different types, mostly to endow computer systems with the capability to understand and produce English. Sometimes we use existing packages and we adapt them to our needs, sometimes we start from scratch.

Psychology / English majors: we collect language data between users (eg, a tutor and a student asking for assistance), then we need to transcribe and annotate this data with codes. We also evaluate our systems with users, running user studies akin controlled studies in psychology. The URA will help with either data analysis or with the user experiments, or both.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Luisa DiPietro

Email Address: ldipiet@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Periodontics
Title: Professor
Office: 401B DENT Phone: 312 355 0432
Webpage: http://dentistry.uic.edu/depts/research/faculty/DiPietro_Luisa.cfm
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our lab is interested in the incredible process by which humans heal wounds. Our ability to heal wounds is essential to our survival, yet this process often goes awry with resulting scar formation or failure to heal. Our lab is trying to uncover the molecular mechanisms that guide healing. The students and fellows in our lab are working to find the regulatory controls distinguish healing from true and perfect tissue regeneration. Our long term goal is to improve healing outcomes in patients who experience excessive scar formation or who suffer from non-healing wounds. Our lab has a friendly and open environment. We emphasize clear communication, respect for one another, integrity, and teamwork.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing, biology background, some laboratory coursework completed

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be paired with a graduate student or fellow to learn techniques, but are expected to gain independence over time. Students must have a commitment to completing a project and to being engaged in lab activities. A sense of humor is a plus; a sense of personal responsibility is a must.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Ali R Djalilian

Email Address: adjalili@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1091 COMRB Phone: 3129968936
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Corneal wound healing, stem cells, epithelial regeneration

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
prefer biology major

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
participate in ongoing research projects

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Molly Doane

Email Address: mdoane@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Anthropology
Secondary Department: Latin American and Latino Studies
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 2128 BSB Phone: 413-0653
Webpage: https://anth.uic.edu/uic-anthropology/people/faculty/mdoane
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am currently seeking research assistants for an interdisciplinary research project in Chicago called "Cultivating Wellbeing: the cultural and ecological effects of urban gardens in Chicago." Working with faculty from Biology, Community Medicine, and the Field Museum, I am carrying out ethnographic field research and interviews with community gardeners. We are interested in the role gardening and gardens play in promoting a sense of place, community, autonomy and control, and improving mental and physical health. We are also interested in whether and how gardeners value nature, and the benefits they perceive from interacting with plants and wildlife in gardens. We work in 24 sites across the city. Gardeners come from the full range of racial, ethnic, and national groups present in the city.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 7

Qualifications of a Student:
Therefore, we are particularly interested in student interns who come from a range of backgrounds, and who speak languages other than English. Spanish, Arabic, Swahili, Nepali, and Burmese speakers would be especially welcome on the project, but all interested students are encouraged to apply. Experience in transcription is welcome, but not necessary. Students should have excellent writing and reading skills.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Activities include carrying out ethnographic research, interviewing, coding and transcription of qualitative, in depth-interviews. Students will have opportunity to be mentored in presenting research poster or other presentation.

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Geri Donenberg

Email Address: gdonenberg@psych.uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Professor, Director of Healthy Youths Program and Community Outreach Intervention Projects
Office: M/C Phone: 9968602
Webpage: http://www.psych.uic.edu/hyp

Research Interest:
HIV/AIDS risk and prevention among youth in psychiatric care
HIV/AIDS prevention among juvenile offenders
Family-based HIV/AIDS prevention
Global HIV/AIDS prevention research -- Africa
HIV/AIDS prevention with injection drug users

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Psychology classes and experience working with youth.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Year long commitment
Careful, timely, reliable, and detail oriented
Good interpersonal skills

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Samuel Dorevitch

Email Address: sdorevit@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1059 Phone: 3123553629
Webpage: 1603 W Taylor St
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Water quality, environmental microbiology

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Prior experience in qPCR analysis.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Laboratory analyses of water samples using the qPCR method.

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Alison F Doubleday

Email Address: adouble@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 527 Phone: 312-355-4010
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Educational research, Technology use in education, Collaborative Learning, Health Professions Education,

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
junior or senior year in college preferred, social science majors or biology majors preferred, prior experience with Adobe photoshop and with basic statistics a plus but not essential.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The research assistant will assist in the development of digital educational resources, and in the maintenance and analysis of survey data. Additionally, the research assistant may also be asked to participate in literature searches related to resource development projects.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Tom Driver

Email Address: tgd@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 3020B Phone: 312-996-9672
Webpage: http://www.chem.uic.edu/driver
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research group is focused on the rational development of new transition metal-catalyzed methods that selectively transform simple molecules into functionalized N-heterocycles. Towards that end we are interested in (1) exploring the chemistry of azides and (2) functionalizing traditionally unreactive C–H bonds.

We have recently discovered a number of transition metal-catalyzed methods, which enable the conversion of azides to a variety of important N-heterocycles. We aim to elucidate the mechanism through which these processes operate and develop new methods based on our mechanistic conclusions.

In addition to the development of new reactions that involve azides, my group is also interested in using our methods to synthesize biologically active small molecules and N-heterocyclic semi-conductor for use in photovoltaics.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
minimum gpa 3.5
preferred major: Chemistry or Biochemistry
year in college: freshman, sophomore, junior
no prior experience required

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will work closely with one of my graduate students. Once the student is trained, they will be given their own independent research project. In addition to working in the lab, I expect that the student will also attend our weekly group meetings. The student will be given the opportunity to present their research accomplishments at a national chemistry meeting.

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Robert Druzinsky

Email Address: druzinsk@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Secondary Department: Orthodontics
Title: Clinical Associate Professor
Office: 565C Phone: 312-996-0406
Webpage: http://www.experts.scival.com/uic/expert.asp?n=Robert+Druzinsky&u_id=539
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Bioinformatics;
Evolution of mammals (particularly rodents and primates); functional anatomy and neurophysiology of mastication (chewing and biting); evolution and mechanical properties of teeth; plasticity of muscle (how muscles respond to increases and decreases in use).

Techniques: animal dissections, immunohistochemistry, Western blots, microscopy

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Working knowledge of Labview essential;

Preferences: honors college students with prior lab experience; experience with dissections; 3.0 minimum GPA; Work-Study eligible

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Enthusiasm, willingness to learn, self-motivation, interest in anatomy, evolution, and neuroscience.

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Xiaoping Du

Email Address: xdu@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pharmacology
Office: E417 MSB M/C 868 Phone: 3550237

Research Interest:
Platelets; Vascular biology; Thrombosis; Molecular biology; Pharmacology

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Senior standing

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David DuBois

Email Address: dldubois@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Community Health Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 977 SPHPI M/C 975 Phone: 4139806
Webpage: http://www.cade.uic.edu/sphapps/faculty_profile/facultyprofile.asp?i=dldubois

Research Interest:
Preventive interventions for youth focusing on self-esteem and mentoring.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Course work in social and behavioral sciences is desirable.

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David Dumas

Email Address: ddumas@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
Title: Professor
Office: SEO 503
Webpage: http://dumas.io/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Riemann surfaces, Teichmuller theory, hyperbolic geometry, and other geometric structures in 2- and 3-dimensional spaces.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Many projects I organize focus on mathematical visualization and require some programming experience (often Python or C# are used) and some mathematical background (typically calculus, linear algebra, and math 215 or concurrent registration).

The specific project I am conducting in fall 2018 has the following prerequisites:

Some 3D graphics programming experience is required. The ideal candidate would have experience with the Unity 3D engine, would be familiar with software version control systems (e.g. git), and would have taken a linear algebra course.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
In Fall 2018 I am organizing an undergraduate research project titled "Destructive Topology: Slicing Surfaces in VR". Detailed information about this project can be found at:

http://mcl.math.uic.edu/fall-2018-projects/#destop

In short, this project will focus on building software for visualizing cross sections of surfaces in space in virtual reality. The deadline to apply to this project is August 31, 2018. Application instructions can be found at

http://mcl.math.uic.edu/apply/

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Christine Dunford

Email Address: cdunfo1@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Theatre and Music
Title: Associate Chair
Office: L010 Phone: 312-413-7642
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Research interests include connections between creative performance, memory and well-being. Specifically, I co-founded a program called the Memory Ensemble that use performance activities and improvisation to improve quality of life for people with memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Qualifications include some experience with qualitative research (e.g. interview, participant observation). Student must be detail oriented and self-directed.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will research/write a literature review of related work conducted in the fields of theatre, performance studies. etc. In addition, student might transcribe recordings of Memory Ensemble sessions. Student may need to complete IRB training.

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Karen V Dunn Lopez

Email Address: kdunnl2@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Health Systems Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 952
Webpage: https://www.nursing.uic.edu/faculty-staff/karen-dunn-lopez-phd-mph
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am a health informatics researcher. I focus on health information technologies, especially improving usability and usefulness. I often collaborate with engineering faculty including:human factors, computer science, systems and cognitive.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Health sciences or education student
Pre-requisite- Statistics

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I have 2 ongoing projects to involve students in. The data is collected and we are in the analysis phase. I will involve students based on their interest in data management, data analysis and literature reviews.

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Yogesh Dwivedi

Email Address: ydwivedi@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Associate Professor (RT) of Psychiatry
Office: 307S ISPI M/C 912 Phone: 4134557
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Molecular Neuroscience; Molecular mechanisms associated with depression and suicide; Neuropharmacology; Neuroscience

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Biological Sciences major; Senior standing

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Jon Dykens

Email Address: jdykens@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Medical Education
Title: Assistant Professor of Clinical Family Medicine
Office: 1919 W Taylor #165 Phone: 312-772-2876
Webpage: http://www.globalcommunityhealth.org
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Global Health: Local community health systems service delivery policy development through an innovative partnership model. Specifically, we are currently studying the development of cervical cancer preventive services in Kedougou, Senegal and will begin the development of a secondary program in the Dominican Republic.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Honors college student preferred

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Roles and responsibilities will be discussed prior to acceptance and is dependent upon the current need.

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Shane Ebert

Email Address: sebert2@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies
Office: 1728 UH
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research centers on understanding properties of language (particularly syntax) by studying bilinguals. Much of my data is drawn from code-switching, though I also have an interest in other sources of linguistic evidence. I mostly focus on early and simultaneous bilinguals, although I also look at late bilinguals, i.e. second language (L2) learners.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Dave Eddington

Email Address: dte@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: SEO 211 Phone: 5-3278
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/bml
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our research lab focuses on developing novel solutions to current unmet experimental and clinical needs through applying simple microfabricated devices. These devices leverage beneficial phenomena (e.g. process integration, fast diffusion, or high surface to volume ratio) over multiple scales (e.g. nano, micro, and meso) to effectively leverage the power of scale without becoming overly complex.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA = 2.75, sophomore or later

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Assist in experiments, fabricate devices, collect data, work independantly.

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Alexander Eisenschmidt

Email Address: aeisensc@mac.com
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Architecture
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: School of Architecture (MC 030) Phone: 312-996-3335
Webpage: http://www.AEisenschmidt.com
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Relationship between city and architecture (from the metropolis to the contemporary global city); dynamism between architectural space and the networks and infrastructures of the city; urban interiors within the metropolis; productive rethinking of the modern city as a springboard for architectural speculation

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
3rd or 4th year student in architecture, urban design, or graphic design

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will assist on the research for a book project, entitled The Good Metropolis, which focuses on the productive tension between the modern city and architectural form. Students will help with research in the library, analyzing drawings, and diagramming urban scenarios. This research might also find its way into exhibitions.

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Kamal Eldeirawi

Email Address: keldei1@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Health Systems Science
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 956 Phone: 312-413-9792
Webpage: http://www.nursing.uic.edu/faculty-staff/kamal-eldeirawi-phd-rn
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Eldeirawi’s current program of research focuses on multilevel modifiable risk factors for chronic conditions, including asthma, in children from underserved and immigrant populations. His research investigates:
1) Risk factors for asthma and other respiratory conditions in children, especially those of Mexican origin;

2) Independent and interactive effects of maternal perinatal nutrition and stress on the risk of asthma and respiratory symptoms in Mexican American children;

3) How diet, lifestyle, and other environmental and lifestyle factors change by migration and acculturation and the effects of these changes on the risk of asthma, obesity, and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in children;

4) Associations of neighborhoods social and physical environments with asthma, respiratory conditions, and asthma risk factors;

and 5) Respiratory conditions in Arab Americans.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Smart, flexible, committed students who want to learn about research related to asthma. Min. GPA 3.00. Bilingual (English/Spanish) or (English/Arabic) is a plus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be expected to conduct literature reviews, assist with presentations and manuscript preparation, attend research meetings, conduct patient interviews, abstract data from medical records, distribute and collect surveys, enter data in computerized databases, help create surveys, and other related activities. The student has to undergo IRB training and be approved by the IRB before participating in the aspects of the research that require contact with patients and/or their information.

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Enrique F Elli

Email Address: eelli@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Surgery
Secondary Department: Surgery
Title: Director of Bariatric Program. Assistant Professor of Surgery
Office: 840 South Wood Street 435 E Phone: 312-431-9659
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our bariatric program research team has interests in the following areas:
- morbid obesity- comorbidities associated with obesity and resolution of comorbidities post surgery
- types and outcomes of bariatric surgery
- role of age, ethnicity, and other demographic and socio-cultural variables in obese patients pre and post-surgery
- bariatric surgery in transplant patients
- plastic surgery post-bariatric surgery

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8-20 (flexible and negotiable)

Qualifications of a Student:
High school education required; coursework in the health, social sciences, psychology, and/or related field required; interest in research conducted by the Bariatric Surgery Research team; prefer some experience in the field of study relevant to the research being conducted; excellent computer knowledge; excellent database management; experience in internet searches and literature searches; demonstrated written and verbal communication skills.
Additional skills: ability to work as a team and also work independently; above average organizational skills, ability to conduct detailed work with great accuracy and attention to detail.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Assist in conducting research as part of the bariatric surgery research team. Assist with database management, database entry/verification, literature searches, and retrieving articles. Depending on interest and experience, assist with conference presentations and manuscript preparation. Work with the project coordinator and database manager to ensure quality control of the data.

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Kathryn Engel

Email Address: engel@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Psychology
Title: Director of Internships in Applied Psychology
Office: 1018A BSB M/C 285 Phone: 4130456
Webpage: http://psch.uic.edu/psychology/app
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
There are two types of projects available, one is completing programs evaluation research at one of the many Applied Psychology Program internship sites as a second semester experience following enrollment in PSCH 385. Program evaluation field projects are strong matches for Honors College Capstone projects.

The other projects evaluate cultural training of psychological interviewers, international professional exchanges and long term happy couples.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6-9

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of 242, 343 and 381/382/386 with grades of A.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will complete IRB training, and help with qualitative and quantitative coding of data on ongoing projects. Students will attend journal discussions and write a short paper.

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Stephen G Engelmann

Email Address: sengelma@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Political Science
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1108B BSB M/C Phone: 4133781
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
I am doing revisions for a book manuscript on political theory, social science, and biology, and will need help soon with research for a project on economic rationality.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Excellent (English) reading skills are needed, philosophical/theoretical interests are a plus

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Joel Epstein

Email Address: jepstein@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
Office: 556 DENT M/C Phone: 9967480

Research Interest:
Clinical research in cancer patients related to oral complications of treatment and diagnosis; involving all aspects of administrative, data collection, data entry and analysis.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in the above, and skills in some aspect of the above.

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Edna Erez

Email Address: eerez@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Criminology, Law, and Justice
Title: Professor
Office: BSB 4th floor Phone: 312 996 5262
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Victims of crime; domestic violence; ; use of electronic monitoring technology to protect battered women; victim participation in criminal justice proceeding; women in crime and terrorism; comparative criminology.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Social science students preferred; being an Honor College student is a plus. Familiarity with research methods, good analytical and writing skills. Interest in reading and coding interviews.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Literature research; coding of interview data; data interpretation and analysis.

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Jakob L Eriksson

Email Address: jakob@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: ERF 2054 Phone: 3122134103
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/Jakob
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Operating systems, concurrent computing, cluster and high performance computing. Compiler instrumentation and programming language runtimes for deterministic multi-threaded execution.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Computer Science Major with 3.5+ GPA in CS courses or demonstrable significant programming experience. Ideally with A's in CS361 and CS461 (Operating Systems).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Most projects will involve a significant programming portion, likely modifying existing benchmarks programs to work with new approaches, runninge experiments on large computer systems.

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Danilo Erricolo

Email Address: derric1@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: 1111 SEO M/C 154 Phone: 3129965771
Webpage: http://www.ece.uic.edu/bin/view/ECE/ProfileErricolo
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Applied electromagnetism for applications related to imaging, metamaterials, propagation, scattering, and antenna design.

Some information about our laboratory is found at http://andrewlab.engr.uic.edu/

and some additional information about our research activities is obtained by looking at our publications listed at

https://erricolo.engr.uic.edu/

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Interested students must have a command of the English language at the level of a native speaker and must have completed English 160, English 161, and have working knowledge of Matlab and Microsoft Power Point.

Experience with LaTex typsetting is preferred, but not required.

Background in electromagnetics is preferred (ECE 322).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will assist in the preparation of scientific articles and scientific presentations by editing content and images.

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Medi Eslani

Email Address: medi@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: 1905 W Taylor St. LEIRI Room 213
Webpage: http://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/cms/One.aspx?portalId=506244&pageId=25135067
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Mesenchymal stem cells for ocular surface reconstruction

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
A qualified individual who has some previous hands-on experience in biological research with basic knowledge in cell biology, molecular biology, and sanitary techniques.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Motivated, focused, goal-oriented students able to thrive in an environment of mentoring and self-directed learning.

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Alissa Eugeni

Email Address: eugeni@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Infectious Diseases
Title: Administrative Director
Office: 808 S Wood, Rm 888 CME Phone: 6-8380
Webpage: http://go.uic.edu/infectiousdiseases
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
HIV primary care and mental health services
LGBT
Underserved populations
Substance abuse

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Committed students who want to learn about research in the field of HIV

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The HIV/AIDs Community Clinic Network(HCCN) is searching for dedicated students to assist with certain aspects of our project:

Clinic coordination: This person serves as the point-person at our outreach clinic sites, acting as a liaison between our clinical staff and case management. Some duties include: monitoring clinic flow, conducting appointment reminder calls, documenting failed visits for the clinical team, completing patient eligibility forms, providing patients in need of other community services with referrals(housing, substance abuse, legal, etc), and other duties as assigned.

Duties: reception, data collection, EMR chart extraction
Qualities: Reliable, detail-oriented, organized, ability to work in a team environment. Bilingual Spanish/English highly regarded.

Data coordination: This person will assist our administrative team with the collection, reporting and monitoring of client level data.

Duties: data collection and reporting, EMR chart extraction, data analysis, quality management
Qualities: reliable, detail-oriented, organized. Experience with Excel, Access and Cerner EMR.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Alessandra Eustaquio

Email Address: ase@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 4352
Webpage: https://eustaquio.lab.uic.edu/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Drug discovery, microbiology, biosynthesis, genetic engineering, synthetic biology.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred majors: Biology, Chemistry, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and related disciplines.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Motivation and enthusiasm to work in a new lab that addresses questions related to drug discovery and development from natural sources.

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Olga Evdokimov

Email Address: evdolga@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Physics
Title: Associate Professor
Office: SES 2264 Phone: *63413
Webpage: http://tigger.uic.edu/~evdolga/index.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am specializing in the High Energy Nuclear Physics. I take part in experimental studies of phase structure of hadronic matter with STAR Experiment at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Located at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, NY, RHIC is the first particle accelerator in the world capable of colliding heavy ions. Together with many physicists from all over the world we study matter under extreme temperatures and densities in order to better understand how our Universe might have looked like right after its creation.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Prospective candidates will be evaluated based on their academic performance, employment and research experience. Preference will be given to the student majors in the following order: (1) physics, (2) engineering, and (3) other science major. Highly motivated students with other majors are also encouraged to apply.
Programming experience (especially familiarity with C++) is a plus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The work planned as a part of ongoing research program within large international collaboration of physicists on the STAR experiment at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.
The research project will be related to the studies of nuclear matter under extreme conditions.
Students can opt to get UIC credit for Physics 392, Physics Research.

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Sue Farruggia

Email Address: spf@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Administration
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Assistant Vice Provost for Undergraduate Affairs
Office: UH2704 Phone: 312-996-8115
Webpage: http://orss.uic.edu/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Student success in college
Mentoring of college students
Transition from high school to college
Non-academic reasons for leaving college
Racial/ethnic disparities in college success

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum 2.75 GPA

Experience may be most beneficial to majors in psychology, education, or other social science, but all are welcome to apply.

Preference given to students who can make a two semester commitment.

Students interested in pursuing an honors capstone project and/or attending graduate school in psychology, education or a related social science are encouraged to apply.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students working in the Office for Research on Student Success will work on a variety of activities depending upon the semester, such as:

Transcribing interviews and focus groups
Coding qualitative data
Collecting data
Conducting literature searches
Helping conduct focus groups
Helping college survey data
Data processing

Students will be expected to participate in weekly lab meetings.

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Alan Feinerman

Email Address: feinerma@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Office: 3019 ERF M/C 154 Phone: 9962313
Webpage: http://www.mal.uic.edu

Research Interest:
Fabrication and characterization of field emission devices based on carbon
nano tubes and other nano structures.

Fabrication and characterization of granular materials and investigation of
their transport properties.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
ECE or physics background would be helpful but is not essential.

Completion of ECE 347 and ECE/ME 449 would be great.

Students need to take careful measurements and possibly fabricate samples at UIC's MEMS/Nano facility.

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Evelyn Marie Figueroa

Email Address: efigue@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Family Medicine
Title: Associate Professor of Clinical Family Medicine
Office: 312-413-4168 Phone: 773-251-4575
Webpage: http://residency.dfm.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
COMMUNITY-BASED FOOD INSECURITY RESEARCH. With medical students from UIC, Family Medicine is collaborating with other departments and graduate schools to assess and address the effects of food insecurity on our UIC community. Our student will help many-fold: 1) to help identify people at risk of food insecurity in our UIC clinics; 2) to help design a food access point for UI Health Clinics and Mile Square Health Center; 3) to access the effects of secondary health and social outcomes (diabetic control, truancy from school, etc) on the beneficiaries of better access to food. This pilot data will inform the research group in order to qualify for a large federal sustainability grant.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA 3.0; Typing 40wpm; Knowledge of Microsoft Office, including Excel; Interest in public health or medicine; Spanish fluency helpful but not required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
My ideal student would (under close supervision - we can train the student as long as the student can effectively use Microsoft Office): 1)Help collect baseline food insecurity data in a cross section of UI Health clinics; 2) Maintain the budget for the food insecurity project; 3) Attend meetings with community contacts and organizational partners (including recording minutes); 4) Help design the food access point; 5) Help coordinate activity schedule; 6) Help summarize data; 7) Help contact patients afterwords to track secondary outcomes; 8) Help prepare program manuscript and submit to local/regional/national meetings; 9) Help start federal grant to sustain a food insecurity program at UI Health.

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Alexandra Filindra

Email Address: aleka@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Political Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: BSB 1108D Phone: 8482181943
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Filindra's research focuses on immigration policy in the United States and elsewhere. Her main normative concern is to develop new, research-based ways to combat racism and prejudice.

She is especially interested in understanding the political, social and economic roots of anti-immigrant prejudice and why people support restrictive laws such as the Arizona or the Alabama immigration laws. Furthermore, her work looks at the rise of the extreme right in Europe and especially in Greece.

Another key interest is border enforcement and deterrence theory. Her work problematizes the "rational actor" assumption of border and domestic immigration enforcement policies.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
If you are interested in working with me, you should have at least 3.5 GPA, a major in political science, psychology, sociology or economics and at least two semesters of quantitative methods and statistics. Fluency in Spanish is a big bonus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students who work with me will be expected to do a combination of the following:

1. help with the data collection for a major legislative database of immigration bills and laws across all 50 states;
2. transcribe interviews;
3. participate in interviews;
4. assist with literature review
5. help create charts and figures from data

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Marian Fitzgibbon

Email Address: manton6@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pediatrics
Secondary Department: Institute of Health Research and Policy
Title: Professor
Office: IHRP 486 Phone: 3123553895
Webpage: https://www.ihrp.uic.edu/study/mediterranean-diet-weight-loss-and-cognition-obese-older-adults
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Fitzgibbon’s research focuses primarily on health risk reduction in minority and underserved populations. She has conducted obesity prevention trials with preschool children and their parents as well as obesity treatment interventions with women.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Julie Flohr

Email Address: jflohr@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: School of Architecture
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Phone: 773 710 4292
Webpage: http://www.oisse.com
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research is centered around design activities that look at various model systems: live physical models, parametric digital models, and material properties/behavior models. The research organizes disciplinary projections that depart from the above stated interests and is primarily expressed through drawing, animating, model making, and writing.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Looking for motivated Architecture major undergraduate student who enjoys design, is very curious, and presents good general knowledge of Rhinoceros and Grasshoper. Great drawing and rendering skills a plus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
On-going research is looking at ways by which architecture's physical ability to organize systems can run con-currently with digitally based user-interaction and graphic systems - this work is being developed towards applications for the production and curation of a mobile history gallery.

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Katharine Floros

Email Address: kmfloros@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Political Science
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Office: 1170B BSB
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Negotiations between civil war participants

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should have at least a 3.0 GPA and have taken at least one course in international relations or related fields.

Highly motivated sophomores will be accepted, but juniors and seniors are preferred, especially those who are considering an advanced degree that requires a large research component.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will spend the majority of their research time in the library using text and computer sources to uncover details about negotiations and negotiation attempts between belligerents in civil wars in the post-WWII period. Students will complete an information template which will guide the student in the type of information needed. Students should return completed sheets to the professor as soon as they are completed. Students need to work consistently throughout the semester.

Intensive research and patient persistence are expected and required.

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Marquis Foreman

Email Address: mdforemn@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Biobehavioral Health Science
Office: 108 NURS M/C 802 Phone: 9968443
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/nursing/facultypages/Marquis_Foreman.shtml

Research Interest:
Illness and Aging

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Steven Forman

Email Address: slf@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Earth and Environmental Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 2456 SES M/C 186 Phone: 4139404
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Environmental earth sciences; Climate change, droughts, floods, geoarchaeology, and Great Lakes science

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Sophomore, junior, or senior standing; Grade point average of at least 3.0 in math and science

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Craig Foster

Email Address: fosterc@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Civil and Materials Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 3085 ERF Phone: 312-996-8086
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/cme/people/faculty/fosterc.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
For 2016-2017 I am seeking a student to measure material properties of soils for tracked vehicle analysis. The ultimate goal of the project to predict from material testing whether a given vehicle will be able to pass on a given soil. Students will help conducting geotechnical tests and analyzing results.

Other research interests focus on numerical modeling (mostly finite element analysis) of solid and porous solid materials. Soils, rocks, and the cornea and other materials are of interest.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Students performing experimental work should have experience testing soils and concrete, e.g CME 315 and ideally CME 300 or equivalent.

Most likely, applicants will be from Civil, Materials, Mechanical, or Biological Engineering, but others are welcome to apply.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students performing experiments will conduct experiments according to the relevant standards and analyze results. If there is time, students will fit results to material models used for evaluating soils.

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Kharma C Foucher

Email Address: kfouch1@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Kinesiology and Nutrition
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 647 AHS
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/ahs/biomechanics/index.htm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Walking mechanics and physical activity in older adults with musculoskeletal impariments. Students will learn about the research process, about gait analysis and related methodology, and about the factors that may limit physical activity in older adults, through involvement with an ongoing research study in the Biomechanics and Clinical Outcomes (BaCOS) Lab.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9

Qualifications of a Student:
Kinesiology or Bioengineering major. Sophomore or above. Proficiency with Office programs. Strong organizational, interpersonal, and communication skills. Some programming experience helpful.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You will help with subject recruitment, screening, and scheduling, and with data collection and data entry for a project involving physical activity and gait in older adults with and without hip osteoarthritis. Advanced students will design and answer their own research questions using data that have been collected in the BaCOS Lab, and will have the opportunity to prepare an abstract for submission to a professional conference.

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Erin Freeman

Email Address: erinf@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Theatre and Music
Secondary Department: Theatre and Music
Title: Production Manager
Office: L282 Phone: 3129965287
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The construction techniques and fabrication processes of stage properties, furniture, special effects, and the history of early construction methods for these pieces. The research will include construction and fabrication, troubleshooting, and final preparation for properties used in departmental productions. As part of this work, organizational methods and best practice methods for department work will be developed under the supervision of Production Management.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9

Qualifications of a Student:
Theatre Major focusing in Design, Tech, and Production preferred; has taken or is currently taking THTR 150, 182, and 183

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
This position will work with the Production Manager and Technical Director on developing and fabricating properties and specialty items for the department productions and assist Production Manager in the development of organizational planning in the properties area.

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Lisa Freeman

Email Address: lfreeman@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Office: 1933 UH M/C 162 Phone: 3552530
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/engl/faculty/prof/lfreeman/bio.htm

Research Interest:
Eighteenth century British literature and culture; Drama
(On leave for 2005-2006 school year)

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing; Completion of ENGL 241 and 242

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Bernard Friedenson

Email Address: bernief@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 847-827-1958
Webpage: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bernardfriedenson
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Mutations in genes involved in defending the body against cancer viruses and other infections may play a larger role in breast cancer than previously thought.
The genetic sequences of breast cancers from hundreds of different women finds mutations in genes involved in immunity in every one of them. The mutations were different in each of the breast cancers, but every cancer had mutations associated with some aspects of pathogen recognition and defense.
Results are published in Functional & Integrative Genomics, in the Journal of Genomes and Exomes (available at http://www.la-press.com/many-breast-cancer-mutations-parallel-mutations-in-known-viral-cancers-article-a4437), and in proceedings from several national and international conferences. Videos describing the work have also been produced:
How infections can cause breast cancer: Interpreting human breast cancer genomes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1y_arTHw5Q
Preventing hereditary cancers associated with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Gene Mutations
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ht2zg3NbNNg or http://www.scivee.tv/node/39255
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzssHG9hXVM
The findings strongly indicate that gene mutations affecting the immune system play an important role in the development of breast cancer. Viruses such as Human papilloma virus, (HPV), or Epstein-Barr virus have been implicated as causes of breast cancer, and they are known to cause other cancers. But almost every human being is infected with one or more of these viruses and most people never develop symptoms, much less breast cancer. So viruses as causes of breast cancer are highly controversial. Different studies looking for viral causes of breast cancer have reached completely opposite conclusions.
To help explain this controversy, gene mutations in breast cancer cells were identified in breast cancer cells that affect their ability to defend against cancer viruses. The mutations appeared serious enough to have made the breast cancer especially vulnerable. Some mutations were specific for products of viral infection such as the inability to recognize viral DNA or RNA as foreign. Cancer viruses that are normally harmless have become dangerous in breast cancer cells because a damaged or deregulated immune system can no longer control them. The mutations Friedenson identified were spread across many different genes and the sets of mutated genes differed in every breast cancer. But the patterns of mutations fit together neatly into the immune system and showed where it needed reinforcement.
Results prove that breast cancer cells are highly susceptible to tumor virus infection if they have mutations that damage or deregulate their immune system. Certain highly specific antiviral defenses are just missing or disabled. There is large variation among sets of mutations in different breast cancers. Every breast cancer is different and these differences could easily be large enough to explain why trying to find a breast cancer virus has produced such conflicting results. Normal breast cells do not have the increased susceptibility to cancer viruses because the mutations were determined relative to normal human genome reference sequences. Autoimmunity, suggested by some as an alternate explanation, is not sufficient to cause cancer and does not explain increased cancer risks in immunosuppressed patients. Cancer risks can be reduced by anti-inflammatory drugs if inflammation occurs before there is immune system damage or deregulation. Inflammation by itself is not sufficient to cause cancer.
Sequencing the genomes of individual breast cancers initially cost hundreds of millions of dollars. As methods improve, costs have been dropping so dramatically that it now costs about $1000-2000 to obtain raw sequence data from a human genome and this cost continues to fall. This information could help physicians prescribe more targeted and effective treatments. If we know which genes are damaged in a breast cancer patient’ s immune system, prevention or even therapy can be tailored by giving vaccines or perhaps antiviral drugs to reduce the chances of recurrence.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Courses and interest in biochemistry, immunology, molecular genetics, molecular biology, microbiology, medicine, cancer and chemistry, >B average and advanced student at least a junior.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Active interest in research project not involving formal lab work. Strong motivation and ability to work independently. Desire to help people.

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Cynthia Fritschi

Email Address: fritschi@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Biobehavioral Health Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 646 Phone: 312-996-4260
Webpage: http://www.nursing.uic.edu/faculty-staff/cynthia-fritschi-phd-rn-cde
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Diabetes, physical activity, symptom management/assessment, ecological momentary assessment methods, diabetes self-care behaviors. Aging adults. Women's health.

I am currently running a pilot study about the effects of a 12-week walking program on inflammatory markers, fatigue, and sleep in sedentary, obese, women with type 2 diabetes.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
I would prefer a student with a strong interest or major in healthcare related to exercise, behavioral, or nursing sciences. Honor's college preferred, but not necessary. Must have or plan to complete the live UIC OPRS Investigator 101 course or the on-line Collaborative Initial Training Initiative (CITI) course.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Assistance with recruitment and walking intervention. Would be involved in data collection during the study visits and data entry, checking, & cleaning. Working with data management spread sheets (Excel & other).

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Leslie Wo-Mei Fung

Email Address: lfung@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Professor
Office: 4444 SES Phone: 355-5516
Webpage: http://www2.chem.uic.edu/fung/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Biophysical studies of proteins (human brain spectrin and drug-target proteins). Findings from these studies will provide insight toward developing molecular understanding of normal and diseased physiology involving these proteins.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
min GPA: 3.3
prerequisite classes: high school chem and biol, first year college chemistry, biology, physics, or equivalent courses.

A stretch of time available during weekdays rather than 2 hrs each day, for example.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Expect the student to think and analyze scientific information, and to be reliable, organized and disciplined.

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Laura Gabriel

Email Address: lbethgab@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Trained Research Specialist
Office: 3124134584 Phone: 2489351426
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Mood disorders, depression, neuropsychology, neuroimaging

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred major: Psychology
Preferred year: freshman or sophomore
Must be: to work on time, friendly, comfortable speaking on the phone with participants, able to work independently as well as with others, dedicated to the study

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
While this study involves neuropsychological testing, functional MRI, a physical assessment and clinical interview, etc., we primarily need help with recruitment. Recruitment could range from putting up flyers, to posting information about the study on pre-approved online forums, phone screening participants, and organizing baseline study packets for participants. You will also have the opportunity to observe some of the study visits mentioned if you have interest.

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Tatjana Gajic

Email Address: tgajic@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: UH 1705 Phone: 6 8522
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Modern Spanish Literature and Culture

Hispanic Intellectual History

Political Philosophy

Environment and Culture

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
3.5 gpa minimum, major in Spanish, interest in scholarly pursuit in literature and cultural studies, intent on pursuing graduate studies in the humanities

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be asked to conduct research akin to the professor's area of study. This research will entail compiling a bibliography of relevant works, writing critical reports on selected sources, and presenting research results in the form of scholarly essay or presentation.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Antonio Gangemi

Email Address: agangemi@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Surgery
Title: Assistant Professor of Surgery
Office: 840 S. Wood Street, Suite 435E Phone: 312.3551493
Webpage: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/antonio-gangemi/11/76/b68
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I have two main research interests:
- As medical director of the laparoscopic and robotic surgical skills laboratory at UIC, I am currently responsible of the minimally invasive training for the general surgery residents. I strongly believe in multi-disciplinary approach and, on this basis I have started multiple collaborations with scientists and researchers of the Departments of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and Medical Education at UIC and with industries that express interest in surgical education and are willing to support the research and training activities of my laboratory.
- My bariatric surgery practice is based on a geographic area that has a rate of morbid obesity among the highest in the United States. My main clinical research interest focuses on finding a possible surgical cure for diabetes type 2 in obese and overweight patients.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Prior experience with statistical analysis is a plus. Schedule flexibility is a must as the student will be working with a busy general surgeon who must reconcile his research activities with his clinical duties.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I expect the student to have a genuine interest for one of my two main research focuses, to be self-motivated, to demonstrate the ability to work independently whilst showing good communication skills and report progresses and/or seek guidance when needed.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Peter Howard Gann

Email Address: pgann@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pathology
Secondary Department: Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Title: Professor
Office: COMRB 6133 Phone: 312-355-3723
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Our lab is generally engaged in developing and validating new biomarkers in human tissue samples for predicting cancer outcome and response to treatment. Our current projects focus on creating computer vision approaches to detect clinically significant patterns in whole slide digital images. Specifically, we are using deep learning and other machine learning techniques to identify the histological signatures of multiple breast cancer subtypes in a single patient. This involves working with genomic databases and training machine learning classifiers to label different patches within a microscopy image, based on “pure” genomic subtypes. We are testing the general hypothesis that patients whose cancers are admixed will respond less favorably to therapy that is targeted (typically) to a single subtype. We are looking for students with a background in computer engineering, programming and big-data analysis who are excited about working in medical research.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Prefer: freshman, soph or junior students; Honors students; previous experience in medical research.

Must have: GPA at least B+; background in computer engineering, computer science, statistics, or bioengineering.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be assigned duties as a regular member of the research team (commensurate with academic schedule). Depending upon the student's skills and trainability they can learn a variety of techniques either at the computer or at the lab bench (or both!). To build confidence in making presentations, the student will be invited to discuss their work in lab meetings and possibly Division seminars. We expect students to contribute to publishable work and earn co-authorship.

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Feng Gao

Email Address: gaof1@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Accounting
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: UH 2321 Phone: 312-996-4438
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interests involve many areas in accounting
and the financial market. For example, I am interested in economic consequences of new securities regulation, such as the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002. I am also interested in the relation between earnings and returns, especially when earnings are likely managed to meet various benchmarks, such as analyst forecast.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
A candidate must have already taken Accounting 210, with grade B or above. Preferably, a student also finished a few finance courses in the CBA with grade B or above.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I expect the student(s) to be able to read financial reports of public companies, and understand the content of news disclosure. I would provide guidelines on how data would be collected from reading financial information or news, then enter into an excel file. Data collection is an important step in the success of research, and I expect the assistant to provide accurate and prompt information.

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Yu Gao

Email Address: yugao@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Secondary Department: Chemistry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: Pharm 505 Phone: 68087
Webpage: www.pepchem.org
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Development of novel chemical and informatics tools to investigate the proteome and complex biological system. By combining chemical screening, mass spectroscopy-based proteomics/metabolomics, and informatics, Dr. Gao’s research aims to interrogate the proteome and to elucidate protein interactions (including protein-protein and protein-small molecule interaction).

My website is at: http://www.pepchem.org

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
1. Major in chemistry, computer science, biology, engineering, pre-med, pre-pharm, math, or other related fields.

2. Willing to learn at least one of the following:
(1) statistics, computer modeling, machine learning.
(2) molecular biology, cell culture, proteomics.
(3) chemical synthesis.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students are expected to be responsive and work diligently on research project as well as the maintenance of the lab environment. Student are encouraged to apply for fellowships and present research findings at the UIC undergraduate research day.

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Vadim Gaponenko

Email Address: vadimg@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1160 MBRB M/C 669 Phone: 312-355-4965
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Membrane proteins are important targets for therapeutic intervention and are of significant interest to biomedical research in the area of cancer biology. My lab is interested in understanding how protein molecules acquire and perform their function. Functional characteristics of these proteins are encoded in their structure and are revealed in their interactions with other molecules. Membrane binding is undoubtedly involved in determining the structure of membrane proteins and in selecting their functional specifications. A multidisciplinary effort to characterize these interactions in living cells and the ways of their modulation through conformational flexibility will allow efficient therapeutic intervention. My long-term objective is to develop an integrated approach to study macromolecular interactions that involve membrane proteins. This approach will provide answers to such fundamental questions as why biomolecules interact in a specific but versatile manner and how their functions are established in living organisms. In this research my lab utilizes a battery of biochemical and biophysical techniques including solution state NMR, X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, as well as cell biology approaches. Currently, the research in my lab focuses on two main areas: (i) structure-functional relationships of human proto-oncogene K-Ras, which is a peripheral membrane protein, and (ii) understanding structural plasticity guided mechanisms of peptide inhibitors of human chemokine receptor CXCR4.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior level students majoring in Biology, Chemistry, or Biochemistry. Minimum GPA: 3.2.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will work under the direction of senior graduate students or senior research assistants. They will learn laboratory techniques in biochemistry, biophysics, and cell biology, how to design experiments relevant to their projects, and how to communicate their research at lab meetings and in writing. The students who will benefit the most from their reasearch experience in the lab are the ones who are interested in graduate school in biomedical sciences, medical school or MD PhD programs. We expect the students to be committed to spending several semesters in the lab with the aim to produce and publish high quality research.

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Lorena Garcia

Email Address: lorena@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Sociology
Secondary Department: Latin American and Latino Studies
Title: Associate Professor
Office: BSB 4140C Phone: 312-413-3759
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
gender & sexuality
race/ethnicity
U.S. Latinas/os
youth

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Major: Sociology and/or LALS and/or GWS
Required Coursework: Intro to Sociology and/or LALS and/or GWS
minimum G.P.A. 3.5
Year in College: 3rd or 4th year

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will primarily assist with literature review for new project(s) [and possibly participate in some preliminary fieldwork] . Student will also be expected to meet with me to discuss tasks related to project (at least once every 2 weeks). Student may also be asked to take some UIC-based training to assist with the project (i.e., IRB, library classes related to data collection, etc).

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Lisa Gehm

Email Address: lgehm@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Emergency Medicine
Title: Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Undergraduate Education DIrector Dept of Emergency Medicine
Office: 808 S Wood Street 471 Phone: 312-413-1675
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Research Interest: Five percent of Emergency Department patients account for 20 to 28 percent of ED visits. The Emergency Patient Interdisciplinary Care (EPIC) Coordination for frequent Emergency Department (ED) visitor project aims to decrease preventable hospital admissions and improve health outcomes for frequent ED visitors. The study provides frequent ED utilizers with coordinated healthcare, assistance with unmet psychosocial challenges, and gateways to hospital and community resources, using an interdisciplinary team model of nursing, social work, pharmacy, psychiatry & community health workers.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Qualifications of a Student: Interest and enthusiasm for research and Emergency Medicine are important.Time management skills and responsibility are key attributes, as the student may work on more than one project and/or task at once. Any previous experience working with study subjects and research tasks is preferred but not required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Lisa Gehm

Email Address: lgehm@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Emergency Medicine
Title: Director, Undergraduate Medical Education
Office: 808 S. Wood St Phone: 312- 413-1675


Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes



Research Interest: Five percent of Emergency Department patients account for 20 to 28 percent of ED visits. The Emergency Patient Interdisciplinary Care (EPIC) Coordination for frequent Emergency Department (ED) visitor project aims to decrease preventable hospital admissions and improve health outcomes for frequent ED visitors. The study provides frequent ED utilizers with coordinated healthcare, assistance with unmet psychosocial challenges, and gateways to hospital and community resources, using an interdisciplinary team model of nursing, social work, pharmacy, psychiatry & community health workers.






Brief Summary of What is Expected of the Student: Student will assist with participant recruitment, participant assessment, data collection, chart reviews, and other research-related tasks. Much of the research tasks will be performed in the Emergency Department, so students must be open to flexible scheduling and willing to work outside of traditional office hours.

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Jennifer Mullins Geiger

Email Address: geigerj@uic.edu
College: Social Work
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: ETMSW 4234 Phone: 312-996-7189
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
foster care
promoting higher education among foster care alumni
supporting foster families and the children they care for
improving the foster care system

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
some knowledge of research methods
interest in conducting qualitative and qualitative research
highly motivated to learn

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will help with collecting data (qualitative and quantitative) from people, data entry, media, online sources, help with analysis (will offer training), writing reports and papers.

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Richard A. Gemeinhart

Email Address: rag@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Biopharmaceutical Sciences
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate Professor, Assistant Head, and Director of Graduate Studies
Office: 357 PHARM M/C 865 Phone: 9962253
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/bpslab/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Using polymer science to solve biomedical problems ranging from regeneration of nervous tissue to chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Basic Biology and Chemistry; Minimum Sophomore Standing; almost any major

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We expect dedication to the project and at least a full semester on the project, although longer periods are better. Each undergraduate will work directly with a graduate (PhD or MS) student learning techniques then working independently on a project. At the end of each semester, a presentation to the lab is required. More often presentaitons are suggested.

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Anne George

Email Address: anneg@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Oral Biology
Office: 437 DENT M/C 690 Phone: 9967732
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~anneg/

Research Interest:
Biomineralization; Ectopic calcification; Protein induced crystal growth

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Senior standing; Completion of coursework in biology and molecular biology

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Peter Gettins

Email Address: pgettins@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Office: E308 MSB M/C 536 Phone: 9965534
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcbtp/gettins.htm

Research Interest:
Proteinases involved in blood coagulation and their inhibitors; Structure function analysis, spectroscopy

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing; Completion of organic chemistry

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Amira Ghadeer

Email Address: amira@uic.edu
College: Other Department: Faculty Affairs HR
Office: FAHR
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Mahmood Ghassemi

Email Address: ghassemi@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Infectious Diseases
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: 808 South Wood St, Bldg CME/910, Rm. 860, Chicago, IL 60612 Phone: 312-996-2022
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Significant clinical, epidemiological, and experimental information indicates an association between human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) infection and other pathogens such as mycobacteria and hepatitis C virus (HCV), which coexist with HIV. Using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, we have developed coinfection models to investigate the mechanisms that govern these interactions. Our laboratory research also focuses on the immunopathogenesis of HIV transmission in women. This is primarily translational research on factors that may influence HIV transmission in populations at risk for HIV infection participating in various HIV prevention research trials.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
GPA: >3.0
prerequisite classes necessary: Basic Math, Chemistry, Biology
Preferred Major: Biology, Biochemistry, or other basic science majors

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student is expected to learn the basic methodologies employed in the laboratory, adhere all biohazard safety guideline, and adhere to laboratory policies and procedures.

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Aida L Giachello

Email Address: aida@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Medical Education
Title: Research Profesor
Office: 1819 W Polk Suite 246 Phone: 413-3658
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Health disparities; health outcomes; chronic conditions (asthma, diabetes); Cultural diversity; Minority women's health; Children's health; social Welfare policy issues; Hispanic/Latino health.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
I will consider someone interested in research on health promotion and disease prevention or chronic conditions.

Students must have good writing and communication skills.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
to do literature review.

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Grant Gibson

Email Address: ggibso1@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Architecture
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Office: AA Bldg, Rm3100 Phone: 7734122732
Webpage: http://www.arch.uic.edu/faculty/gibson.php
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The advancement of an architecture that challenges traditional occurrences, by heightening contextual awareness in relation to programmatic uniqueness.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should be majoring in Architecture, having completed Arch205 or higher studio course with a "B" average. Applicants should possess strong CAD (Autocad, Rhino, etc.) and physical model making skills.

Beyond these particular prerequisite design skills, students should have a strong ambition to make quality work and have excellent digital communication skills/habits.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The students will meet at least once a week with the supervising professor to review progress and set new objectives in the production of detailed architectural design drawings and models for speculative research.

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Jorge Alberto Girotti

Email Address: jorgeg@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Medical Education
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 990 CME M/C Phone: 9964493
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Qualitative research to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of educational programs in the medical school

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
Upper level student, preferably majoring in the social/behavioral sciences and ideally with some experience in behavioral research data entry and analysis experience

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will assist with review and summary of pertinent literature, data collection, entry and analysis. Experience with ATLAS.ti software a plus. Student will also assist with manuscript development.

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Maria Irene Givogri

Email Address: mgivogri@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: COMRB 7051 Phone: 312-413-1072
Webpage: http://anatomy.uic.edu/faculty/index.html?fac=mariairenegivogri&cat=all
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interests aim to identify and characterize the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the formation and maintenance of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the brain in the context of health and disease. We are particularly interested in determining the role that deregulated lipid raft-associated sphingolipid sulfatides exert on key signaling pathways of gliogenesis. Our recent study on exosomal regulation of the Platelet-derived fibroblast receptor alpha-PGFRα- (Pituch et al. JBC. 2015) prompted us to evaluate further the role of extracellular vesicles as bioactive carriers of signals in demyelinating disease and gliomas. Research on extracellular vesicles represents a novel area with significant basic and translational potential. These studies will be the foundation of our long-term goal of defining novel or improved therapeutic approaches for glial associated conditions including Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Multiple Sclerosis, and Gliomas.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15 during the academic year and 20 or more in the summer.

Qualifications of a Student:
Priority is given to Biology/Chemistry majors with GPA >3.5.
Freshman and sophomores pursuing Medical/Graduate school are encouraged to apply.Lab work is required over the academic year and during the summer. We are looking for students who aim to give a long term commitment of 2 years or more to working in our lab. No previous experience is needed, although is a plus. Our top priority in a candidate is a strong commitment to learn and work hard.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will have a probationary period of training before being formally accepted at the laboratory and involved in a specific topic of research. In this period students will gain knowledge from a senior lab member in different techniques and general duties needed to work at a laboratory. We welcome students who will remain during their junior and senior years to be fully engaged in an Honors study and pursue their Capstone Project.

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Elizabeth J Glover

Email Address: ejglover@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: SPHPI #418 Phone: 5-4548
Webpage: www.ejgloverlab.com
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Addiction
Mood disorders
Fear
Reward & aversion
Neuroscience

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should have completed their first year as an undergrad prior to applying. Students with majors in the life sciences are preferred. Prior wet lab experience is not necessary.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We require a minimum commitment of 10 hours per week though students can commit more hours if availability allows. We expect students to show up when they are scheduled, be on time and work on laboratory duties while in the lab. Students will be trained on various basic wet lab procedures including making buffers and other laboratory solutions, pipetting, processing of brain tissue, histological procedures and basic microscopy. The lab uses rodent models of addiction to explore the role that neural circuits involved in reward and aversion play in the path to dependence. Opportunities exist for students that demonstrate proficiency to work directly with the animals and collect behavioral and other data. Over time, students have the potential to learn advanced techniques including optogenetics, chemogenetics and intracranial microinfusions.

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Abigail H Goben

Email Address: agoben@uic.edu
College: University Library
Title: Associate Professor and Information Services Librarian
Office: LHS B5 Phone: 3129968292
Webpage: http://hedgehoglibrarian.com
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My current research projects include 1) research data management, particularly focusing on self-education opportunities 2) data management jobs in university libraries 3) institutional policies surrounding research data management 4) research data science in the social science 4) copyright and the health sciences

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in an aspect of research data management or academic librarianship. Junior or senior preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student may be tasked with data gathering or data entry; literature review and summaries; data verification and analysis.

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Susan Goldman

Email Address: sgoldman@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Psychology
Office: 1022C BSB M/C 285 Phone: 9964462
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~sgoldman

Research Interest:
Learning in formal (educational), informal (after school, museums, workplace), and laboratory settings, especially from multimedia materials. Learning and Assessment in content areas such as mathematics, literacy, science, and social studies. Techonology supports for learning and assessment.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Major in Psychology, Anthropology, History, any of the Sciences, or Mathematics with a grade point average of B+ or better. Preference for Juniors or Seniors but will consider Sophomores and Freshmen as well.

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Christopher Sumeet-Babu Gondi

Email Address: gondi@uic.edu
College: Medicine
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: C-217 Phone: 309-495-8167
Webpage: http://peoria.medicine.uic.edu/cms/One.aspx?portalId=513437&pageId=17503454
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Neuro-Oncology, Pancreatic-oncology

Cell signalling, transcription factors, protease biology,

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 25

Qualifications of a Student:
prerequisite classes necessary: Biology, biochemistry, molecular biology

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The lab is located i the Peoria campus and the student is expected to work i the Peoria Campus.

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Liang-Wei Gong

Email Address: lwgong@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Assistant professor
Office: SEL 4294 Phone: 312-413-0089
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/bios/faculty/gong/gong.shtml
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Synaptic transmission is mediated by fusion of synaptic vesicles with presynaptic plasma membrane to release neurotransmitter inside the vesicles. Exocytosis of synaptic vesicles is followed by endocytosis to form vesicles and local recycling of the synaptic vesicles. The mechanisms for exocytosis and endocytosis represent one of the most exciting topics in neurobiology and cell biology. Vesicle fusion is thought to be mediated by SNARE proteins, and actin, clathrin and dynamin are believed to be essential for clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

In my lab, we combine genetic and cell biological approaches with biophysical methods to investigate the mechanisms of exocytosis and endocytosis.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Raquel Gonzalez-Heredia

Email Address: rgheredi@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Surgery
Secondary Department: Surgery

Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8-20 (fkexible and negotiable)

Qualifications of a Student:

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Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Meler

Email Address: mmeler@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Secondary Department: Earth and Environmental Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 3338 SES M/C 066 Phone: 312-3553928
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/meler/index.htm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We study the impacts of environmental change and pollution on ecosystem functioning and health, and the way ecosystems can help us in mitigating or adapting to these changes in air and water quality. These ecosystems include urban areas, agricultural systems, restored prairies, temperate forests, Arctic tundra and tropical areas. In our experiments we often simulate environmental conditions of the future to anticipate responses and feedbacks in air quality and ecosystem and publich health. We are also interested in the social aspects of human-nature conflicts, particularly urban areas.

We are open to explore the applicant's own questions in this broad field of humans and the environment.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
No experience necessary for most positions. Type of work will be determined after a brief interview based on student's interests, time commitment and lab capabilities.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We expect the student to develop critical thinking on issues of environmental health. We also desire the student to understand how basic and applied science work and how the interrelte with one another. We offer flexible hours and we emphasize career development, so we expect to have conversations on how to better strategize the applicant's future.

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Victor Roland Gordeuk

Email Address: vgordeuk@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Division of Hematology/Oncology; Department of Medicine
Title: Professor of Medicine
Office: Sickle Cell Center Phone: 312-996-5680
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Sickle Cell Disease
Iron metabolism- iron overload and iron deficiency
Congenital Polycythemia
Hypoxic response
Metabolic consequences of hematologic disorders
Cardiopulmonary and renal consequences of hematologic disorders

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
MInimum GPA 3.5
Preferred majors of biology, chemistry or physics
Pass and aptitude test for basic skills administered in our laboratory

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You will join an active laboratory and are expected to learn new techniques, experimental skills, and hypothesis development. You will be expected to participate in various aspects of the laboratory and assist other laboratory researchers in conducting experiments, analyze data and present your work along with literature review. You are expected to gain experience in mammalian tissue culture experiments, basic molecular biology techniques such as western blots, transfection, and ELISA. This research will assist in thinking critically of research papers, and prepare for graduate or medical school and foster the basic science fundamentals in you.

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Stephanie M Gorka

Email Address: sgorka2@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1747 W. Roosevelt Road - Room 240 Phone: 312-413-4707
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We aim to better understand how the brain impacts mood and behavior; especially anxiety and alcohol abuse. Our work uses a variety of tools including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), psychophysiology, self-report questionnaires, and behavioral tasks. Many of our measures are focused on response to uncertain stressors and rewards. We believe that individuals who are extremely sensitive to uncertainty may be at risk for a variety of mental health problems. We currently have two, large-scale funded projects and many opportunities to get involved!

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
- *Must be detail-oriented, hard-working, professional, reliable with good social skills. You will helping run our lab; therefore, your commitment and reliability are extremely important.
- Preference will be given to students who have an interest in neuroscience based research and can commit to the lab for 1 year or more.
- Prefer sophomores or above.
-Minimum GPA of 3.0.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You will help administer and perform research-related tasks. These tasks may include assisting in subject recruitment, screening potential participants on the phone, scheduling participants, collecting psychophysiological data from participants, and processing data/data entry. Opportunities may exist for the preparation of posters or research papers, depending on the student's interest, capability and willingness.

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Geraldine Gorman

Email Address: ggorman@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Health Systems Science
Office: 1010 NURS M/C 802 Phone: 4139013

Research Interest:
Prison reform: spiritual support through writing and meditation, hospice care; Public Health, War and Peace; Physical and Psychological Support of Veterans; Narrative Writing and Identity

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Compassionate and inquisitive; Computer literate

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Robert Gould

Email Address: rmgould@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Office: 561 CME M/C 512 Phone: 4139685

Research Interest:
Evolution of myelin
Identification of proteins in different genomes using bioinformatics approaches

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Courses in Biochemistry/molecular Biology/Cell Biology/Bioinformatics

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Mark Dean Grabiner

Email Address: grabiner@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Kinesiology and Nutrition
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: 690 CME M/C 994 Phone: 9962757
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Aging, Gait, Mobility, Prosthetics, Falls, Intervention

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
Calculus and Physics is a benefit, familiarity with, or friendly attitude toward, computers, ability to work as an independent, yet interactive member of a team

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will become competent with and qualified to use the laboratory instrumentation, become familiar with the literature on which the laboratory's current research is based, execute a hypothesis-driven investigation and present the results at the UIC Research Symposium in the spring .

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Michael Grassi

Email Address: grassim@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
Title: Research Associate Professor
Office: 1905 W Taylor St Phone: 312-413-7347
Webpage: http://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/cms/One.aspx?portalId=506244&pageId=15403232
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
The Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences is hiring a qualified undergraduate student to assist a highly successful investigator in the fields of biological research. The Retina Chemical Genomics Laboratory focuses on translational research with the goal of making significant contributions to the development of novel molecularly targeted treatments for retinal disease. The aim of their research program is to use chemical genomics in a multi-faceted and interdisciplinary, systems-oriented approach to understand the molecular basis of common blinding retinal conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
A qualified individual will have some previous hands-on experience in biological research with basic knowledge in cell biology, molecular biology, and sanitary techniques.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The individual will be involved in a number of different projects at the bench level; mixing reagents and performing cell culture and PCR. Self-motivation, meticulousness, clear thinking, and the ability to take research notes and keep records are the most appreciated qualities.

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Mark Grechanik

Email Address: drmark@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: SEO 1103 Phone: 312-355-3520
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/~drmark/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research area is software engineering in general, with particular interests in software testing, evolution, and reuse. I am also interested in problems that lie at the intersection of software engineering and data privacy.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Basic understanding of the software development steps: compilation, linking, debugging, etc. Students are expected to have good understanding of CS Data Structures. Familiarity with object-oriented programming, specifically C++ and/or Java is a definite plus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be engaged in research projects where they will work next to graduate students on different components of these projects.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Binta Green

Email Address: balleyne@uic.edu
College: Social Work Department: Jane Addams Social Work
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: EPASW 4206 Phone: 3129962433
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Currently, my research interest focuses on factors that may influence young women particularly African American women risk for contracting HIV. I have found that my research focuses on factors such as dating violence, substance use, condom use, and power dynamics within intimate relationships. To date I've published a number of articles that explore these factors in the lives of young adult and adolescent African American women.

In addition, I am also interested in factors that may influence the continued risk behaviors of African American women who have a HIV diagnosis. Research has shown that many people who are HIV positive continue to engage in risk behaviors similar to that of their HIV negative counterparts. My interest lies in exploring factors that may influence the continued risk behaviors of HIV positive African American women such as poverty, power dynamics in the intimate relationships, support, violence, and stigma.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
I am pretty open to working with students from any discipline. However, I feel very strongly about students commitment to research, especially research in the field of HIV and women, particularly African American women.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students should expect to work on literature reviews, and assisting in writing manuscripts for submission to different journal articles. Anything that a student writes that's used in the final manuscript, the student will receive credit for his/her work by having their name listed as one of the contributing authors. In addition to assisting with manuscript submissions, students will also assist in the writing of grant proposals. Furthermore, students can also expect to possibly work on powerpoints for presentation at National conferences and or co-present at a these conferences.

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Paul Grippo

Email Address: pgrippo@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology; Department of Medicine
Title: Associate Proffesor
Office: CSB #708 Phone: 312-355-4133
Webpage: http://fsmweb.northwestern.edu/faculty/FacultyProfile.cfm?xid=17299
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Biotechnology; Cancer Biology; Cancer Genetics; Cancer: Pancreas; Immune System; Molecular Biology; Oncology; Transgenics -transgenic mice models, detection, chemoprevention, diet, immunology, therapy

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Any student interested in perusing a degree in a biology-related field.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be expected to work ~10 hrs a week. An early emphasis will be on genomic DNA isolation from mouse tissue and subsequent PCR(Polymerase Chain Reaction) to aid in the maintenance of the transgenic mouse colony. A chance for further study may include protein isolation, RNA isolation and tissue culture maintenance.
As an undergrad some common lab duties would be required such as buffer and reagent creation as well as cleaning and lab upkeep. Overall an excellent chance to work in, and observe how a modern molecular biology lab operates at the university level.

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Heather E. Grossman

Email Address: hgrossma@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Architecture
Secondary Department: Art History
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: HH211B Phone: 312 355 0616
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Fall, 2012: Architectural Drawings (digital) for Monograph on Medieval Architecture.

Research Interests: Architecture, Historic Preservation, Design, Architectural History, Medieval/Historical Architecture, Medieval History; cultural exchange and interaction.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6 (negotiable as needed to fulfill project)

Qualifications of a Student:
Third or fourth year architecture student; excellent facility with AutoCAD and other software (demonstrated by recommendation from a School of Architecture faculty member & portfolio review); ability to read previously published architectural plans (of historic buildings); attention to detail, dependability and self-direction. Interest in historical architecture a plus (possibly having taken one of the following: AH221/242/243/244/441).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I am completing a book on thirteenth-century architectural monuments in Greece and France, and would like to find an advanced undergraduate architecture student who can redraw (in CAD) and help standardize previously published architectural plans, sections and elevations of medieval buildings. These will be for publication in a book due to a publisher in late 2012; c 15-20 plans will be needed. Preference for the student-architect to be able to advise me on possibilities/problem solving in digital representation for new plans as well (visualizing certain archaeological elements not yet planned/graphically represented, such as placing sculptural fragments into drawn plans, hypothetical reconstructions of now-lost structural elements such as roof-lines, etc).

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Daniel Peter Groves

Email Address: dgroves@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
Title: Professor
Office: SEO 727
Webpage: http://www.math.uic.edu/~groves/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Geometry, topology, group theory and interactions between these subjects.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Olivia Gude

Email Address: gude@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: School of Art and Design
Office: 813 UH M/C 036
Webpage: http://spiral.aa.uic.edu

Research Interest:
Public Art
Collaborative Art
Community-based Art
Mosaics
Murals

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
In Spring Semester, a research assistant could work with me on a National Endowment for the Arts founded intergenerational mosaic project at nearby Hilliard Apartments (State and 22nd)

Assist and participate in design meetings, site exploration/documentation, community interviews, enlarging scale drawings, learn mosaic work--glass tile, prepare community mosaic technique lessons, etc.

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Anna Guevarra

Email Address: guevarra@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Asian American Studies
Secondary Department: Gender and Women\'s Studies
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1030 UH Phone: 312-413-0004
Webpage: http://asam.uic.edu/asam/faculty-and-staff/anna-guevarra
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Immigrant and transnational labor; community and civic engagement; Asian American Studies; Filipino American Studies; gender and labor; activism

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
experience in doing basic social science and/or humanities library research and knowledge of various library databases; someone who is organized, reliable, and able to work independently.

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Alessandro Guidotti

Email Address: aguidott@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Office: 256A PI M/C 912 Phone: 4134594
Webpage: http://www.psych.uic.edu/faculty/guidotti.htm

Research Interest:
Molecular mechanisms of cognitive functions

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of coursework in biology, biochemistry, and physiology

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Marina Guizzetti

Email Address: marinag@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Associate Professor
Office: JBVA room 7271 Phone: 312-569-8684
Webpage: http://www.psych.uic.edu/154-about-us/directory/faculty/220-marina-guizzetti
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
The main research interest in my laboratory is the identification of novel mechanisms of glia-neuron interactions involved in brain development and neuronal plasticity. In particular, we are investigating mechanisms of neuronal development driven by astrocytes altered by ethanol and implicated in learning and behavioral abnormalities associated with in utero alcohol exposure, as seen in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD), as well as in cognitive impairments observed in individuals who abuse alcohol.
Astrocytes are able to modulate many neuronal functions, including neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, by secreting neuroactive proteins and peptides and by regulating the composition of the extracellular matrix, creating microenvironments that can be permissive or inhibitory of neuronal differentiation. Alcohol strongly alters the equilibrium of permissive and inhibitory cues released by astrocytes therefore dramatically affecting neuronal development.
Furthermore, we are interested in characterizing the epigenetic mechanisms
involved in the effects of ethanol on astrocytes leading to alteration in astrocyte secreted proteins.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10-12

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA of 3.0 and major in biological or biomedical sciences preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
After short training, students will be expected to carry out in vivo and in vitro experiments such as preparation and care of primary astrocyte cultures, Western blot, immunocytochemistry, biochemical assays...

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Madhu Gupta

Email Address: guptam@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Physiology and Biophysics
Title: Research Associate Professor
Office: Room 2051, COMRB Phone: 312-355 4937
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My lab is interested in identifying molecular mechanisms of heart failure. In particular we are looking at the transcription regulatory mechanisms and microRNAs involvement in heart failure induced by diabetes and by high blood pressure. We are also interested in the micrRNAs involvement in cardiac remodeling that occurs following birth.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
GPA: 3.0(minimum). Basic understanding of DNA, RNA, gene transcription. Prior experience of some lab work like gel electrophoresis is a plus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Should be careful and have time management skills. Should know accurate pipeting.

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Alexander Gutfraind

Email Address: agutfrai@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: SPH (1603 W Taylor) Rm. 834
Webpage: http://www.gutfraind.com/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Advanced computing algorithms promise to solve many problems in medicine and public health. In my work, I use such algorithms to forecast the spread of infectious diseases, develop new vaccines and therapies, and prepare for diseases like West Nile Virus.

An important challenge is to construct simulations from data. The simulations describe the behavior of people in the cities, particularly people who are at a high-risk for disease, like the homeless and drug users. The data includes the profiles of thousands of people or many years of tracking. From this data, I construct massive simulations of cities like Chicago, which are similar to the movie The Matrix.

Social networks are critically important in these problems. I study how social networks influence diseases, and how the networks themselves form and change.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
* Interest in cutting-edge academic research, and continuing into graduate school or industrial research.
* Desirable: Experience with data analysis using tools like Excel, Access, R, Python and others
* Highly valuable: experience with computer programming in any programming language

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You will have opportunities to contribute your skills and ideas to a number of cutting edge research projects. Depending on your skills, you might be involved in analyzing data, constructing and testing hypotheses. You will be expected to master valuable transferable skills such as data analysis algorithms, geographic information systems, and statistical analysis. You will be involved in writing academic publications. Compensation is available.

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Elena Rebeca Gutierrez

Email Address: elgut@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Gender and Women's Studies
Secondary Department: Latin American and Latino Studies
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1224 Phone: 6-9039
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/wsweb/people/faculty/gutierrez/gutierrez.html
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
oral history, qualitative interviews, Mexicans in Chicago, Reproductive politics, sterilization abuse, Chicana activism, feminist activism and organizing, health disparities

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Qualifications of a Student:

minimum G.P.A. 3.0

solid writing skills

familiarity with social science and humanities databases

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
PROJECT A: Mexican American History in Chicago:

In this project which is based in historical methods of oral history, document analysis and digital archiving, students will: help collect, annotate and organize bibliographic literature and primary documents, assist with oral history collection and transcription, timeline creation and website management. Some may also assist in processing documents, photos and other historical ephemera related to organizing and activism in Chicago (scanning, identifying and archiving).

This project would be exciting to anyone wanting to learn the basic skills of comprehensive document collection, oral history interviewing, digital humanities.


Project B: Reproductive Justice Virtual Library
Students will work on a digital archive of research related to reproductive health and politics: https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/center-on-reproductive-rights-and-justice/crrj-reproductive-justice-virtual-library/

Students will locate, read and annotate relevant academic research, organizational reports and primary documents and contribute to a national database that connects academic research with social movements that are able to utilize this information for their efforts.

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Sharon Haar

Email Address: haar@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: School of Architecture
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 3100 AA M/C Phone: 3129963335
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Social Entrepreneurial Networks in Architecture:
My current research traces the transformation of alternative design practice in architecture, from its beginnings the 1960s as a form of service and activism to more recent social entrepreneurial activities. I am exploring the shift toward new models of social engagement made possible by global social and cultural movements that are linked through new networking technologies with a particular emphasis on how these changes are building upon, replacing, or transforming the work of more traditional community-based practices.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6, negotiable

Qualifications of a Student:
Third or Fourth Year Student;
Strong Research and Graphic Skills;
Ability to read architectural drawings;
Preference to Architecture, Graphic Design, Art History, Planning, and Communications students in that order.

Looking for student for 2012-2013.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
To be arranged based on student interest and ability. Weekly workload to be balanced with the student's other coursework, particularly around midterm and finals. The student will assist in the development of diagrams, maps, and charts for upcoming lectures and publications.The student will assist in library, archive, and internet research.

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Yoram Haftel

Email Address: yhaftel@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Political Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1108 C BSB Phone: 312 996 8778
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~yhaftel
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
My research explores topics related to international political economy. I am most interested in the role international institutions – such as regional economic organizations and investment treaties – play in the promotion of international cooperation, especially in the developing world. I am currently working on two projects in these areas. In one project, I examine the link between international trade and the design of regional economic organizations. In another project, I study the politics surrounding the ratification of bilateral investment treaties.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should have a gpa of 3.5 or higher; POLS 283 under their belt with a B grade or higher; political science majors are preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
In the first project, students are expected to collect and analyze information on the activities and institutions of regional economic organizations in Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

In the second project, students are expected to collect data on investment treaty ratification dates around the world and analyze the text of these treaties.

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Ashley Hall

Email Address: amhall7@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Biopharmaceutical Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 456A PHARM Phone: 312-996-2560
Webpage: https://pharmacy.uic.edu/departments/biopharmaceutical-sciences/people/faculty
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Forensic Science
DNA Profiling
Touch DNA
Genetics of Eye Color
Massively Parallel Sequencing
Y-Chromosome Markers
DNA Profile Databases

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Major: any of the life sciences

Year: junior, senior (sophomore with lab experience considered)

Minimum GPA: 3.0

Prerequisite classes: general biology, laboratory-based courses in biology

Preferred experience: familiarity with general biological lab skills, use of micropipets, reagent preparation, ability to follow protocols and document results

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
In my lab, I require undergraduate students to spend at least 10 hours a week in the lab. I assign the student to work directly with a graduate student on the selected research project. (S)he will be fully trained in laboratory protocol, then asked to work independently to advance the research project.

Successful students will be included as authors on peer-reviewed journal articles, and on presentations given at national and/or local meetings (posters or talks).

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Matthew Hall

Email Address: mshall@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Sociology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 4176B BSB Phone: 312-966-4647
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Immigrant residential and economic incorporation/assimilation, particularly in "new" destination areas (non-traditional gateways, rural communities, suburbs); Effects of legal status for immigrants; Immigration and the labor market; Residential segregation, diversity, and racial change; Urban homelessness;

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Taken at least one course in statistics and have in interest in scientifically-minded social research. Students from Sociology will be given preference, but those from related other social science departments will be considered.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Expectations would be decided upon individually, but generally speaking, I would anticipate student RAs to help prepare materials for presentation and publication (e.g., the creation of tables, graphs, powerpoints), to help with the assembly of secondary data sets, and to engage with and summarize recent work related to research projects.

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Sara Frances Hall

Email Address: sahall@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Germanic Studies
Secondary Department: Literatures, Cultural Studies and Linguistics
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1506 UH M/C 189 Phone: 4132372
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
European Cinema
International silent film
Contemporary German cinema
International and transnational film markets
Women film pioneers
Law and culture
Germany in the 1920s

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum 2.7 GPA
Completed English 161 or higher
Passionate about cultural history and or media and film culture
Reading knowledge of German preferred, but not required

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will spend a portion of the week's hours reading and compiling an annotated reading list on a topic of their choosing, in the realm of modern German culture. Another portion of the hours will be spent helping to gather and digest sources, proof-read drafts, and digitize materials related to my specific project on the role of film in the transition from imperialism to democracy in Germany around 1918. If the students are employed for the full academic year, they will also write up and present the results of their own independent research project in spring and attend related presentations on campus or in Chicago with me throughout the year.

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Clive Halliwell

Email Address: halliwel@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Physics
Office: 2270 SES M/C 273 Phone: 4132782
Webpage: http://physicsweb.phy.uic.edu/people/faculty/display.asp?Name=Halliwell

Research Interest:
High-Energy Physics

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Knowledge of Javascript, ASP, Web, and HTML

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Arden S. Handler

Email Address: handler@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Community Health Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 655 SPHPI M/C 923 Phone: 9965954
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Well-woman's health care across the reproductive life course including preconception/interconception care, prenatal care, delivery care, and postpartum care. Impact of social determinants of health on reproductive and perinatal outcomes. The role of the public health delivery system in the delivery of maternal and child health services.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Good conceptual ability; Good library skills and writing skills; Knowledge of statistical programming packages, especially SAS and/or knowledge of qualitative programming packages.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Potential involvement in literature reviews, data collection, qualitative and quantitative analyses, preparation of manuscripts.

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Riaz Ul Haque

Email Address: rhaque@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Microbiology and Immunology
Title: Associate Professor (emeritus)
Office: M/C 790 Phone: 312-243-7716
Webpage: http://www.centerforintegrativelearning.org; www.ifoundmicrobiology.com; http://www.iibbt.com
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
INTRDUCTION::
It is not easy to learn these days what with fragmented educational system where knowledge is broken down into subjects and delivered via lectures over quarters and semesters and now via e-learning thus loosing cohesiveness of ideas and thoughts. Aspiring students however can expedite learning by participating in special workshops and internships where all knowledge is integrated not fragmented where there are no subjects but a continuous flow of interconnected concepts, skills and ideas. This is what the Centers I established are endeavoring to accomplish.

My experience so far is that this process not only expedites learning but also shows that learning disabilities and the learning difficulties experienced by the so called slow learners vanish. You will be able to see more of this as you read on further where various projects the centers have undertaken or are currently undertaking are described.

My mentoring philosophy
Mentoring with the student in mind

Even though I am a Microbiologist by training, my interests are much broader than that. I would actually describe myself as a social scientist interested in all areas which affect our lives. In this context I am especially interested in the changing state of education and how it affects the students the world over.

Consequently my mission and that of the above named centers I established is to conserve and perpetuate our accumulated knowledge to the current and the future generations of human kind. This is important because the educational panorama has now so drastically changed especially with course cutting, eliminating hands-on labs including watering down courses and now e-learning, that most students find themselves lost in the emerging quagmire that the educational system has become thus adding to their fears and uncertainties about themselves and their abilities.

These fears and uncertainties are eloquently expressed in the following ode as if written by a student to share his or her uncertainties. See how well you identify with the feelings expressed there and then consider interning with us, hopefully to rise above those fears.

TO PARENTS, TEACHERS AND EDUCATORS
LISTEN TO THE CHILD BEFORE YOU TEACH
IF I WERE A CHILD AND YOU WERE LISTENING
HERE IS WHAT I WOULD LIKE YOU TO KNOW

AS I WISH AND WONDER IN MY OWN SILENT WAY
What is to become of me!

From the day I was born
Perhaps even before
In utter silence
Known only to me
As I wished and wondered
What is to become of me?
And what I am here for?

Would someone tell me the story?
Of where we come from
Or where we are going
And what is my purpose, if any?
In them thar scheme of things?

Am I here to do merriment
like the grasshopper
or live in fear like the squirrel
letting voluptuous summers slip by
hoarding acorns
so not to fall short
during the winter cold?


No, no, it just can’t be so
I am here to feel the vicissitudes
of my yearning Soul
urging me to fulfill its goal

I am not a mere fallen leaf
blowing in the wind
I am part of the whole
being needed in earnest
to add to its growth.

But how would I ever know
unless someone connects me
to our yesterdays
so I too KNOW
where we had been
and what lies ahead
in the yet unknown.

If this ode hits the spot then you know I am on the right track. Conseuently if you would like to mentor with us, send me an e-mail at: haqueriazaol.com.

As educators, we need to concentrate on understanding that inner longing and thereby work towards resolving that silent suffering of each and every child the world over. That needs to be our one and only mission. And for that we need to start by listening to the child and remembering that all children come equipped with the survival skills but not the knowledge of how our world works and what skills he or she would need to acquire to become part of, and evolve with our, evolving world.

Only we can fill that gap by exposing the child to our evolving world in its totality with no gaps whatsoever. Our guidepost has to be: Just because we know something does not mean that the child knows it too who, in fact, is counting on us to learn from. We can stretch it by breaking the information in bits and pieces or we can shorten the learning time by sifting, sorting, condensing and integrating what we know and then presenting it as an overview to the child, much like a continuous story with no gaps whatsoever but still a “work in progress” so they too can join in and help towards the completion of the work!

SUCH A MISSION CAN ONLY BE ACHIEVED BY TEACHING AND LEARNING BY TOTAL IMMERSION INTO THE WORLD WE LIVE IN AND NOT VIA FRAGMENTATION OF OUR WORLD AND THEN TEACHING ABOUT IT IN BITS AND PIECES.

It is to provide that kind of immersion that the centers mentioned above attempt to integrate knowledge of science, art, humanities, music, economics, business, philosophy, psychology and technology in one place and teach as far as possible, specially the science, by the hands-on method using all the basic science instruments scientists use to do science.

Here is some additional reading material for you to get acquainted with the pitfalls of our conventional and now overly fragmented educational system which has progressively become more of a business, specially with the introduction of e-learning, than the means of imparting knowledge and skills. Also, because of political reasons, the educational system is being geared more and more towards job preparedness than providing a boarder, knowledge based education.

History of our changing educational system: The change in our educational system started way back in the fifties and sixties of the past century for two reasons; one, when Sputnik, the Russian satellite went up leaving America wondering about the quality of its educational system and two, due to President Lyndon Johnson’s great society movement which emphasized jobs, no matter how menial such jobs were, as opposed to broad based education which would have been time consuming in the beginning but long lasting and prestigious at the end.

Sputnik provided just the opening for the businesses and even for the not for profit organizations to step in to introduce newer curriculum and provide and sell lesson plans and science kits to schools taking the task of curriculum design and its implementation away from teachers, administrators and the educators. This outside and business based system is now so well entrenched into our educational system and we have come to rely on it so much that it practically drains all the funds allocated for education.

Not only that, the system also keeps wanting that more and more money be put into the educational system, all in the name of improving the quality of education. The businesses do not even hesitate to lobby the parents and the legislators for more money which they generally get because after all it is for the betterment of the current and upcoming generations of our citizens! You can read more about this encroachment here: What ails our educational system? http://www.iibbt.com/whatails.htm

As opposed to the now prevailing fragmented system of education mentioned above, integration and immersion method of teaching has one main advantage; it condenses and shrinks knowledge reducing science, for instance, to mere 150 concepts and skills which are easy to learn, retain and use; see the story how serendipitously science got reduced to 150 concepts and skills here: http://www.iibbt.com/storyhowscience.htm.

We also need to assess to what extent handicaps and learning disabilities are real? By relegating such persons into a special class requiring special attention and thus additional funding, we have not only unnecessarily increased our education expenditure but also branded many an innocent and capable persons who have alternate abilities within which they function rather well yet they are being held back because of this special system created for them.

In this context, see the inspirational story of Judy, a hearing and speech compromised individual who, after completing her high school, was being trained to be a janitor which she fought against. See to what heights she reached by interning at the Center and learning via the practical, integrated and immersion form of teaching and learning. You can read her story here: http://www.iibbt.com/Judy.html.


WHAT WE EXPECT FROM OUR INTERNS?

TIME INPUT REQUIRED FROM INTERNS:

Minimum time commitment is 20 hours per week but negotiable.

PREQUIRISTES FOR INTERNS:
No prerequisites. Just willingness to learn and apply diligently.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT IS EXPECTED FROM OUR INTERNS:

Learn what we are doing and why. Become part pf our immersion form of teaching and learning, yet do your own thing i.e., pursue your assigned or agreed upon project. Also know what others are doing and learn from them and also teach them. That has the way of not only shortening the journey for everyone but also getting exposed to other unknown horizons in the process. Just do not isolate yourself even though you may be an island but the water that surrounds your island will keep encroaching on your terrain. Enjoy and benefit from it. You will be surprised how non-academic activities have much learning in them. I am told that Jaque Monod, the Nobel Laureat, used to come to his lab, open a window and sit and play his trumpet and if no idea precipitaed, he wil go home only to repeat the process the next day. Was that a waste of his time or it is this activity which landed him the Nobel prize!

In the same vein, here is a useful mantra, a sort of a litmus test as it will help you take pause before acting or deciding. WHAT COULD OR WOULD HAPPEN IF... IF EVERY ONE ASKED THAT QUESTION BEFORE PLANNING BUT FOR SURE BEFORE ACTING OR IMPLEMENTING, THE WORLD WOULD BE A BETTER PLACE AS ALL OF US COLLECTIVELY WILL MAKE LESS MISTAKES AND WILL ALSO KEEP OUR EGOS UNDER CHECK.

HOW TO DO RESEARCH?

Research begins with a question about what you do not know or understand and also with what other people are talking about that particular issue. Reseasrch projects are thus not hard to design either on your own or in consultation with your mentor. Having said that even a simple question like are bathroom tissues reallysanitary and/or strong can become a research project specially when those marketed are to meet certain set standards. The question then becomes: do they really meet the set guidelines? You may be surpried what you will find when put the tissues to the test!

All interns at the center thus end up having a research project to work on either designed by the interns themselves or assigned to them by their mentor. The resulting research experience thus enables the students to pull all aspects of that problem together, often via a literature search, which augments learning and knowing. The interns also design the research protocol and design the necessary experiments to obtain the needed answers.

In the case of a lab based research project, the interns also prepare all the needed supplies, tests and standardizes the needed instruments and gathers and interprets the data. Eventually the intern writes a report following the protocol required for a paper to be submitted for publication.

In the non- laboratory based research projects the interns undertake a survey, gather the prevailing information and data and detrmines where correction or improvement may be needed. Then proposes the change and projects the expected improvements if and when the proposals are inmplemented.

LIST OF OUR CURRENT AND ON GOING PROJECTS
These are the projects that the interns can select from plus they can add their own project to work on

1. DELINIATING MECHANISMS OF MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS:

2. IMPROVING SCIENCE EDUCATION VIA HANDS-ON TEACHING, NOT MERE BOOK LEARNING. THIS REQUIRES USING THE SCIENCE INSTRUMENTS SCIENTISTS USE TO DO SCIENCE. THIS APPROACH TAKES THE FEAR OUT OF LEARNING SCIENCE THEREBY ENCOURAGING MORE STUDENTS TO OPT FOR SCIENCE BASED JOBS AND CAREERS:

3. RESTORING, REFURBISHING AND MAINTAINING LAB INSTRUMENTS SUCH AS MICROSCOPES, pH METERS, SPECTROPHOTOMETERS, CODUCTIVITY METERS, ELECTRPHORESIS AND CHROMATOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT AND MORE…

4. TRAINING WAR VETERANS FOR JOBS AND CAREERS:

5. DESIGNING CURRICULUM BY INTEGRATING ALL KNOWLEDGE INSTEAD OF FRAGMENTING AND COMPARTMENTALIZING IT:

6. TECHNOTHERAPY™. A NEW FORM OF THERAPY EMERGING AS AN OFF SHOOT OF INTEGATIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING:

7. PROVIDING PRACTICAL AND FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE AT THE GRASSROOT LEVEL WITH THE AIM OF IMPROVING HEALTH AND HYGIENE INCLUDING MOTIVATING PEOPLE TOWARDS SCIENCE EDUCATION BY SIMPLIFYING SCIENCE EDUCATION. THIS PROJECT APPLICABLE TO ALL PEOPLE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.

8. ASSESSING THE MANNER OF SCIENCE TEACHING IN SCHOOLS, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES AND THEN DESIGNING MEANS TO REVIVE AND PROMOTE HANDS-ON SCIENCE TEACHING IN SCHOOLS, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITEIS:

9. DESIGN CURRICULUM FOR TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOMENT OF INSTRUCTORS AND TEACHERS:

10. GREEN MICROBIOLOGY - DEVELOPING A HANDS-ON COURSE CALLED GREEN MICROBIOLOGY BASICALLY TO REMOVE FEAR ABOUT WORKING WITH MICROBES.

11. GLOBAL OUTREACH - OUR TANZANIA PROJECT, PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF AIDS AND MALARIA VIA HANDS-ON SCIENCE EDUCATION FOCUSSING ON HYYGIENE.

12. DROP OUT PREVENTION VIA PROVIDING HEAD START FOR JOBS AND CAREERS IN THE MEDICAL AND PARA-MEDICAL PROFESSIONS, FOODS, PHARMACEUTIAL, COSMETIC AND FERMENTATION INDUSTRIES INCLUDING AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES.

13. GRANT WRITING, SEEKING FUNDING:

14. ECOLOGY OF EDUCATION:


FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT OUR CURRENT AND ON-GOING PROJECTS:

NOTE: In our Center you will note a heavy emphasis on Microbiology and Immunology and related lab skills not because I am a Microbiologist but because Microbiology is regardd as the mother science which influenced and helped advance many other sciences such as physiology, histology, molecular biology, genetic engineering, and biotechnology among others.

Being small organisms, with a generation time of 20 minutes on the average, and with the ability to pick up useful stray genetic elements from the enviroment, they have also contributed to our understading of population dynamics, species delineation, antibiosis, probiosis, while maintaining genetic stability yet staying open to change via acquiring and expressing alien genetic material. Microbiology thus presents endless applications and that is why we regard it as the essential knowledge base of all science savvy and educated individuals.

1. DELINIATING MECHANISMS OF MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS:

This project is ideal for those who want to do extensive biochemical and biomedical reearch.

The project involves determining the role of cellular, intracellular and extacellular products (enzymes and toxins) in microbial patogenesis dealing with bacteria, fungi, atinomycetes, chlamedia, rickettsiae and viruses. It will also involve undersanding the host-parasite relationship including native and artificially indused immunity.

2. IMPROVING SCIENCE EDUCATION VIA HANDS-ON TEACHING, NOT MERE BOOK LEARNING, USING THE SCIENCE INSTRUMENTS SCIENTISTS USE TO DO SCIENCE. THIS APPROACH TAKES THE FEAR OUT OF LEARNING SCIENCE THEREBY ENCOURAGING MORE STUDENTS TO OPT FOR SCIENCE BASED JOBS AND CAREERS:


We do this by making Science sensible and thereby learn-able by designing and implementing hands-on concepts and skills based science using all the basic science instruments scientists use to do science. This integrated curriculum which consists of only 150 concepts and skills was arrived at via a survey conducted with input from a variety of acadmic, industrial, sanitary, clinical and governmental employers, see details here: http://www.iibbt.com/storyhowscience.htm

As an intern at the Center getting to know this integrated view of science is likely to spark new interest in science leading to science based jobs and careers. It will be especially useful for those interested in teaching as it is likely to make them better all around teachers, specially science teachers, which are now in short supply.

3. RESTORING, REFURBISHING AND MAINTAINING LAB INSTRUMENTS SUCH AS MICROSCOPES, pH METERS, SPECTROPHOTOMETERS, CODUCTIVITY METERS, ELECTRPHORESIS AND CHROMATOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT AND MORE…

This is a vanishing art as much of this maintenance work is now done by companies selling the instruments who set up a contractual arrangement with the users such as the schools, universities nd colleges and provide them the needce repair and mainenance services on a scheduled basis. This is fine but its sad part is that neither the teachers nor the students get to know how to fix, repair or maintain the equipment they are using and if the instrument is not working as it sahould, they do not know the difference. Yet they keep on using the instrument even though the results they are getting are erroneous.

This skill should actually be taught to the teachers and the students and we at the Science Skills center provide that opportunity to our inerns. Actually we are also inviting our interns to become part of a larger project that we are undertaking wherein we will restore and refurbish used and discarded insruments and make them available to inner city schools which hardly have any science instruments to speak of. This way we will be bringing real hands-on sciecne teaching to under served schools.


4. TRAINING WAR VETERANS FOR JOBS AND CAREERS:

There are three approaches to this; one, is the project called Troops to Teachers that the Governor’s office is promoting. The intern involved with this project will gather information about this project and then design a protocal how to make this tranition happen and also apply for funding.

The second is to train war veterans in the art and science of restoring and refurbishing science instruments (see number 3 above) and then making the refurbished instruments available to schools specially to schools located in the poor neighborhoods where science labs hardly have any equipment to speak of. The war veteran so trained will also serve as liasons guiding the respective science teachers in using the instruments to teach the relevant science concepts and skills. Such trained war vetersn would also be able to get a job in the school syserm as science lab asistant assiting the science teacher in implementing the hands-on approach to science teaching.

And the third is to give the veterans a head start to seek entery into medical and para medical professions, or jobs in the numerous science based industries such as foods, pharmaceutical and cosmetic including agriculture and environmental issues.

5. DESIGNING CURRICULUM BY INTEGRATING ALL KNOWLEDGE INSTEAD OF FRAGMENTING AND COMPARTMENTALIZING IT:

The need to do this is so acute that it is for this reason students take notes and highlight sentences and paragraphs in books!Yet educators do not see the need to provide that kind of integration.

Integration is also important because we humans are hard wired to learn whole stories better that make sense. We learn even faster, with more retention and understanding, if the stories are first presented to us in an overview form which we can then decipher and after mulling them over in our minds, can make them part of our own evolving knowledge base. All students long to get this kind of knowledge. I know I did when I was growing up but fortunately knowledge in that format was available then but has progresively become extinct now as courses have been eliminated or watered down and/or lab portion of many courses elimianed.

This is a far cry from what used to be the norm during the sixties and the seventies of the past century when lab courses consised of lab books comprising of upwards of 350 pages where students did all excercises on their own thus learning first hand and acquiring skills and procedures including learning their limitations in the process; very important for those professionals such as the physicians and other health care workers including the research scientists who would be needing to make on the spot decisions to deliver their services or prform their rasks.

The prevailing tendency of cutting down or watering down courses thus has to be corrected and for that very reason I have established the Center for Integrative Learning and the Science Skills Center, see http://www.centerforintegrativelearning.org; http://www.scienceskillscenter.org.
.
It turns out, even to my own surprise, that as we integrate knowledge removing minutia, duplications and redundancies from it, it shrinks. This happens not only to science, as mentioned earlier, but also to our knowledge of art, music, philosophy, sociology, economics and psychology etc. They also shrink and when we combine their essence with that of science, we end up with a holistic collage of practically the whole of our functional knowledge knowing which makes us versatile, analytical and thereby much more useful to ourselves and to our society.

Looking at this in a broader, global sense what I see is a possible hope for the disillusioned masses around the world who may or may not be suffring from hunger, which they do, but their greatest hunger is for knowledge which is not being made available to them in a digestable (integrative) form. Yet they go to schools hoping that schools will provide it but in the end all they see is disappointment and frustration which they try to blame on those outside influences which promised but failed to deliver on their promises. All trust is thus lost and no peace can come out of this sort of psychological climate wherein all they do is point fingers and all we do is defend and justify ourselves. Won't it be better if we shared the knowledge in the first place? The integrated way of teaching and learning can do that in a hurry thereby bringing individuals and nations together; the first step towards negotiating global peace.

This could be an ideal proejct for those styding politial science, community development educational counselling and international relations.

6. TECHNOTHERAPY™. A NEW FORM OF THERAPY EMERGING AS AN OFF SHOOT OF INTEGATIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING:


This is an ideal project for psychoogy majors, clinical therapists and social workers. .

We are thought controlled entities and what we think, observe, interpret and thereby respond to, affects our physiology and thereby our sense of well being. .

Knowledgeable people don't find themselves lost in the muddled up world of ours. They can reason things out and thus feel quite self assured, free of anxiety and stress, two of the pressures which eventually, in many cases, lead to depression and other dysfunctional disorders.

A system of psychotherapy called, Technotherapy™ has emerged out of our way of inegrative teaching. It is my belief that if conventional psychotherapy is combined with Technotherapy™, the treatment can be sufficiently shortened and the eventual outcome could also make a person employable or give sufficient incentive and confidence to start on a career path. See www.centerforintegratielearning.org/gpag3.html

This could be an ideal proejct to pursue for pshycology majors, clinical psychologists and social workers.

7. PROVIDING PRACTICAL AND FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE AT THE GRASSROOT LEVEL WITH THE AIM OF IMPROVING HEALTH AND HYGIENE INCLUDING MOTIVATING PEOPLE TOWARDS SCIENCE EDUCATION. THIS PROJECT IS APPLICABLE TO ALL PEOPLE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.

This could be an ideal project for public health workers at the local and the global level..

For this project my slogan is: Plant microscopes, not cluster bombs! Isn’t that how our society had its start, through Leeuvenhoek’s microcope! Why should the people in the developing counries be any different?

Read the story what just one peak at some polluted water under a miciroscope can do.

A nine year old after seeing this demonstration in an Iranian village pensively remarked “so that is why my mother is always sick.” Need I say more. See the whole story here:
www.iibbt.com/Sepah-eDanish.html.

We do not need millions of dollars to bring a global change in terms of health and hygiene. All we need is one microscope per village!


8. ASSESSING THE MANNER OF SCIENCE TEACHING IN SCHOOLS, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES AND THEN DESIGNING MEANS TO REVIVE AND PROMOTE HANDS-ON SCIENCE TEACHING IN SCHOOLS, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITEIS:


This could be an ideal projct for Ed majors involved with curriculum design and implementation. Also for bio-med egineering students learning to restore, maintain, sandardize and refurbish science instruments.

There are four aspects of this problem in the current educational climate which are preventing this from happening.

One, since the sixties and more so now, many four year universities and colleges have been phasing out their hands-on science laboratories relegating this type of teaching to the Community Colleges.

The understanding for this arrangemnt was that what the students would learn at the Community Colleges will dovetail into what the students will be learning at the four year colleges.

This requires an ongoing liason between the Community Colleges and the four year colleges particularly regarding the contents of the curriculum at both institutions. This has not happened and the Community Colleges in fact have become their own self governing entities designing and implementing their own curriculum mostly aimed towards job preparation yet the credits they award are tansferrable to the four year colleges even though the course contents of such courses may have no relevance to what would be needed to continue learnning at the four year colleges..

Two, the lab supplies which once were freely available have progressively become less and less available, as many vendors have closed shop, which makes teaching a hands-on science course difficult. Also what lab supplies are now available are designed for clinical or research labs and therefore are very expensive which with budgetry constraints makes instructors and administrtors to cut down lab sessions thus fragmenting learning and loosing continuity of what the students need to know and learn.

Three, most Community college and even four year college insructors are coming from a research background many of whom have not studied the subject they are assigned to teach. Many thus teach about their research area and not the core contents of the subject which fails to prepare students for a broader understanding of the subejct and its application to jobs, professions and life.

Four. Another stumbling block in hands-on teaching is the lack of basic lab equipment in the classroom. This is an acute problem specially for schools located in the poor neighborhoods which you can regard as “instrument deserts”. Our solution to this problem is to restore and refurbish used and discarded lab instruments and make them available to schools; see our video regarding this project here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07LorXLAkCM.

This is an interesting projects for interns to get involved with as they will learn a whole lot about refurbishing, restoring and maintaining and using basic lab instruments which know-how they can then apply to starting their own instrument repair business. This project will also involve conducting a survey to determine the degree to which various schools are equipped with the needed basic science instruments and if the teachers are equipped to use the available instruments.

This project also has environmental imnpact as discarded instruments will be kept out of land fills.

This project will also require tracking the journey and the ultimate fate of the instruments from the time of their purchase and hen they are ultimately declared surplus.

Our approach to resolve this dilemma is two fold:

One, we have developed a mini catalog of the essential lab supplies needed for teaching a comprehensive lab course in Microbiology and Immunology. This catalog not only provideds the essential supplies but also provides them at much less of a cost than available from the market.

These supplies are also designated as generic supplies not intended for clinical or research use. With this catalog, budgetry constraints would not prevent the instructors from teaching a comprehensive hands-on lab courses.

Two, by making an ongoing consultation available to teachers and instructors in selecting designing and implementing lesson plans instead of purchasing lesson plans from the vendors, this project will not only save hard to comeby funds but also will ensure that the lesson plans are applicable to their particular class room needs.

By providing such consultation opportunities we are also indirectly training the teachers and the instructors augmenting their professional abilities as hands-on lab based teachers.

9. DESIGN CURRICULUM FOR TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOMENT OF SCIENCE INSTRUCTORS AND TEACHERS:

In ddition to providing profesional development via consultation as mentioed above, we also provide hands-on workshops and courses to instructors and teachers specially designed for them to function in a lab based class room setting.

Currently professional development is being done via universities and colleges under the assumption that since colleges and universieis are the centers of learning, they will be able to provide more thorough and custom made training. This is not happening because the universities and colleges attract teachers by offering them graduate credits for the training. This the participants like because then they can apply those credits towards their graduate educaiton earning a Master’s or a PhD degree which makes them eligible for a higher salary bracket.

Teachers thus prefer to get their professional training via universities and colleges even though their training may or may not be relevant to the professional development they need. The universities and colleges also subsidize their tuition fee via grants from the Natioal Science Foundation or other govrnment and non governmental agencies making the training opportunity more attractive for the teachers even though the training does not serve the purpsoe at hand.

10. GREEN MICROBIOLOGY - DEVELOPING A HANDS-ON COURSE WHICH WE HAVE DESIGNATED AS GREEN MICROBIOLOGY FOR THE SOLE PURPOSE OF REMOVING FEAR ABOUT WORKING WITH MICROBES.

This could be an ideal project for Ed majors, teachers and administrators involved with curriculum design.

If there is one aspect of Microbiology wich prevented it from becoming mainstream, it is the fear in those who would be working with the microbes. Yet by only working with the microbes that one acquires the basic knowledge of this subejct and how to apply its knowledge for the betterment of human, animnal and plant life including the qualaity of our environment.

In order to overcome this fear, we are developing a course called GREEN MICROBIOLOGYwhere only non disease producing organisms, such as those used in fermentation and dairy industrires e.g., species of Lactobacilli, Acetobacter and similar other species will be used to impart all of the functional know-how of Microbiology.

Interns are encouraged to participate in the development of this course as it is likely to broaden their horizons about microbiology, biology, science and teaching.

11. GLOBAL OUTREACH - OUR TANZANIA PROJECT, PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF AIDS AND MALARIA VIA HANDS-ON SCIENCE EDUCATION FOCUSSING ON HYYGIENE.


This could be an ideal project for public health workers, business administation, marketing and International studies majors.

Most people believe that only govrnments and heavily funded not for profit agencies have the means to erridicate these diseases yet there is a grassroot effort pioneered by a young man who, with his friends made 700,000 bricks and then used those bricks to build a small school house where he is trying to teach science, health and hygiene to 150 fifteen and eighteen year olds but he has hardly any science equipment which we have pronmised to provide him.

This project involves how to set up a functional hands-on science teaching lab in a developing country with limited resources and how to guide the local teachers remotely perhaps via Skype or videos. This project also involves preparing lesson plans and delivering those lesson plans.

This project also invoves raising funds for the implementation of this project, especially for the transportaiton of the instruments and would thus require some marketing.

12. DROP OUT PREVENTION VIA PROVIDING HEAD START FOR JOBS AND CAREERS IN THE MEDICAL AND PARA-MEDICAL PROFESSIONS, FOODS, PHARMACEUTIAL, COSMETIC AND FERMENTATION INDUSTRIES INCLUDING AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES.

This could be an ideal projet for social workers and community outreach professionals.

Most students drop out becaue they find the fragmented system of teaching boring and unappealing. Yet they are intelligent people who make this difficult decision knowingly yet given the right exposure via integrative and hands-on learning they get sufficiently motivated to continue their education.

Within the prevailing conventional mode of thinking, the above description and the accompanying claim may sound rather far fetched to many yet our experience proves otherwise.

This happened during the early days of Neighborhood Youth Corps (NYC) when we conduced a hands-on science program for junrios and seniors from the Chicago Public Schools. The project involved teaching them in a hands-on fashion in a lab setting about science via microbiology for half a day every day and sending them to work in a university lab for the rest of the day.

But before putting them in the classes, we had asked the Labor Department to test them as to their reading, writing and math abilities. They tested on the average at a second and third grade level yet they performed so well in the lab absed trainiing that within two to three weeks they were talking about E.coli and other organisms and how to stain and identify them. This same group of students when placed in the clinical and research labs of the University of Illinois in Chicago also performed very well absorbing what they observed and understood there.

At the end of the ten week program this same group was taken on a field trip to the Abbott Labs where they were able to undersand what the various workers and researchers were doing.

What a trransformation for students with only second and third grade reading and writing abilities! Reviving and providing this type of educational experieicen can thus salvage many a drop out students who have given up trying or were considering to drop out.

13. GRANT WRITING, SEEKING FUNDING:

This is a field by itself and a vital one at that with numerous requirements, registration and guidelines which could vary from donor to donor, some even requiring that the applicant must have an annual budget of atleast one muillion dollars before they even consider their application.

Right fom the start you can thus see that grants are not for the grassroot or just starting from scratch efforts. Within these requirements you can also realize why new ideas which need the most nurturing rarely if ever get to the donors and philanthropists.

This project would require persistance and planning and a whole lot of foot work but it will be an ideal experience for those aiming to enter the not for profit field or interested in promoting new ideas or opening new avenues in new and ongoing research.

14. ECOLOGY OF EDUCATION:

This multifaced project could be ideal for anyone but specially for social workers and those involved with education councelling, specially guiding youth with their education issues.

The current state of education is such that it needs to be studied in depth to fully undestand how ineffcgtive it has become, polluted or taken off course. This is vital because the outcome of this project would have far reaching affects on our overall educational format of teaching and learning and it will require a team effort to do it justice. I am, therefor, looking for a team of students to work on this project; see description below:

THE ECOLOGY OF EDUCATION; A DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT:

While I am a Microbiologist by training, my interests also extend into social issues especially education because education affects all aspects of our society and life. Therefore, the more we know how our educational system is set up and how well it is functioning, the more we can relate it to the quality of life and the quality of society it is producing.

I have purposely picked the title of this project as the ECOLOGY OF EDUCATION because all systems whether natural or man made function best when there is an ecological balance in them such that the various segments of the system are so well dovetailed that they function as a whole in unison or in tandem ensuring the over all functionality and survival of the system. Sure, the system goes through evolutionary changes but it still retains its overall functionally and purpose, often but not always, improving in the process.

In this context when we examine any ecological system, we prefer to examine it as a whole but often, of necessity, we have to take it apart and study its individual parts but without loosing the location and function of those parts in the overall scheme of things.

Education, in such an ecological context, has never been studied mainly because it has been pushed and pulled apart from so many sides and by so many factors and forces that to know its totality and thereby its functionality has been a difficult if not an impossible task.

The main part of this study thus will be focused on understanding and deciphering the existing infrastructure of our educational system. That infrastructure of necessity is not a linear system but a multifaceted much intertwined system which in many ways is analogous to a biological eco system; healthy when in balance and sick when polluted and therefore out of balance.

So far, therefore, we have been contended by looking at the isolated parts of education and hoping that by assigning these parts certain functions and then examining and testing the efficacy of those parts will show us what education is all about and how well it is functioning and delivering on its goals.

Despite numerous such fragmented studies we are still in the dark about the inner and often the hidden and not so obvious aspects of education’s workings. Consequently, education is increasingly becoming an enigma affecting all aspects of life locally and globally with no relief in sight.

The purpose of this proposed study would thus be to first put all the isolated parts of the educational system together and then see how each part functions and affects the overall performance of the system. This will have to begin with a historical perspective of the educational system and how it has come to be where it is now.

This will require studying all the forces and factors, may they be financial, political, pedagogical or those belonging to the infrastructure of the educational system itself such as funding, thereby income, and finally the categories of expenditure so to achieve a complete accountability of the system.

Such a study will thus give an ecological perspective of the overall educational structure and will hopefully show areas where the system has become out of balance thus affecting the overall health of the system.

Corrections can then be logically proposed to bring the system to an even keel. This will be a welcome departure from the hit and miss manner of the various midway corrections now being proposed and implemented most of which are analogous to robbing Peter to Pay Paul or side swiping the main issue but explaining or justifying the prevailing practice in question in anyway possible thus retaining the status quo. It is to get out of or retaining this perpetual status quo that this study is important.

Additionally with accountability, this study can show how best to budget and prioritize what must take precedence over the superfluous including the fashionable and the impressive rhetoric which often ends up disguising the real state of health of our educational system. But the rhetoric has its political value as it enables us to make promises to appease the people. Consequently, only an in depth ecological study of the educational system where all of its components and their affects are accounted for can show the hidden anomalies enabling us to eventually do some serious course correction.

Research for intance became the rage after he dicovery of antibiotics and then after the discovery of DNA structure. This is where the industry and the academia began to have conflict of interst which President Ronald Reagan resolved by declaring that all research done with the public funds would be regardied to be in the public domnain and thus freely available to everyone including the industries and the businesses.

Subsequent to this, amicable and legal arrangements had to be made to safeguard the patent rights of the faculty ivolved with any and all discoveries. There was thus much give and take at this juncture and now the system has become quite stable wherein indusry can fund universiry researh with mutual benefits except that such benefits lean more towards the industry because they get to have the expertise of the faculty at much less of a cost than if they hired such manpower on their own. Plus industry also ends up getting all the specialized facilities of the universities such as class four isolation facilities for genetic enginerng and infetious disease work which are expensiev to set up and maintain.

With all of the above, and more in mind, some of the areas needing in-depth analysis would thus be:

(a) Teaching verses research and time and resources allocated to each.
(b) Source of funding i.e., governmental, business, grants, donations and endowments and their allocation to teaching verses research.
(c) Staffing for teaching such as faculty, adjunct faculty and /or graduate students.
(d) Staffing for research such as faculty, graduate and undergraduate students. Lately undergraduate students, even freshmen students, are encouraged to join existing research teams which practice takes away time from reading and doing independent learning but the students and their parents regard this “research” as a prestigious activity and thus encouraged at the expense of serious learning. .
(e) How marriage between the academia and the industry is affecting research and
teaching.
(f) How courses are being diluted down to make more room for research.
(g) How undergraduate courses taken at the Community Coleges are found sufficient to meet course requirements at the graduate level.

Implementation of the proposed ecology of education study:

As can be seen from the above description, this project is not a one person project but needs a team effort and I am open to that and would welcome up to six or eight students to focus on this study as a team. They do not have to meet in person at all times as I encourage them to share their findings with each other and with me via e-mails and other technology avenues. At the end though I expect a report depicting a consolidation of their findings with suggestions if any. I am hoping this study to become a White Paper on education with due credit given to all participants.


13. FROM TROOPS TO TEACHERS - REHABILITATING THE RETURNING WAR VETERANS:

This project would require undertanding what it takes to become a teacher and how to bring the war veterans to fulfill those reuirements. Additionaly how to make them not just teachers in the conventional terms but good teachers. Here equippping the teachers with hands-on science teaching by using all the basic science instrumemts would ut them in a category above the conventional teachers thus making them more employable.

Also, even if they lacked all or some of the requirements to become certified teachers, they can enter the school system as lab asistants helping the science teacher to teach hands-on sciecne as opposed o he conventional book science which is now the norm.

In any case, science teaching can be immensily inproved bringing and retaining more studets into science based jobs and careers.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20 but negotiableable

Qualifications of a Student:
No prerequisites. Just willingness to learn and apply diligently.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Learn what we are doing and why. Become part yet do your own thing i.e., pursue your assigned or agreed upon project. Also know what others are doing and learn from them and also teach them. That has the way of not only shortening the journey for everyone but also getting exposed to various unknown horizons in the process. Just do not isolate yourself. You may be an island but the water all around you will keep running over your shores. Be aware of that and cherish it, getting your feet wet, instead of running away from the water and its stimulating beauty, energies and its rumble. That is your link to Nature and also to Humanity and the Creator.

Here is a useful mantra, a sort of a litmus test as it will help you decide before acting: WHAT COULD OR WOULD HAPPEN IF...

IF EVERYONE ASKED THAT QUESTION BEFORE PLANNING BUT FOR SURE BEFORE ACTING OR IMPLEMENTING, THE WORLD WOULD BE A BETTER PLACE AS ALL OF US COLLECTIVELY WILL MAKE LESS MISTAKES AND WILL ALSO KEEP OUR EGOS UNDER CHECK.

Contact researcher via URE Email Webform




Patricia Harkin

Email Address: pharkin@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Communication
Secondary Department: English
Title: Professor
Office: 1152B BSB Phone: 413-5406
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
I am looking for a student who can help me to assess a pilot class of the Intergroup Dialogue Program. As a member of the IDG Task Force, and the instructor of record on the pilot course (Comm 494) t be offered in spring 2011, I need a student who has knowledge of quantitative and qualitative assessment methods and data analysis.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
A social science major
junior or senior status
interest in diversity issues
some coursework in empirical methods

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
1. data analysis
2. development of questionnaire(s) to administer to students, 3. faculty and staff who have participated in the program
research into previous assessments of courses in IGD at other institutions, particularly the University of Michigan

Contact researcher via URE Email Webform




Martin Harrow

Email Address: mharrow@psych.uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Office: 445 PI M/C 912 Phone: 9963585

Research Interest:
Schizophrenia; Factors involved in recovery in schizophrenia; Psychosis; Disordered thinking in schizophrenia; Functioning and adjustment in schizophrenia.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Freshman, sophomore, or junior, with an interest in psychiatric disorders

Contact researcher via URE Email Webform




Memoona Hasnain

Email Address: memoona@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Family Medicine
Secondary Department: Public Health
Title: Professor, Associate Head for Faculty Development & Research
Office: 1919 West Taylor, Room 145 Phone: 312-996-8214
Webpage: http://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/departments___programs/departments/fammed/research/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Social determinants of health, women’s health, quality care issues for understudied and at-risk minorities, interprofessional collaborative education and care.

Development and evaluation of educational interventions that promote leadership & scholarship and ensure that future health care providers can effectively address quality and health disparities issues.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in health care, prior research experience plus, positive attitude with strong professionalism and work ethics a must.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will participate in assisting with various tasks related to a number of ongoing research projects and grant writing.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Rooshey Hasnain

Email Address: roosheyh@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Disability and Human Development
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Office: 548 Phone: 312-413-0416
Webpage: http://adoptil.org; http://pride.ahslabs.uic.edu; https://ahs.uic.edu/disability-human-development/directory/hasnain-rooshey/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Disability Studies
Asian Mental Health
Community Engagement
Stigma Reduction
Immigrant and Refugee Initiatives
Rehabilitation Sciences
Cross-Cultural Disability Issues
Cultural and Linguistic Competency
Disability Inclusion
Quality of Life
Family Studies
Social Justice/Human Rights
Employment

Short Bio
My primary professional interest is in understanding the lives, challenges, and strengths of people with disabilities and mental health conditions, especially those from refugee and immigrant backgrounds. I work on finding ways to reduce cultural stigma associated with disability and mental health issues, and ways to promote a human rights perspective on behalf of underserved individuals, their families, and their communities.

I am the Principal Investigator of Partners of Refugees in Illinois Disability Employment (PRIDE) Project which aims to support Illinois-based job-seeking refugees with disabilities in accessing employment and career opportunities.
The project endeavors to build capacity of service providers to support refugees with disabilities in finding employment, train and support refugees with disabilities in pursuing competitive, integrated employment and self-employment, develop and use a web-based tool to connect disabled refugees with VR providers and potential employers, and share work related success stories of refugees.

PRIDE will train at least 50 job-seeking refugees with disabilities through various one-to-one personalized and group training workshops. It will forge new connections among service providers, employers, and the vocational rehabilitation (VR) system.

Before applying, please read about the PRIDE project from http://pride.ahslabs.uic.edu/

Outside of PRIDE, I am also involved in a variety of other projects as well that focus on cross cultural issues and stigma pertaining to disability and mental health in partnership with multicultural groups.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
The student should be committed, hard-working, showing willingness to learn, and interested in Disability, Rights and Advocacy and Social Justice. Having a valid driving license and owning a car with auto insurance is preferable. You'll need to have a GPA of at least 3.0 in your last year or so, and it is helpful if the student has experience working in the community.

3rd or 4th year honors college student preference
open-ended major

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will support the investigators in communicating with partner agencies, in data collection and data management efforts, and facilitating meetings. The student will also provide help in project training and dissemination activities, including scheduling trainings, answering phones; following up with participants and partner agencies, entering data, supporting project mailing and outreach, and producing written reports and other outputs..

Assisting with a wide range of program development, curriculum, advocacy, outreach and partnership development, and research activities.

Contact researcher via URE Email Webform




Heather Ana Hathaway Miranda

Email Address: hhatha2@uic.edu
College: Education Department: Educational Policy Studies
Title: PhD student; Former ED Instructor; Former Research Specialist

Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Spanish/English bilingual; cultural competency preferred; experience with college student populations of color; evidence in coursework on race, ethnicity, cultural studies; minimum sophomore standing

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Rachel Havrelock

Email Address: raheleh@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1909 UH Phone: 312-413-4689
Webpage: http://www.freshwaterlab.org
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The Great Lakes
Environmental Humanities
Transboundary water systems
water diplomacy
resource sovereignty
fossil fuels and renewable energy
oil pipelines
storytelling/oral history
bioregionalism

religion and biblical studies

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Ideally, the student will be a major in the humanities with significant research and writing experience. A junior or senior is preferred. Organizational skills and flexibility are both important. Some knowledge of environmental or ecological matters encouraged.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
My larger project is the Freshwater Lab, an initiative to communicate Great Lakes water issues to the general public, create tools to visualize the current state and future scenarios of water sources, engage unaffiliated groups in water planning, and train a new generation of Great Lakes leaders. As we focus on the Great Lakes basin, we also reach outward to build relationships with water stewards from other parts of the world.

The Freshwater Lab works in seven areas including the role of culture in water stewardship and peacemaking, digital storytelling, oil pipelines, environmental justice, water delivery and lead pipes, water cost and the human right to water, and water diplomacy.

See here for more: http://www.freshwaterlab.org/projects/

We are currently building our digital storytelling platform, Freshwater Stories, and preparing for a launch this fall.

In addition to these research areas, I am interested in working with students on a range of local or international water issues as well as communication and dissemination.

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Bin He

Email Address: tshuo@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Microbiology and Immunology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 8035 COMRB M/C 790 Phone: 9962391
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcmi/faculty/he/index.htm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Virus-host interaction; Innate immunity, Biology of viruses and viral pathogenesis

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: None

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of courses in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, and microbiology

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
A motivated student who is interested in biomedical research.

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Jennifer Hebert-Beirne

Email Address: jheber1@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Community Health Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 645 Phone: 50887
Webpage: http://immigration.psch.uic.edu/whoweare/jennifer-hebert-beirne-phd
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Community-based participatory research, community health, health equity, immigration, acculturation, social determinants of health, women's health, qualitative and mixed-methods

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10-15

Qualifications of a Student:

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Strong English-Spanish bilingual (preferred) student needed immediately to support an ongoing community health assessment in North and South Lawndale community areas. Student will be trained in data collection and analysis. This will require approximately 5-15 hours of work with the opportunity to continue once more data is collected. Will be supervised by Jennifer Hebert-Beirne (http://publichealth.uic.edu/about-sph/profiles) Assistant Professor in Community Health Sciences School of Public Health and will be provided with a computer and office space in the School of Public Health.

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Sam Hedayat

Email Address: hedayat@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
Title: UIC Distinguished Professor
Office: 525 SEO M/C 249 Phone: 312-996-4831
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~hedayat
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Medical Statistics; Forensic Statistics; Environmental Statistics, Design of Experiments, Survey Sampling, Surveillance Methodology, Monitoring Clinical Trials, and Agreement Theory and Methodologies.More information on my research interest and activities can be found on my UIC website
http://www.uic.edu/~hedayat
Also I recommend that you see my web site where my former PhD students are currently employed.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Science major with sincere interest in statistics, data collections and data analyses, and inference.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Read and summarize information and be interested to prepare articles for possible publication and attending some of our statistics seminars.

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Mitchel J Hendrickson

Email Address: mjhend@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Anthropology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: BSB 2138C
Webpage: https://anth.uic.edu/uic-anthropology/people/faculty/mjhend
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
I am a Southeast Asian archaeologist specializing in the Khmer Empire, the vast state that built the famous temples of Angkor and controlled vast areas of mainland SE Asia between the 9th to 15th centuries AD.

My research has studied the history and function of the Khmer road system that connected Angkor to its provincial territories and also the extent of the actual empire through a study of water reservoirs and settlement. Currently I am interested in the role of iron production in the expansion of the state and the possibility that an ethnic minority, the Kuay, were responsible for creating this important resource for the majority Khmer state.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
High GPA, experience with photograpy and lighting and computer programs, 3D modelling a plus. Anthropology major (preferred but not restricted).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will employ digital photography, computer graphics packages and computer modelling systems to develop 3-D and 2-D archaeological site plans.

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Rosilie Hernandez-Pecoraro

Email Address: rosieher@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies
Title: Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies
Office: 1732 University Hall Phone: 312 355 0959
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Early Modern Spain: Culture, Literature, and History. Cervantes Studies. Gender Studies.

I am currently working on a book project on the transition from early modernity to modernity as made palpable in Miguel de Cervantes's Don Quixote.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
Experience with literature, film, and/or cultural studies coursework. Knowledge of Spanish desirable but not necessary.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will help me construct an annotated bibliography that will aid me in the development the above-described book project. Students will compose analytical summaries of articles and books. They will also learn to perform archival work and bibliographical work.

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Patricia Hershberger

Email Address: phersh@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Women, Child, and Family Health Sciences
Title: Associate Professor
Phone: 312-996-1305
Webpage: http://www.nursing.uic.edu/faculty-staff/patricia-hershberger-phd-msn-aprn-fnp-bc
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Hershberger’s research aims to assist patients and families as they make decisions that involve the use of advanced reproductive or genomic biotechnologies. For example, her research examines how young women with cancer decide whether to undergo egg or embryo freezing prior to their cancer therapy. Another of Dr. Hershberger's studies examines how genetically at-risk couples decide whether to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis to prevent the transmission of known genetic disorders to their future child(ren). More information about Dr. Hershberger and her research can be found at: http://www.nursing.uic.edu/faculty-staff/patricia-hershberger-phd-msn-aprn-fnp-bc.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior level nursing or other health professional students that are highly organized, dependable, motivated, and able to work well independently would most enjoy their research experience on my team. Computer skills are needed as many activities related to my research are computer based. Excellent communication skills are also essential.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Days and hours can be flexible but students must be able to complete activities on-time. Research activities may include: assisting with the recruitment of subjects, performing library and electronic literature searches, data entry, following-up with research related phone calls or email messages, or other study activities as directed by Dr. Hershberger. Please know that many activities will require computer related activities.

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Ahlke Heydemann

Email Address: ahlkeh@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Physiology and Biophysics
Title: Assistant professor
Office: COMRB 2035 Phone: 312-355-0259
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The lab has interests in muscular dystrophy, high fat diet-induced type 2 diabetes and wound healing. We utilize mouse models to investigate these conditions to identify important molecular pathways which can become potential therapeutic targets. We use a number of genetic, molecular and biochemical approaches to further our knowledge.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
The only requirements are good organization and communication skills.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be expected to learn and perform various procedures, ultimately the student will be required to be able to perform the procedures independently. Example procedures; DNA extraction from tissue and genotyping PCR reactions, microscopic quantification of ear wound size, preparing tissue, running a protein western blot, and biochemical techniques to quantify fibrosis.

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Jason Ralph Hickok

Email Address: jhicko1@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Title: Assistant Director UICentre
Office: 505 COP Phone: 3129667254
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I coordinate all of the projects in the campus wide drug discovery center, UICentre. We have projects on numerous disease states including: cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, pulmonary hypertension, epileptogenesis, anti-infectives, and sleep apnea.

Our projects focus on all of the aspects of early drug discovery. We put together teams of scientists to generate novel small molecules that target proteins of interests.

Opportunities range from synthetic chemistry to bioassay development for high throughput screening to drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 25

Qualifications of a Student:
Be excellent. Be smart. Be hard working.
All science majors welcome. Honors college preferred.
3.5 GPA minimum.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be required to demonstrate the ability to run scientific experiments independently and generate excellent and reliable data.

Details will vary with project and talents of the student.

Students will be trained extensively. Once students are are trained, they will be act as lab techs that run experiments independently. Techs will always be aided in experimental design and analysis as needed.

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Stewart Roger Hicks

Email Address: hickss@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Architecture
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 3100 A+D Studios, MC030 Phone: 6099336691
Webpage: http://www.designwith.co
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Overlaps between the disciplines of Architecture and Literature including the concepts of character, narrative, fiction and communication.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Architecture majors preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Project background research, design iteration, drawing, and model building.

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Hannah B Higgins

Email Address: higgins@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Art History
Title: Professor
Office: 208C HH M/C 201 Phone: 4132089
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Food Art
Grids
Early Computer Art
Avant-Garde Art
Performance Art
Social Practice Art

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Basic research and critical reading skills required. Working knowledge of interdisciplinary art practices. Interest in museums a plus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Garden for a Changing Climate CURA Project

I am seeking a student collaborator for research toward the realization of a Humanities Without Walls (HWW) curatorial project by the artist, Jenny Kendler, called "Garden for a Changing Climate." The exhibition will be hosted by UIC's Gallery 400 during Spring 2018. In coordination with Lorelei Stewart, Director, the exhibition will chart the pace of climate change by moving planters through four Chicago neighborhoods. By partnering with local community organizations, the exhibition seeks to model for a grass roots public art practice. As the Director of the new interdisciplinary arts (IDEAS) major in the School of Art and Arty History, Hannah B Higgins seeks an undergraduate research partner to assist in facilitating (and documenting in various formats) the relationship between G400, the artist, and the community partners. The successful candidate will learn how social practice art can facilitate dialogue between two public universities (UIC and UWM), as well as between UIC and various neighborhood organizations.

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David Hilbert

Email Address: hilbert@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Philosophy
Title: Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
Office: 1422 UH M/C 267 Phone: 9965490
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~hilbert/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interests center on philosophical and theoretical issues concerning perception and draws on a wide range of sources from both philosophy and the scientific study of perception.

The main focus of my current work is on issues concerning perceptual constancies (stability in perception in spite of changing stimulus). I'm interested in questions concerning the nature of the processes by which constancy is achieved and also questions about the nature of our experience of constancy.

I'm also working on a survey of philosophical issues concerning vision which will involve reviewing the literature on vision in philosophy and relevant scientific work on vision.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
No philosophy is necessary. Some background in philosophy or sensory physiology would be helpful but is not necessary. Some small amount of mathematics (elementary algebra) and basic statistics would also be useful but is also not necessary.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I'm a philosopher, not a lab scientist, so the work would primarily involve locating, reading, summarizing and discussing articles from the philosophical and scientific literature. There would be some work with research databases and some library work involved. For a student with the right skills there may be some very basic data analysis.

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James Ho

Email Address: jimho@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Information and Decision Sciences
Office: 2407 UH M/C 294 Phone: 9960819
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~jimho

Research Interest:
Multi-lingual e-mail support for electronic commerce

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Fluency (written and spoken) in a second language; Some skill/experience/interest in the Internet and WWW.

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Charles Hoch

Email Address: chashoch@uic.edu
College: Urban Planning and Public Affairs Department: Urban Planning and Policy
Office: 241 CUPPAH M/C 348 Phone: 9962156

Research Interest:
Homeless in US Cities (Who are they? What do they need? What can be done?); Do City Plans Work? (Do cities follow the plans they make? How can we tell? Do plans make an important difference?) Can we make sustainable cities and regions? (How do we balance current and future needs using the built environment?)

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Willingness and interest in doing some document research, doing some digital photography of sites and visiting some places in the Chicago region; Familiarity with computer spread sheet and database programs would be nice.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student might prepare briefing reports on specific aspects of the housing affordability problem as it affects the very poor; or reports comparing the differences in community or municipal plans for future sustainable development.

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Stacey Horn

Email Address: sshorn@uic.edu
College: Education Department: Education
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Professor
Office: 3507 EPASW M/C 147 Phone: 4133679
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Social cognition in adolescents; social reasoning about exclusion and discrimination based on gender and sexuality; safe schools for LGBT youth; bias and stigma based on religion and sexuality

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Some background in psychology and/or education, interest in research methods (both qualitative and quantitative), interest in adolescents

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Library research, transcription of interviews, some data collection (perhaps interviewing), data entry and management, research team meetings, general project management.

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Craig Alan Horswill

Email Address: horswill@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Kinesiology and Nutrition
Title: Clinical Associate Professor
Office: 343 PEB Phone: 312-996-5656
Webpage: http://www.ahs.uic.edu/facultyresearch/profiles/name,8712,en.html
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Horswill conducts research on hydration and exercise in hot environments to understand how such stress affects physical performance and physiology of the body. He is very interested in physical performance particularly intermittent high intensity efforts such as in stop-and-go sports and how nutritional status affects such performance. He has also done research in pediatrics, studying effects of exercise, nutrition, and drug therapies on metabolism, growth, and body composition changes in children and adolescents.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA of 3.4

Preferred major: Kinesiology & Nutrition

Sophomore standing or higher

Prerequisite courses: KN200 (or equivalent course in statistical methods), KN300 (literature reviews), and KN352 (exercise physiology)

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
*Reading, summarizing, and discussing original research (published research papers);

*Work in the lab collecting data collection and conducting pilot studies, which include exercise tests for maximum oxygen consumption, anaerobic power, and strength, and assessing body composition and hydration status;

*Presenting research findings at the department symposium or UIC Student Research Forum

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Guochang Hu

Email Address: gchu@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pharmacology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 544 CMW Phone: 64692
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcph/falc_hu.htm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My laboratory focuses on the molecular mechanisms of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). The bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) can trigger a systemic hyper-inflammatory response that subsequently leads to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. LPS binding to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induces the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) resulting in production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When this production becomes uncontrolled and excessive, it leads to the development of septic shock. Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) accounts for as many as one-third of all deaths attributed to acute lung injury. In particular, the risk of VILI is increased in the patients with sepsis and pneumonia. Evidence has supported the concept that development of pulmonary inflammation in response to mechanical stress results in polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) infiltration into the lung tissue and hence lung injury. We are interested in identifying signal pathways modulating sepsis- and ventilator-induced inflammation and lung injury.

Another research interest is the molecular mechanisms regulating endothelial permeability. An important function of the endothelium is to regulate the transport of liquid and solutes across the semi-permeable vascular endothelial barrier. Two cellular pathways have been identified controlling endothelial barrier function. The normally restrictive paracellular pathway, which can become "leaky" during inflammation when gaps are induced between endothelial cells at the level of adherens and tight junctional complexes, and the transcellular pathway, which transports plasma proteins the size of albumin via transcytosis in vesicle carriers originating from cell surface caveolae. We are interested in elucidating the signaling mechanisms that regulate paracellular and transcellular endothelial permeability pathways in response to inflammatory insults.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
None

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Hard-working students who are interested in biomedical research.

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Nicholas Huggett

Email Address: huggett@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Philosophy
Title: Beyond Spacetime
Office: 1413 UH M/C 267
Webpage: http://www.beyondspacetime.net
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My current research involves a multi-year project between UIC and the University of Geneva. We are studying the philosophical questions and implications of theories of quantum gravity -- string theory, loop quantum gravity, and others. In short, physics has fundamentally changed our conception of space and time, from Aristotle, to Galileo, to Newton, to Einstein -- from absolute to relative, from flat to curved, and from static to dynamic. Quantum gravity is still only barely understood, but already promises a similarly profound shift in our picture of space and time -- perhaps even showing that they are not fundamental, but the appearances of something deeper. Our project is to understand what, and how that could be. You can find more, including videos of lectures, on our website: www.beyondspacetime.net.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 0

Qualifications of a Student:
I am happy to talk to anyone who thinks they are interested, and has some of the necessary skills: some experience in philosophy, some facility with mathematics, and some training in physics. I would expect candidates to have a strength in at least one, but we would also train promising students. In short, if you are interested, and have some relevant knowledge or training, we can talk it over to see if you are a good fit.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
There are a number of ways an undergraduate research assistant could be involved. We have regular talks that a student could attend (including video conference talks from Geneva). We are making educational videos; we would especially like assistance with those, composing, delivering, and producing them. Depending on the student's background, we would help them develop their own written project on philosophy and quantum gravity, with regular meetings with project members. We also hope for assistance on papers we are writing: obtaining articles, compiling bibliographies, proof reading, and acting as a sounding board. We would like to have some programming for undergraduates, and a URA could assist with that.

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Ashley Hughes

Email Address: amhughes@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Biomed and Health Info Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 255
Webpage: https://ahs.uic.edu/biomedical-health-information-sciences/directory/hughes-ashley-m/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Lab research projects seek to optimize health information technologies and medical devices so that they best support clinical work. In particular, I'm interested in promoting collaborative practices and teamwork in healthcare.

To work on projects, RAs would learn about: simulation, measure development and validation, formatting requirements (e.g., APA formatting), statistical analysis, qualitative methods, and literature review techniques.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Majors of Interest: Health Information Management, Psychology, Business, Computer Science, Engineering, Pre-Med, Pre-Dentistry, Pre-health sciences. GPA 3.0 or above. Working knowledge of computers.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
A highly motivated student who is willing to learn additional information to address interdisciplinary research challenges. Must be willing to undergo Human Subject Training. Research is conducted on the west side of campus. Demonstrate the ability to think analytically and think creatively.

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Susan L Hughes

Email Address: shughes@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Community Health Sciences
Title: Professor and Center Director/IHRP
Office: 345 WROB Phone: 61473
Webpage: www.fitandstrong.org
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We design and test evidence-based health promotion/behavior change interventions for older adults- one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S. Our nationally recognized Fit & Strong! program is listed as a top ranked program by CDC and the Administration on Community Living of DHHS. We are currently testing a low vision version of the program working with the Lighthouse for the Blind on the west campus, testing a version of F&S that addressed diet and weight management and developing an online training capacity for F&S instructors.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
public health or other health-related major and honors college students preferred but we would also be happy to talk with students who major in IT and business/marketing and pricing products.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We expect students to be mature and committed to working with us in the field to make a difference in the lives of older adults. We can provide an excellent training for future careers in health related disciplines and other occupations. Students are expected to commit to a regular schedule and stick to it-in return we will provide training, supervision and career mentoring.

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Tonda L Hughes

Email Address: thughes@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Health Systems Science
Secondary Department: Nursing Administration
Title: Professor Emerita

Webpage: http://www.nursing.uic.edu/faculty-staff/tonda-hughes-phd-rn-faan
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Women's use of alcohol; Risk factors for hazardous drinking among women (e.g., depression, violence & victimization); sexual minority women's health; sexual orientation and identity development;

Global health: building nursing capacity in low/middle income countries (especially India and Rwanda); global health for sexual minorities

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Sensitivity to issues relevant to research with minority populations (i.e., lesbian and other sexual minority women); interest in women's health and/or global health

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
There are a variety of possibilities for engaging students in my research. Expectations and experiences will depend, in part, on the students' interests, knowledge, skills and previous experience.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Boris Igic

Email Address: boris@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences

Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/igic/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My lab is a collective of students and postdocs interested in basic research in natural history and evolution. We generally try to understand why there are so many species in some groups and so few in others, as well as which traits are involved in determining the distribution of plant and animal diversity. In addition, we are working on peripherally related projects dealing with language evolution and the nature of species. We generally use computational methods as well as those found in standard molecular biology labs.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
(1) Minimum GPA: 3.50;
(2) Sophomore or Junior standing in the forthcoming semester;
(3) Aptitude for mathematics;
(4) Knowledge of flora and fauna.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be involved in hands-on data collection, experiments, and data analyses. This will often require focus, patience, and persistence, as well as a great deal of creativity.

Mostly, however, I expect ambition and interest in the natural world.

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Jose Iriarte Diaz

Email Address: jiriarte@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Oral Biology
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Assistant professor
Office: COD 432B Phone: 312-355-4268
Webpage: http://jiriarte.people.uic.edu
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Functional morphology and biomechanics

I am interested in the relationship between morphology and organismal performance, particularly focused on the feeding and locomotor system of vertebrates. In my research I use an integrative approach, combining computational and theoretical models with biomechanical and physiological experiments (e.g., 3D kinematics, electromyography, energetics). I have studied several aspects of animal locomotion, from gait transitions in rodents to flight mechanics in bats, and how overall morphology affects locomotory abilities of organisms. Currently I am working on the biomechanics of feeding in mammals, focused on the relationship between functional complexity and the variability in performance of the feeding apparatus.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Bilgay Izci Balserak

Email Address: bilgay@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Biobehavioral Health Science
Secondary Department: Women, Child, and Family Health Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 638 Phone: 9962718
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Izci Balserak’s research focuses on women's health (including childbearing and midlife women) with an emphasis on sleep disturbances, circadian rhythms, clock genes and their relevance to adverse health outcomes (i.e. cardiometabolic health outcomes). Her specific research attention is dedicated to (1) assessing the sleep-related determinants of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes (i.e. pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes and intrauterine growth retardation), (2) identifying the risk factors for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), (3) producing a screening tool for SDB in the pregnant population, (4)identifying circadian genes associated with adverse health outcomes and (5) developing behavioral interventions to prevent sleep-related metabolic adverse health outcomes.
Her current work aims to determine whether an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with circadian genes, SDB, short sleep duration and low percentage of delta power (slow wave sleep). The secondary aim is to examine whether SDB is associated with increased inflammatory biomarkers such as IL-6 and CRP.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Nursing, psychology, biology, premed and engineering students are encouraged to apply for this unique position; however, any serious applicant will be considered. The most preferred qualification is reliability and paying careful attention to details. Prefer experience with proficient computer skills (e.g., Microsoft office, RedCap, MatLap); experience interacting with pregnant women, good communication skills. This student will work closely with the Research Assistant and Dr. Izci Balserak to support the activities of the project.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You may be able to take part in a number of research activities, including:
• Screening subjects using online medical records
• Working with blood samples
• Evaluating and scoring sleep studies
• Power spectral analysis of EEG (a widely-used and popular method employed in various medical fields)
• Interacting with research subjects
• ...and more
In addition, you will be expected to perform some of the more basic tasks that are crucial to any research operation, including: recruiting subjects, working with the Institutional Review Board for the protection of human subjects, literature review, scanning documents, preparing laboratory materials, etc.

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Lynette A. Jackson

Email Address: lajackso@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Gender and Women's Studies
Secondary Department: African American Studies
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1230 UH Phone: 312-413-2457
Webpage: http://newafricandiaspora.net
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Research Project: New African Diasporas Oral History and Digital Mapping Project. This project collects, analyses and archives the journey narratives of African immigrants, refugess and asylees to Chicago. Very little has been written about the growing African immigrant population in the US, leading one scholar to describe them as "Invisible Sojourners." In many instances, these immigrants and refugees continue to interact with their home countries as well as integrate into the host society. By conducting background research, conducting oral history interviews (individuals and focus groups, we will explore the following questions: 1) How has the nature of Chicago's African diaspora community changed over time; 2) what routes did these communities and individuals travel to get here and what did they bring with them; 3) how do they define and engage with home and homelands; 4) how do they grapple with questions of identity, and 5) how do they integrate into and change the host society? This project is being conducted in conjuction with the Pan African Association.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Seeking juniors or seniors with an interest in one of the following fields: refugee and/or immigration studies, African studies, Diaspora studies, African American studies, contemporary world history and Ethnography.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will conduct oral historical research, help in focus groups, help with archival research and tape transciptions.

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Christopher Janson

Email Address: cjanson@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine
Title: Assistant Professor of Neurology
Office: COMRB 7139 Phone: 312-355-0217
Webpage: TBA
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Janson and Dr. Romanova, the lab leaders, came to UIC in 2015-2016 in order to do world-class research on Alzheimer's disease neuropathology. Our laboratory has diverse interests in blood-brain barrier transport mechanisms, gene therapy, genomics, and drug development. We have developed unique cell lines and resources that no other group in the world has access to. This is an opportunity to become involved with a new laboratory which will use cutting-edge techniques to solve important medical problems. We have a vision to develop human gene therapy and drug treatments for Alzheimer's, through collaborations with other Illinois Medical District researchers.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: TBA

Qualifications of a Student:
Please email or call to discuss if you would be a good fit to work with us. Honors college preference. Some prior laboratory experience is expected, and cell culture experience highly desirable. The key factors we are looking for are intelligence, versatility, and diligence. A prior interest in neurodegeneration is a plus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will be expected to work closely with us on all aspects of day-to-day laboratory maintenance, and will have the chance to participate in a number of cutting edge research projects depending on your skills and motivation.

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Jennifer B Jarrett

Email Address: jarrett8@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Pharmacy Practice
Secondary Department: Family Medicine
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 123 PHARM Phone: 312-996-1098
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Pharmacy education
Medical education
Primary care
Post-graduate training
Faculty development

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Jon P Jarrett

Email Address: jarrett@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Philosophy
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1401 UH M/C 267 Phone: 9968836
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Foundations of quantum mechanics
General Philosophy of Science

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior standing; Interest in math, physics, and philosophy; Familiarity with the library and online resources; Experience with LaTeX desirable but not essential.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Active participation in a weekly meeting to review and discuss preparation of a manuscript covering aspects of Bell's Theorem and the philosophy of science.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Constance J Jeffery

Email Address: cjeffery@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4252 MBRB M/C 567 Phone: 9963168
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/bios/faculty/jeffery/jefferyc.shtml
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The relationship between a protein's sequence, structure, and function; Bioinformatics; Biophysics; X-ray crystal structure determination; Transmembrane Proteins; Cystic fibrosis; Cancer; Tuberculosis; Bacterial multidrug resistance; Interpretation of Genome Sequences; Moonlighting Proteins

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Mostly A's and B's in biology and chemistry classes. Prefer students who have completed Bios352 or Bios452/454.

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Rohan Dexter Jeremiah

Email Address: rjerem@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Community Health Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: SPH 1, Room 658 Phone: 312-355-1137
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Public Health, Global Health, Refugee Health, Health Disparities, Men’s Health

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Some background and/or interests in community health, social sciences, and global health coursework

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
This public health project is part of the Chicago Refugee Men’s Health Initiative to address the global health and well-being of ethnic minority refugee men as an underserved, vulnerable, and minority population in the Chicago area. We are exploring the health needs of recently-arrived refugee men in Chicago within a community-based participatory research study.

Students would assist with preparation of literature reviews and manuscripts, help prepare Institutional Review Board Applications, assist in the development of data collection instruments including surveys and interview guides, attend meetings with refugee service providers and refugee communities, and analyze data.

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Nan Jiang

Email Address: njiang@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 4344 SES Phone: 312 355 3741
Webpage: https://jiang.chem.uic.edu
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our research focuses on applying scanning probe-based nanotechnology in nanostuctures design and properties investigation, and we are currently investigating the chemical properties of single molecules via ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscopy and tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Yuwei Jiang

Email Address: yuweij@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Physiology and Biophysics
Title: assistant professor
Office: 1097 Phone: 37261
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The Jiang lab has broad interests in adipose tissue development, homeostasis, and expansion, with particular focus on elucidating the roles of adipose stem cells in obesity and its associated metabolic comorbidities. We aim (1) to explore the mechanisms that control adipocyte development and maintenance and (2) to understand how these mechanisms go awry in response to metabolic diseases.

Within white adipose tissue, tissue-resident adipose stem cells proliferate and differentiate into either white (energy-storing) or beige (energy-burning) adipocytes, which may hold therapeutic potential to curb the obesity epidemic. Recent work from us and others start to uncover the origins of adipose stem cells and their roles in the formation and maintenance of adipose tissue.

Using cutting-edge tissue-specific, inducible knockout and lineage tracing mouse models, coupled with advanced genomic and imaging approaches, the Jiang laboratory is currently working on two projects: 1) the molecular underpinnings of adipose stem cell lineage control in white adipose tissue development; 2) the mechanisms of beige adipocyte development and maintenance under physiological and pathological conditions. This research will advance our knowledge on adipose stem cell biology and its controlling mechanisms, and will ultimately facilitate the development of therapies to combat obesity and metabolic disease.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
* Preferred majors: Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Bioengineering.

* Minimum GPA: 3.5

* Qualifications:
- Prior lab experience is not required but is a plus.
- Strong willingness to learn new techniques and not be afraid to work with mice.
- A successful candidate will follow directions precisely and pay close attention to details.

Honors College/GPPA students will be given priority.

Students who are motivated and have experience in our lab will become eligible to work half- or full-time during the summer as hourly paid employees.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We are looking for students who desire a long-term laboratory experience in preparation for admission into graduate school or medical school.

Time commitment:
We are expecting students to commit to working in the lab ~12 hours per week and to be able to be in the lab for periods of 3 to 5 hours per day on at least two consecutive days.

Classroom is the priority for a student. But we expect students to be at work on time and to devote work time to work tasks.

Sophomores: We are looking for students who are willing to commit to working in the lab for 2+ years, pending an initial evaluation period.

Juniors need prior research experience in specific research areas (e.g. standard molecular biology techniques like PCR, rtPCR, cell culture work, or working with mice).

* Training plan:
Initially, you will learn basic lab techniques and assist with routine maintenance of the lab. You will then choose a specific project to work on that is appropriate for your time commitment, skill set, and research interest.


The student is expected to attend the weekly research meetings, participate in journal club, and gain the necesssary skills to significantly contribute to at least one project. Students unable to maintain a weekly commitment will not be considered for renewed participation in subsequent years.

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Andrew E Johnson

Email Address: ajohnson@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 2032 ERF Phone: 996-3002
Webpage: http://www.evl.uic.edu/aej
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Visualization, Visual Analytics, Human-Computer Interaction, Collaboration, Virtual Reality,

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
There are a variety of possible projects with different requirements: Some programming experience (javascript / C / Python / node.js / Unity3D) would be helpful, but other valuable experience could be in the areas of user studies, or graphic design, or 3D model making through programs such as Maya, or music/sound design.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will work along side graduate students helping them create, test, and support interactive applications. This could involve writing code, drawing icons, building 3d models, helping with motion-capture, video, creating sound effects, working on web page documentation, helping with user studies, etc.

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Jeremy Johnson

Email Address: jjjohn@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Pharmacy Practice
Title: Cancer prevention with dietary agents
Office: 117 Phone: 312-996-4368
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/pharmacy/depts/Pharmacy_Practice/Faculty_profile/johnsonj.php
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
In our laboratory we are evaluating promising phytochemicals and highly characterized plant extracts for prostate cancer prevention and/or therapy. Of specific interest is the use of rosemary (e.g. carnosol, carnosic acid, etc.) for targeting the androgen and estrogen receptors in prostate cancer. A second project is evaluating the mangosteen fruit from Thailand, which is unrelated to the mango, for targeting specific kinases that are deregulated in cancer. To accomplish this our lab performs in vitro (e.g. cell culture) and in vivo (e.g. xenograft studies, pharmacokinetic, etc.) in order to understand the anti-cancer activity of these compounds.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Laboratory experience in chemistry or biology is desirable.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The majority of work will involve basic cell culture techniques of human prostate cancer cell lines. Cells will be treated with phytochemicals and evaluated for mechanistic purposes. Attention to detail is essential for success.

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Michael E Johnson

Email Address: mjohnson@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor Emeritus
Office: 3074 MBRB Phone: 6-9114
Webpage: http://mjohnson.people.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research group is focused on antibiotic and antiviral development, with particular focus on combating drug resistance. Current projects include developing FabI (enoyl reductase) inhibitors against Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumanii pathogenic bacteria, and protease inhibitors against Zika, Dengue, MERS and SARS viruses. Research methods include one or more of:

(1) Computer-aided molecular design; (2) Biochemical assay development; (3) Protein expression and engineering of mutations; (4) Molecular genetics approaches for mechanism of action

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
(1) Science or engineering major; (2) General chemistry and biology courses (if interested in computational studies, general physics will also be helpful); (3) Minimum gpa: "B" average; (4) Sophomore or higher level

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will be expected to do initial literature research to understand the status and goals of project chosen. Depending on project, the student will develop a hypothesis and perform experiments or computational studies to evaluate the hypothesis. At the end of each semester, the student will be expected to do a brief presentation on their work and its results.

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Robert Johnston

Email Address: johnsto1@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: History
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 930 UH M/C 198 Phone: 4139164
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Contemporary controversies over vaccination. I am writing a book, to be published by Oxford University Press, about activists who have opposed compulsory vaccination over the course of American history, focusing on current struggles involving autism, smallpox and bioterrorism, anthrax in the military, influenza, and HPV. I am interested in working with students who could help explore a wide variety of issues relating to vaccination, including epidemiology, public policy, political struggles, and the moral and scientific conceptions of parents. Research activities could include reviewing the medical literature, examining historical archives, and conducting oral histories of activists.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: No minimum

Qualifications of a Student:
None, beyond a regular facility with the internet. If you have interviewing skills, though, that would be terrific.

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Rachael Mary Jones

Email Address: rjones25@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1081 SPHPI Phone: 312-996-1960
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interests are in the assessment of human exposures to contaminants (e.g. chemicals, particulates and infectious agents) in the environment, and estimation of associated health risks. I approach these problems using experiments, mathematical models and statistical analysis of data. For the upcoming academic year (2018-2019) I have a couple of research activities for which I am looking for student researchers. The general aims of these activities include:l 1) determining the magnitude of dermal exposure to liquid chemicals with and without gloves using experimental simulation, 2) understanding the relationship between noise and air pollutants emitted by traffic using data collected with wearable sensors, 3) describing community exposures resulting from sand mining using literature review, 4) comparing statistical methods for interpolating/modeling environmental pollutant levels over space, and 5) measuring turbulence in indoor work environments using anemometry and tracer gases.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Our research team has lots of different types of activities, and we will find an activity that builds your skills.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Expectations will vary between projects. I expect students to be independently motivated to learn and contribute to the research activities.

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Min J. Joo

Email Address: joo@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Medical Education
Title: associate professor of medicine
Office: 3129968039
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
COPD/asthma
Patient safety
diagnostic error
health services research
comparative effectiveness

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
will need to undergo interview process with study team.

Students are expected to read and understand study protocol, participate in recruitment, data collection, and be included in all aspects of study implementation.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Nicole Jordan

Email Address: njordan@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: History
Office: 1005 UH M/C

Research Interest:
The First World War/ medical (epidemiology) and military history

May call at home: 630-393-3947

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Reading knowledge of German/ translation skills required.

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Laura Lee Junker

Email Address: ljunker@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Anthropology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 2152 BSB Phone: 996-3116
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/anth/faculty/junker.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
I am an archaeologist and ethnohistorian interested in the political economy of late first millennium to mid-second millennium A.D. maritime trading polities of island Southeast Asia, primarily the Philippines. I have carried out archaeological research in the Tanjay Region of the Philippines for two decades and in other regions of Southeast Asia, publishing on such topics as foreign trade, ritual feasting, specialized pottery production, forager-farmer interactions, and warfare.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Preference is for students who are sophomore and above, but I will consider freshmen. No background in archaeology is required, since students will be trained in lab methods, data entry, archival work, etc.
However, reading proficiency in Chinese or Spanish is particularly desired, and skills in illustration/drawing and statistical analysis are also highly valued (but not required).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student projects generally involve laboratory work in the Asian Archaeology Lab. Recent projects with students have included morphological and stylistic analysis of ancient ceramics to examine the trade origins of certain pieces, what ceramic forms can tell us about pottery use (i.e. household vs. ritual vs. feasting use), and the regional organization of ceramic production; studies of stone and metal tools to reconstruct warfare technology and tool manufacture; spatial analysis of ancient settlement patterns; and chemical analysis of soils. There are also possible projects using European and Chinese historical documents and a collection of 19th century photographs relevant to the nature of contact period Philippine societies.

Students may work on projects as little as 1 hour per week and I would be happy to arrange independent study or independent research credits commensurate with their hours of research participation and assistance.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Donald Jurivich

Email Address: jurivich@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Geriatric Medicine
Office: 4245 JBVAMC M/C 717 Phone: 5697322

Research Interest:
The Section of Geriatric Medicine has research interests in the

. Immunology of Aging
. Geriatric Health Care
. Autonomic nervous system aging

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Project : basic laboratory skills, junior or senior students only.

Project : familiarity with Microsoft
Access and Excel

Project : screen data bases

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Gregory Jursich

Email Address: jursich@uic.edu

Title: Research Professor
Office: 205 SEO, MC 063 Phone: 6-5946
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
My research interests involves deposition of thin films offering improved functionality in electronic components. In past years, research activities have been oriented towards atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal oxides pushing limits of scalability of fabrication to the nanometer scale. More recent direction of my research is in extending functionality of electronic circuits onto large scale flexible plastic substrates via printing novel composite materials with micron-level resolution to serve needs in bioengineering and mechanical engineering. Recent advances in printed electronics now permit incorporation of functionalized nanoparticles of precision metals, carbon nanotubes, and metal oxide-polymer composites offering wide range of advanced materials to further enhance functionality of printed circuits. Of particular interest is in the printing of strain sensors with integration of signal processing capabilities and semiconductor chip technology within printed circuitry.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Background courses in general chemistry (122 & 124) and general physics. Any prior electronics course most desirable.
Minimum GPA: 3.3
Preferred Major: Chemistry, Physics, Bioenegineering, or related.
Year in college: Sophomore or higher.
Priority given to those who commit to long stretches of time in the day.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Expect the student to be organized and reliable. Capable of analyzing scientific data quantitatively with statistical analysis, write reports of laboratory work, and search scientific literature.

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Robert Kaestner

Email Address: kaestner@uic.edu
Department: Institute of Government and Public Affairs
Office: 525 RB M/C 191 Phone: 9968227

Research Interest:
Health and Labor Policy

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Two or more courses in statistics; Interest in social (health and labor) policy; Interest in doing applied empirical research

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Ramaswamy Kalyanasundaram

Email Address: ramswamy@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biomedical Science
Title: Professor
Office: (815) 395-5696
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Chris Kanich

Email Address: ckanich@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1220 Phone: 312-355-0950
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/~ckanich/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Internet Security/cybersecurity, networking, systems, visualization, human factors in security/computer use, economics of cybercrime.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Requirements: Computer Networks or equivalent experience; Computer Science major, Junior or Senior level student. Students with exceptional interest and experience in data-driven visualizations or interactive experiences from Art & Design are also encouraged to apply. Web programming a plus. Minimum GPA of 3.5.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will meet with me before applying to discuss interests and possible projects. If we choose a project, the student will be expected commit at least 10, preferably 20 hours per week. The deliverable will either be running code or a scholarly paper, of which the student is the primary author.

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Thomas George Kannampallil

Email Address: tgk2@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Family Medicine
Title: Senior Research Specialist
Office: 1919 W Taylor, Room 142 Phone: 312.355.3452
Webpage: http://tgk2.people.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interests are on broadly on using computational and cognitive approaches for studying clinical work practices and activities. Specifically, my research has focused on information seeking at the point of care, communication and decision making during care transitions and RFID-based tracking of clinical activities.

My research is also situated on the developing novel algorithmic and statistical approaches that can provide new insights on clinical data (both patient and provider).

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
I am looking for students with a background in computer science, statistics or mathematics (or a related field). The following qualifications are preferred (not expected):

*Students should be self-motivated and driven to work with complex clinical data sets.

*Better than working knowledge of at least in at least one programming language

*Some (preliminary) statistical analysis skills

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Based on the specific skill sets, students will be assigned to a research project. The student will work closely under the guidance of researchers to organize and analyze multiple data sets. The students will meet with the researchers on a weekly basis. Depending on the success of the research projects, it is likely that the students will be included on research papers that are eventually written.

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Ronak Kapadia

Email Address: ronak@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Gender and Women's Studies
Secondary Department: Asian American Studies
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1218 University Hall, MC 360 Phone: 6-2715
Webpage: https://gws.uic.edu/people/gws-faculty/ronak-kapadia
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
I am interdisciplinary cultural theorist of race, sexuality, and empire in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century United States. Currently, I am completing my first book, Insurgent Aesthetics: Race, Security, and the Sensorial Life of Empire (Duke University Press, forthcoming), which is on contemporary South Asian, Muslim, and Arab American visual art in the context of war and empire. For this project, I seek a student researcher interested in critical ethnic and postcolonial studies, queer and feminist studies, and/or visual culture and performance studies.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
This position will be excellent preparation for a student who is considering applying for graduate work in the interdisciplinary humanities (American Studies, Ethnic Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, Cultural Studies, Art History, etc.). Preference will be given to students at the sophomore-level or above who can make a two semester commitment. Must have library research skills, some coursework in GWS or related programs, be able to work independently and have great attention to detail. Students interested in arts, social justice, and social movement work are especially encouraged to apply.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student researcher will be expected to help me compile extensive bibliographies, survey multiple bodies of interdisciplinary literature (both online and in library holdings), write brief summaries of new art exhibitions, and contact artists, archives, and galleries related to the book project. This is an exciting juncture for the project, and I look forward to working with a student researcher in 2017-18!

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Chisina Kapungu

Email Address: ckapungu@UIC.EDU
College: Medicine Department: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Title: Faith-based HIV Prevention with African American mothers and daughters
Office: 290 Phone: 3123551791
Webpage: http://www.ihrp.uic.edu/researcher/chisina-kapungu-phd
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interest is focused on the multi-systemic factors associated with sexual risk behaviors of African American girls and women. I am spearheading an academic-community partnership with churches to develop, implement and evaluate a faith-centered HIV prevention and health promotion program with African American girls and their mothers. My qualitative research explores the key elements for successful collaboration and implementation of faith-based HIV prevention interventions in churches.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA of 3.0; Preferred major in psychology, education, nursing, medicine or public health; Junior or senior preferred; Experience with conducting research with culturally diverse populations.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
There are a range of duties which the student can be involved in which include:1) administering structured interviews; 2) assisting with evaluation activities, including design and development of research instruments and training materials, data collection, data entry and data analysis; 3) conducting literature reviews; and 4) grant writing opportunities. The student will learn basic skills in using SPSS and have an opportunity to learn data analysis techniques. We are in the midst of completing a pilot of an HIV intervention and writing an R01 grant to determine the efficacy of the faith-centered HIV prevention and health promotion program. Therefore, the student will get a broad research experience.

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Eduard Karpov

Email Address: ekarpov@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Civil and Materials Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: ERF 3071 Phone: 312-413-8391
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/cme/people/faculty/ekarpov.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Nanomaterials, Surfaces and Interfaces;
Emerging Behavior in Material Systems;
Energy Harvesting and Conversion at the Nanometer Scale;
Computational Mechanics, Multiphysics Modeling Methods

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3-6

Qualifications of a Student:
We are looking for smart, flexible, committed students who want to learn about research in the area nanomaterials and applied mechanics. You need to be willing to commit to 3 to 6 hours per week of work in return for CME 392 or/and CME 496 credits.

To apply, you must have a strong GPA and you must have completed at least CME 203, CME 260 and CME 434. You must also be very reliable and committed to scholarship, and have good teamwork skills.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You would join an active laboratory with other undergraduate and graduate research assistants under my supervision. You’ll be expected to participate in various aspects of the work and to attend regular lab meetings. The work involves helping to conduct experimental sessions, preparing materials for the experiments, data entry, validation and analysis, literature search, numerical modeling and calculations using available computer codes. We will train you for all tasks.

This experience will allow you to understand basic aspects of materials engineering research, and help you decide whether you'd like to pursue it later in your career and graduate studies. You will learn many generalic skills and meet other researchers who can give you valuable advice.

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Jon Kassel

Email Address: jkassel@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Psychology
Title: Professor of Psychology
Office: 1018C BSB M/C 285 Phone: 4139162
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/psch/kassel1.html

Research Interest:
Substance abuse; Effects of drugs on mood and self-regulating processing. We typically run studies in which we administer drug (e.g., nicotine, alcohol, caffieine) to participants, and then assess drug effects on a host of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Psychology major; Completion of PSCH 100, 242, and 343; Skills in database management, statistics, and word processing useful. Minimum GPA of 3.0.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student responsibilities vary across studies, but here are some typical experience might expect: Actual running of participants through study; administering psychophysiological recording; data entry and data management; participant screening and scheduling; attend weekly lab meeting; and Ask questions! We view the undergraduates' participation in our lab as a chance to learn new things and grow. You may find that you are excited by research, or you might discover that this is not the direction for you (though most undergrad RAs have experienced the former!). Regardless, we aspire to provide you a memorable learning experience....

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Alisa Katzen

Email Address: katzen@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Office: 2370 MBRB M/C 669 Phone: 4139215

Research Interest:
Classical and molecular genetics with Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies); Molecular, cellular and developmental biology; Regulation of cell proliferation during organismal development

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Biology or biochemistry major; Some knowledge of genetics, cell and/or molecular biology preferred; Commitment to a minimum of two semesters

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Brian Kay

Email Address: bkay@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Professor, Head of the Department
Office: 4318 MBRB Phone: 312-355-0189
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/kaylab/BK_index.html
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Please see website link

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
minimum GPA 3.5
Prerequisite courses: BIOS220, 222

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be expected to work at least 3 days a week, two of which should be consecutive. The student will initially start helping with research project of student mentor with the ultimate goal of working independently. Student should make a schedule with the mentor and be punctual. Must be enthusiastic about the project and be willing to read up on relevant background material. Student will be expected to help with general lab maintenance duties along with performing common lab tasks like making reagents, pouring plates etc.

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Ralph Keen

Email Address: rkeen01@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: History
Title: Prof.
Office: 925 UH
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
History of religious thought from the Reformation to the present, with specialization in the early-modern period (1500-1700).
History of education in Europe, from Renaissance to the beginning of the 20th century.
Catholicism from the late middle ages to the 19th century.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in the history of ideas and aptitude with online bibliographical sources (digitized journals and text collections).

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Either: Help in revising a textbook in Christian history: finding sources, verifying facts, etc.
Or: collecting materials for a new book project on Erasmus (finding literature, reading and abstracting articles and book reviews, etc.)

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Timothy Keiderling

Email Address: tak@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Office: 5407B SES M/C 111 Phone: 9963156
Webpage: http://www.chem.uic.edu/FACULTY/Keiderling/FACULTY.HTM

Research Interest:
Protein and peptide structure and folding studied by spectroscopy

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in questions of biopolymer structure; Credit or concurrent registration in at least one relevant course, such as:
biochemistry, instrumental chemistry, or physical chemistry

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Fabien P H Kenig

Email Address: fkenig@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Earth and Environmental Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 2448 SES M/C 186 Phone: 7085435059
Webpage: http://www.kenig-ogl.org/fabien-kenig.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Astrobiology, Biogeochemistry, Organic Geochemistry, Paleooceanography, Environmental Forensics.

Life in extreme environments and planetary analogues (Antarctica), Identification of organic biosignatures in deep time Earth sediments and on other planets.

Study of the contribution of mobile source pollutants to the urban environment.

Application of new molecular mapping technology to deep time Earth and extraterrestrial samples.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA 2.9/4.0
Preferred majors: Earth and Environmental Sciences or Chemistry
Juniors or Seniors preferred

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The Student is expected to gain rapid independence under the supervision of the faculty and advanced graduate students in order to perform research producing the preliminary data necessary for application to external funding sources.
The student would work in an organic geochemistry laboratory environment, performing experiments. The student must respect all safety requirements.
The student will use mass spectrometers independently, after training.
The student is expected to produce an experiment report and to present his work in a poster at the UIC Research Forum.

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Linda Kenney

Email Address: kenneyl@Uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Microbiology and Immunology
Office: 719 MSB M/C Phone: 4130576

Research Interest:
Our laboratory is interested in regulation of gene expression. In particular, we study how OmpR regulates genes that are required for virulence in Salmonella typhimurium, which causes gastroenteritis in humans

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry would be helpful; Experience with molecular biology would also be useful.

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Robert Kenyon

Email Address: kenyon@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
Office: 1133 SEO M/C 152 Phone: 9960450
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/kenyon
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Human Vision;
Computer graphics;
Flight simulation;
Signal processing;
Man-machine interfaces;
Vision-motor control in humans,
Virtual reality research: human navigation and way-finding, human performance in unusual environments.

human perception of speed.
manual control in humans.
adaption in visual motor function due to environments.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Electrical Engineering,
computer science,
Computer Engineering,
Bioengineering major; Junior or senior standing.
minimum GPA 3.0.
honors college student preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
to perform literature search.
aid graduate student in experiments.
interface computers with lab equipment.
run analysis programs on data.
write programs for experiments: both running experiment and analysis of data.

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Wai-Yee Keung

Email Address: keung@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Physics
Title: Professor, Emeritus
Office: SES 2252 Phone: 312 413 2778
Webpage: http://keung.people.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
High Energy Theoretical Physics

Quantum Physics

Theoretical studies on Dark Matter and its interaction

Matter-anti-Matter asymmetry (CP violation)

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
minimum gpa: 3.0
prerequisite: Modern Physics Course work, B or better, advanced calculus, skills in numerical programing

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Numerical Simulation on physics problem and understanding the underlying principles of dynamics.

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Fatemeh Khalili Araghi

Email Address: akhalili@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Physics
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: SES 2146 Phone: (312) 355-33
Webpage: http://www.ks.uiuc.edu/~akhalili/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Computer modeling of paracellular transport pathways

We are using molecular dynamics simulations to study ion conduction across paracellular transport pathways. Using all-atom simulations, we will study the dynamics of membrane proteins that form tight junction strands between two neighboring cells, and will study permeation of ions and small molecules across these proteins. The simulations allow us to quantify the paracellular current and will identify ion binding sites across the pathways, which in turn might lead to the design of new therapeutic compounds for blocking the pathway. Modulation of the paracellular current is significantly important in treatment of diarrhea and neurological diseases.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of Linux operating system

Bioengineering, Physics, Chemistry students are encouraged to apply.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will carry out molecular dynamics simulations of tight junctions strands. The student will work closely with experimentalist to identify structural components of tight junctions that can result in identification of new therapeutic compounds that can module permeation of ions across tight junctions in intestines, kidney and the blood-brain barrier. The results will contribute to a joint paper with our experimental collaborators.

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Manorama Mocherla Khare

Email Address: mkhare1@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Family Medicine
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: College of Medicine at Rockford Phone: 815-395-5762
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research focuses on planning, implementation and evaluation of programs related to women's health. I have just received a grant to evaluate the IL WISEWOMAN program, which uses an evidence based lifestyle behavior change intervention to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in adult women enrolled in the Illinois Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Program (IBCCP). The program is being implemented by the Illinois Department of Public Health - Office of Women's Health in collaboration with several IBCCP provider sites across the state. The focus of the intervention is to provide women knowledge and skills to increase physical activity and improve eating behaviors. This is a 4 year multi-site study and students can be involved in the planning, implementation and evaluation.

Additionally, I am interested in studying the use of mHealth technology in health promotion.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5 - 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Able to work independently; good attention to detail; reliable, responsible, interested in women's health research.

Junior standing or above. Students majoring in: Social Science/Applied Health Science/Gender and Womens Studies/Pre-med,Pre-nursing, Pre-pharmacy preferred. Honors college students preferred. Coursework in research methods a plus.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will assist with planning and implementation of the WISEWOMAN program. Will assist with all aspects of research design and evaluation, data collection and data entry, and other project related tasks.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Mary A Khetani

Email Address: mkhetani@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Occupational Therapy
Title: Assistant Professor (effective 9/1/15)
Office: 3rd Floor
Webpage: http://www.cperl.colostate.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Childhood disability, participation and quality of life, survey development, leveraging technology to help families engage in service provision

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
3.5 or higher, junior or senior, interest in childhood disability or pursuing a health related career.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I need help in analyzing interview data from caregivers of infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities (e.g., Down Syndrome), results of which will inform the design of a web-based planning guide for use by parents.

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Lech Kiedrowski

Email Address: lkiedr@psych.uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Office: 336W PI M/C 913 Phone: 4134559
Webpage: http://www.psych.uic.edu/faculty/kiedrowski.htm

Research Interest:
Mechanism of neuronal death; Development of strategies to diminish neuronal death following brain ischemia; Impact of destabilization of Na+ and K+ homeostasis on Ca+ flues across the plasma membrane, on mitochondrial Ca+ load, and on mitochondrial function

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Background knowledge in biochemistry, chemistry, and/or biology

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John Kiefer

Email Address: kiefer@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Office: 206 CEB M/C 110 Phone: 9965711
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/chme/prof/kiefer.htm

Research Interest:
Combustion, Pollutant Formation; Chemical kinetics and thermodynamics; Reactions of halocarbons and hydrocarbons
Theory of chemical reaction kinetics

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Chemical engineering or chemistry major; Senior standing

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Jane Jinmyung Kim

Email Address: jkim340@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Title: Postdoctoral Research Associate

Webpage: http://bcmg.com.uic.edu/faculty/segev_nava.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
We study the regulation of intracellular transport of proteins in yeast, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae in the laboratory of Dr. Nava Segev.

Common approaches/techniques: Cell Biology, Molecular biology, Genetics, Microscopy, Yeast Biology, PCR, Western blotting, Molecular cloning.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Biological Sciences major who has taken or is planning to take genetics and cell biology.

This opportunity will be limited to first or second year students with the anticipation that it will be a 3-4 year commitment.

We will only accept students qualified for Federal Work Study.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We would like a student employee to work on lab duties with federal work study funding during their freshman and sophomore years. These duties include washing glassware, using the autoclave, preparation of media, etc.

At any time, we invite the student to join projects and perform experiments to be used in their Capstone research, or to gain research experience for future endeavors. This additional training is solely based on the interest and time-commitment shown by the student.

This opportunity will be limited to first or second year students with the anticipation that it will be a 3-4 year commitment.

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Ji Yeon Kim

Email Address: jiyeonk@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1262 Phone: 69545
Webpage: www.thekimlab.org
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Understanding how metabolism is altered during tumorigenesis and metastasis is believed to be of significant translational potential. Metabolic reprogramming often increases the survival and proliferation of cancer cells, but can also introduce new targetable liabilities to these cells. The study of cancer metabolism has largely focused on central carbon metabolism, such as glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle. However, little attention has been given to investigating the functional roles of nitrogen metabolism in cancer biology. The overarching goal in my lab is to study the fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying cancer metabolism, with a specific focus on nitrogen metabolism, and to identify metabolic liabilities that can be targeted therapeutically.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
preferred major: biology-related
students with lab experiences are preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Time commitment:
We are expecting students to commit to working in the lab ~10 hours per week and to be able to be in the lab for periods of 3 to 5 hours per day or at least two consecutive days.

Classroom is the priority for a student. But we expect students to be at work on time and to devote work time to work tasks.

Sophomores: We are looking for students who are willing to commit to working in the lab for 2+ years, pending an initial evaluation period.

Juniors need prior research experience in specific research areas (e.g. standard molecular biology techniques like PCR, rtPCR, cell culture work, or working with mice).

* Training plan:
Initially, you will learn basic lab techniques and assist with routine maintenance of the lab. You will then choose a specific project to work on that is appropriate for your time commitment, skill set, and research interest.


The student is expected to attend the weekly research meetings, participate in journal club, and gain the necessary skills to significantly contribute to at least one mini project. Students unable to maintain a weekly commitment will not be considered for renewed participation in subsequent years.

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Sangil Kim

Email Address: sikim@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 213CEB Phone: 312-355-5149
Webpage: http://polydream.wixsite.com/nanofluidics
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
• Understanding ion transport mechanisms in highly charged nanopores for the application of energy storage, production and conversion

• Nanocomposite membranes development for energy conversion

• Flue temperature CO2 separation membranes

• High-performance lithium sulfur battery cathode based on controlled micropore nanostructures

• High efficiency 3D nanostructured radiation detectors

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:

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Rhonda Kineman

Email Address: kineman@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Endocrinology
Office: 6271 JBVAMC M/C Phone: 5696977
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/com/dom/endo/staff_sites/rhonda-rea.htm

Research Interest:
Use of transgenic and knockout mouse models to study study metabolic regulation of pituitary function, specifically as it relates to growth hormone synthesis and release

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Basic knowledge in physiology; Enthusiasm and curiosity

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Spyridon Kitsiou

Email Address: skitsiou@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Biomed and Health Info Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 205 Phone: 312-355-3519
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research interests focus on the development, testing, and comparative evaluation of mobile health technologies (e.g. mobile apps and wearable sensor devices) for self-management of chronic diseases and other conditions (e.g. cardiovascular disease and diabetes).

Mobile health technologies (mHealth) such as smartphones, mobile applications (apps), and wearable activity tracking devices that permit real-time collection of large amounts of data have become ubiquitous, offering significant and innovative opportunities to researchers and clinicians. New wearable devices such as Fitbits allow users to collect objective measures of their own daily activities and obtain more detailed feedback on their performance. In addition to self-monitoring, these devices support the exchange of information between consumers and health providers, enabling remote monitoring and assessment of multiple activity behaviors in various contexts and thus development of more dynamic and personalized interventions to support behavior change. However, the effectiveness of these mHealth technologies has not been thoroughly investigated in the management of chronic diseases.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
I am currently interested in working with students who have programming skills and/or are majoring in the health sciences.

Majors of Interest include: Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Health Information Management, Nursing, Pre-Med, or other Health Science related fields.

GPA 3.0 or above. Familiarity with, or friendly attitude toward, computers, ability to work as an independent, yet interactive member of a team.

Ability to think analytically and creatively. The student must me highly motivated; willing to learn new methods and techniques to address interdisciplinary research questions and problems; willing to undergo Human Subject and HIPAA Training; willing to assist with patient recruitment, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of findings.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will become familiar with the techniques and data collection methods used at the mHealth Innovation Laboratory, execute a hypothesis-driven investigation and present the results at the UIC Research Symposium in the spring.

Students with programming skills are expected to contribute to the development and refinement of mobile health apps for the purposes of the research projects conducted at the mHealth Innovation Lab.

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Jonathan D Klein

Email Address: jonklein@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pediatrics
Secondary Department: Institute of Health Research and Policy
Title: Professor and Senior Associate Head
Office: 1406 CRB Phone: 312-996-7416
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Adolescent preventive health care
Tobacco control and child and adolescent health
Global health and non-communicable diseases
Community-based youth development program evaluation

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: open

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior undergraduates considered for research project staff and/or independent study. Medical and public health or comparable social science or policy graduate students or comparable experience and interest strongly preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
This will depend on the interest and fit with existing projects.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Cynthia Lee Klein-Banai

Email Address: cindy@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Title: Associate Chancellor for Sustainability
Office: Sustainability 150 PSB Phone: 312-996-3968
Webpage: http://sustainability.uic.edu
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
1. I conduct applied research in energy and greenhouse gas emissions as they relate to colleges and universities. We collect institutional data and report on energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions. We also utilize campus recycling data to study recycling behavior and program performance.

2. We also use a community assets-based approach to engage communities in sustainable practice. We relate environmental practices to social justice, health & wellness, education & outreach, campus systems, and structures. This is a unique approach to understanding the culture of sustainability within an institution or community and engaging people in sustainable practices. This research will enhance UIC's own sustainability programs and goals.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
-Sophomore level or higher, with gpa of 3.00 or higher
-Any major but most suited to students studying or interested in anthropology, sociology, public health, urban planning, environmental science, communication and creative arts (writing, video, drawing, etc), engineering, or natural sciences
-Strong communication skills,
-Familiarity with Excel, preferred
-Strong interest in sustainability, social justice or community health
-Ability to work independently and with a partner under minimal supervision

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Depending on the project:
Waste, Energy & Greenhouse Gases
1. Collecting institutional data, entering into Excel files, calculators and Energy Star Portfolio Manager
2. Preparing progress reports, charts, and tables
3. Possibly collecting field data through audits of campus facilities
4. Conducting surveys

Engaging Communities in Sustainable Practices
1. Conducting interviews with community members
2. Developing outreach programs that build on work community is doing to engage in sustainable practices
3. Developing tools to engage in sustainable practices

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Robert Klie

Email Address: rfklie@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Physics
Title: Associate Professor
Office: SES2473 Phone: x6-6064
Webpage: http://nspg.phy.uic.edu
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Condensed Matter Physics, Transmission Electron Microscopy.


My research interests focus on the study of complex materials used in alternative energy production. More specifically, I want to understand how the atomic structure of a material, or imperfections within the crystal lattice, influence the material's overall performance.

To perform this research, I use Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEM) which are located in the Research Resources Center. Currently, we are in the process of acquiring the highest-resolution TEM in the US, which will enable us to look at individual atoms within the larger lattice of many complex materials.

In particular, I am interested in four different kind of alternative energy materials: 1) solar-cells; 2) thermo-electric materials; 3) heterogeneous catalysts; and 4) superconductors. All of these materials are synthesized by my collaborators and need to be prepared for investigation in a state-of-the-art TEM. This preparation involves cutting using diamond saw, mechanical polishing, dimpling and ion-beam thinning.

Once the samples are thin enough to be looked at in a TEM, we will try to correlate the material's performance with its atomic structure, and develop model of how to further improve its efficiency.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6-9

Qualifications of a Student:
I am looking for dedicated and smart physics or engineering majors who want to learn about state-of-the-art characterization of materials used in alternative energy applications. You need to be willing to commit to 6 to 9 hours per week of work in return for 2 or 3 credits of PHYS 392 credit.

To apply, you must have a strong GPA and you must have completed at least PHYS 141 and PHYS 142. You must also be very reliable, and have a steady hand to handle fragile and sensitive materials.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You would join the Nanoscale Physics Group in the Physics Department, and work together with 2 undergraduate and 5 graduate students under my supervision. You will prepare materials for investigation in a transmission electron microscope, and assist the graduate students with the acquisition of data.You will be trained for all these tasks.

This experience will allow you to understand what research in condensed-matter physics is all about, and help you decide whether you might like to pursue it later in your career. If you like research but decide to pursue a career in industry, it worth pointing out that TEMs are now used in nearly every aspect of the new green-energy economy. As part of this project, you will learn many valuable skills that you can use in your future work in graduate school or industry.

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Donald H Kluemper

Email Address: kluemper@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Managerial Studies
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 2204 University Hall Phone: 225-362-2858
Webpage: http://business.uic.edu/recruiterscompanies/ilead
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Workplace mistreatment
Leadership
Personality

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Detail orientation
Interested in learning about research

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be responsible working on various research projects and in collaboration with doctoral students in Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management. Responsibilities may include data entry, data analysis, literature reviews, field data collection, running laboratory studies, and other research-oriented tasks associated with the social sciences.

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Nebojsa Knezevic

Email Address: nebojsa@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anesthesiology
Secondary Department: Surgery
Title: Clinical Associate Professor
Office: AIMMC Phone: 773-296-5619
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Clinical research
Chronic pain
Acute postoperative pain
Pharmacogenomics in chronic pain patients

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Timothy Koh

Email Address: tjkoh@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Kinesiology and Nutrition
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 529 AHS Phone: 312-413-9771
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research focus is tissue inflammation and repair. His research group investigates the mechanisms underlying impaired tissue repair and regeneration, such as that associated with diabetes and aging. My research approach integrates in vivo and in vitro models as well as techniques from physiology, engineering, and cell and molecular biology. This approach is vital to understanding the roles of specific cells and proteins in tissue healing. The long-term goal of this research is to elucidate new strategies for improving tissue repair after injury induced by exercise, trauma or surgery.

The most common treatments for soft-tissue injuries involve anti-inflammatory drugs and modalities. However, recent studies have demonstrated that components of the inflammatory response are required for efficient tissue healing and remodeling. My research is focused on the role of the inflammatory process in injury and repair of skeletal muscle and skin. There are currently two main projects being performed in my laboratory. First, we are performing experiments to understand the critical role of an extracellular protease called the urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the regulation of muscle inflammation and repair. Second, we are studying the role of macrophage plasticity in skin and muscle repair.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Students with a strong background in biology and prior experience in a laboratory setting are preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
1. Attendance - student must show up for agreed-upon periods.
2. Work performance - student must complete assigned work in a diligent and timely manner.
3. Curiosity - student should demonstrate intellectual curiosity in his/her project area.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Yulia Komarova

Email Address: ykomarov@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pharmacology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 4053 COMRB Phone: 312-996-1332
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcph/falc_komarova.htm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The endothelium functions as a semi-permeable barrier between the blood plasma and interstitium thus regulating tissue fluid homeostasis. Impairment of the endothelial barrier is a key early event in the development of Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). This condition is clinically manifested as a severe loss of gas exchange capacity and hypoxemia that is often fatal.

The focus of my research is on the cross-talk between microtubule cytoskeleton and VE-cadherin-mediated adhesions in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Dynamic interaction between cytoskeleton and adherens junctions is known to be important for maintenance of basal endothelial barrier permeability and underlies changes in endothelial permeability in response to different mediators. I am investigating the molecular and signaling mechanisms regulating microtubule cytoskeleton downstream of adherens junction and how changes in microtubule dynamics affect integrity of endothelial monolayer in response to extracellular stimuli. By establishing how MTs mediate increased lung vascular permeability we will be in a position to define novel therapeutic targets to treat ARDS.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
Students will be considered on an individual basis but it is preferred that they have a 3.0 GPA or above. Prior work and academic experience in cell biology, biochemistry, pharmacology and/or bio-engineering would also be helpful.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student is expected to conduct semi-independent research project under supervision in the area of lung inflammation and injury.

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Petia A. Kostadinova

Email Address: pkostad@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Political Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: BSB 1118 Phone: 312-413-2187
Webpage: http://pols.las.uic.edu/political-science/people/faculty/pkostadinova
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am working on a project of local democracy in the post-communist countries, focusing on Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Slovakia.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5 or more

Qualifications of a Student:
Min GPA 3.5 preferred, although I will consider students with GPA above 3.0. Native language skills in Bulgarian, Czech, Hungarian or Slovak - a priority but other students will also be considered. Social science majors preferred but language abilities take a priority.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Research assistants will help identify local politicians in these countries; and help create a survey of their political motivations and autonomy.

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Tohru Kozasa

Email Address: tkozas@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pharmacology
Office: E412 MSB M/C 868 Phone: 4130111

Research Interest:
Biochemical investigations on G protein mediated signal transduction pathways

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Petr Kral

Email Address: pkral@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 4238 Phone: 312-996-6318
Webpage: http://www.chem.uic.edu/pkral/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Nanoscience from a molecular point of view, including materials, fluid flow, biology, pharmacy, etc. Discover through molecular modelling the unknown science while you are an undergraduate student. Our undergraduate students publish papers in prestigious journals, receive fellowships, and gain excellent jobs.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: ~ 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Ability to work with computers (potentially linux), any math, physics, chemistry, and biology knowledge is welcome.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Perform molecular dynamics simulations of nanoscale systems with commercial codes.

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Maria Krysan

Email Address: krysan@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Sociology
Title: Professor
Office: 4112E Phone: 996 5575
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Maria Krysan (Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1995), a Professor in the Department of Sociology and the Institute of Government and Public Affairs, focuses her research on racial residential segregation and racial attitudes. Her investigations of these substantive issues often connect to methodological questions about how to study this sensitive area of social life. She combines standard closed-ended survey analysis with mode of administration experiments, analyses of open-ended survey questions, focus groups, and in-depth interviews. She is co-author (with H. Schuman, L. Bobo and C. Steeh) of the book Racial Attitudes in American: Trends and Interpretations (Harvard University Press, Revised Edition, 1997), and is responsible for a website that updates the data from that book (http://www.igpa.uillinois.edu/programs/racialAttitudes/).

Maria Krysan is also the Director of the Chicago Area Study (http://igpa.uillinois.edu/cas/), a funding and training opportunity for UIC graduate students and faculty members that provides cutting-edge, original social science research about the Chicago area to scholars, community-based practitioners, and public policy analysts.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Most important to me is a student who is excited about learning about research, and is interested in getting hands-on experience on a research project related to issues of race, residential segregation, and racial attitudes.

It would be desirable, but not required, if the student had taken a social science research methods course; and/or was a sociology or other social sciences major; and/or was a junior or senior.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I have several research projects related to the topic of racial residential segregation and housing issues in the city of Chicago. In particular for this position (Fall 2013 with the possibility of also extending into Spring 2014) I am looking for a student who would like to be involved in a community-based study of housing issues in Chicago. The student would be expected to work with a small research team (which includes a community partner, as well as a graduate student RA) that is collecting data (through focus groups, in-depth interviews, and a community assessment) that will inform a proposed housing strategy for a Chicago neighborhood. Experience in conducting this kind of research is not required; a strong desire to learn how to do this kind of research, and to pitch in and help complete the tasks, is required.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Shafi M Kuchay

Email Address: kuchay@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: MBRB, #1252 Phone: 312-355-3949
Webpage: https://bcmg.com.uic.edu/faculty/kuchay_shafi.html
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Understanding the relevance of protein degradation by ubiquitin ligases in cancer and other disorders.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: negotiable

Qualifications of a Student:
Biosciences and Engineering major preferred.
Students at every level are welcome.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student(s) is expected to actively participate in conducting experiments routinely performed in the laboratory. The student has opportunity to learn and gain experience in gene editing, biochemical and molecular biology techniques and cell based assays.

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Kevin Kumashiro

Email Address: kevink@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Institute for Research On Race and Public Policy
Secondary Department: Educational Policy Studies
Title: Professor of Asian American Studies and Education
Phone: 6-8530
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/las/asam/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Anti-oppressive education; teacher education and social justice activism; Asian American genders and sexualities

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Assist in various research projects related to education, Asian American Studies, social justice, and activism.

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Alex Kurczaba

Email Address: kurczaba@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Slavic and Baltic Languages and Literatures
Title: Director of Undergraduate Studies
Office: 1614 UH M/C 306 Phone: 4133059
Webpage: http://tigger.uic.edu/~kurczaba/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Western culture and civilization, History of Ideas, Polish, Russian, German literatures, Joseph Conrad, Film.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Computer skills; fluency in Polish and English.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Assistance in implementing software programs.

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Mary Jo LaDu

Email Address: mladu@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: COMRB 7091 Phone: 312-355-4795
Webpage: ladu.lab.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Neurobiology, Neurodegeneration, Alzheimer's disease.

Since moving our lab here in 2005, 54 students have completed their honor's projects in our lab and graduated, and since 2018, our lab has received 19 Honor’s College research grants and 21 Chancellor’s Undergraduate Research Awards. Currently, we have 18 undergrads at various stages of their degree working in the lab. Simply stated, we could not function without them.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a rapidly growing epidemic, particularly in the United States as the "baby boomers" reach the age of onset for AD. Advancing our understanding of disease onset and progression, as well as the best pathways to intervene for its prevention and treatment, is critical to overcoming this growing health care burden. Currently, there is no cure for AD.

Genetic mutations that result in the over-production of amyloid-beta peptide (AB) cause the familial form of AD. Increasing evidence suggests that the accumulation of AB in neurons may be a critical, initial step in a cascade that results in neuronal death. In 1993, it was found that individuals possessing a certain naturally occurring form of apolipoprotein E (apoE) called apoE4 have a greater risk for developing AD than individuals possessing the apoE2 or apoE3 form of the protein. For over 20 years, our lab has focused on understanding the structural and functional interactions between apoE and AB, particularly the effects on the health of neurons. While it is well established that apoE associates with AB plaques, the effect of apoE on the small, soluble oligomeric form of the peptide (oAB) is currently being investigated.

To study these effects, we have developed a novel transgenic mouse model that mimics the genetics and pathology of human disease by expressing both human AB and human APOE genotypes. This allows for the study of therapeutic strategies, currently focusing on understanding and targeting the interaction between AB and the different, naturally occurring APOE genotypes. In addition, recent re-interpretation of decades of human studies suggests that the risk imparted by APOE4 is actually specific only to females, introducing an important new component to the mechanistic hypothesis. Combined with discovery of several key potential AD biomarkers, development of these mice is enabling the investigation of multiple pharmaceutical interventions in Alzheimer’s disease.

In summary, we are working to elucidate the biochemistry of Alzheimer’s disease. We have developed an antibody and series of tests that allow the identification of the toxic oAB, believed to be one key to the changes in the brain seen PRIOR to the cognitive loss that is characteristic of Alzheimer’s patients. With these developed tests and a new, fully-humanized transgenic mouse model, we have established biomarkers and an animal model that track progression of the disease and could revolutionize the development of candidate drugs to prevent or treat the disease in its earliest phases.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12-15

Qualifications of a Student:
In reference to above, a minimum 12-15 hrs/wk with 3-5 hour chunks of time required. We are here Saturdays for a mandatory undergraduate journal club, very early mornings doing mouse behavior studies and evenings as some protocols require long days or 2 shifts of investigators. Students that are motivated and have experience in our lab are eligible and encouraged to work full or half time during the summers and school year as hourly paid employees.

Successful candidates will enhance their experience by immersing themselves in the scientific background/literature relevant to the lab’s research (described above). Our preference is for freshman and sophomore (explanation below) and work-study students. No experience is necessary; only a commitment to scientific research and a strong willingness to learn. A successful candidate will follow directions precisely, pay close attention to details, and be adaptable to changing lab needs.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Expectations of All Lab Members

Our general goal is a productive, professional, and harmonious work environment.
The following expectations apply to employees in our lab, as appropriate to one's position (manager, research scientists, post-docs, graduate students, undergraduate summer fellows, graduate rotation students, and work-study undergraduates):

1. Share your skills, talents and creativity with the lab. Conversely, take advantage of educational and growth opportunities available.
a. Make practical use of classroom knowledge by integrating it into research in the laboratory.
b. A commitment to learning both correct lab technique and the biology and pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) is expected, as appropriate to one's position in the lab.
c. Attendance at weekly journal club with Dr. LaDu and postdocs is required to learn, discuss and critically evaluate recent findings in AD research.
d. Learning can be facilitated by scientific interactions with other lab members, active participation in lab meetings, attendance at research conferences, and guided reading of AD literature.
e. Work together in problem solving. Use a pro-active approach to your work, the work of others and the overall focus of the lab. A pro-active approach includes both anticipating and avoiding potential problems in experimental design through careful planning, as well as timely corrective action when an experiment fails.

2. At least once per semester, meet with Dr. LaDu for a performance review/evaluation.

3. While classroom work is the priority:
a. Schedule time-off around exams or vacations as far in advance as possible
b. Be at work promptly when scheduled or send an email that you will be late or unable to come.
c. Please send an email if you are sick.
d. Devote work time to work tasks and personal time to personal matters.

4. For undergrads in particular, we look for:
a. Students who demonstrate an eagerness to learn the scientific basis of the lab’s past, current and future research direction(s).
b. Freshman or sophomore students who, if happy, are willing to work during subsequent school years, culminating in an Honor’s project. Full-time summer employment is also possible. Junior and senior students need specific research experience.
c. Students who understand that research lab work skills must be developed over time. Initially, you will learn basic lab techniques and assist with routine maintenance of the lab. You will then choose a senior lab member and work on their project to develop specific techniques. Finally, you will identify a project that is appropriate for your time commitment and skill-set.

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Melissa Lamar

Email Address: mlamar@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Department of Medicine
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: IMHR
Webpage: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=GtRxD6wAAAAJ&hl=en
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
aging, cognitive impairment, cardiovascular disease, neuroimaging, minority health disparities, intervention studies

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
Preference for students who have completed courses in statistics and psychology and/or neuroscience. We prefer a 2-year commitment because of the effort required to train individuals in our research methods.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will assist with patient recruitment, screening and neuropsychological testing as well as facilitate the MRI visit. Data scoring and entry is also involved.

There is opportunity for the student to lead their own study in the second year under mentorship for poster presentations and/or publications as appropriate.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




John Larson

Email Address: jrlarson@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Secondary Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Associate Professor of Physiology in Psychiatry
Office: 529 SPHPI M/C 912 Phone: 4134572
Webpage: http://www.psych.uic.edu/faculty/larson.htm
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Brain mechanisms for learning and memory; mental retardation, aging, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia; olfaction (the sense of smell)

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Kimberly A Lawless

Email Address: klawless@uic.edu
College: Education Department: Educational Psychology
Title: Associate Dean for Research
Office: 3123 Phone: 6-2359
Webpage: http://globaled2.com
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research examines interdisciplinary learning environments for k-12 students that involve the use of technology to connect students at disparate locations. I study how such learning environments impact the student learning outcomes and teacher instructional approaches utilized within the classroom. These designs are typically problem-based in orientation. My intent is to identify and study new approach to engage students in meaningful ways with important habits of mind within the disciplines of science, social studies and language arts. Please see our website, GlobalEd2.com, for a glimpse at the current curriculum that I am investigating.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Student should hold a GPA of a B or better and be facile with technology - though no programming skills are necessary.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will have the opportunity to observe the curriculum and help GE2 staff collect and analyze student and teacher data related to its impact in the classroom.

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Orly Lazarov

Email Address: olazarov@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: COMRB 909 S Wolcott Phone: 312-355-0548
Webpage: http://lazarovlab.anat.uic.edu/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
neural stem cell biology and therapy
aging
neurodegenerative disease
stroke
cognitive function and molecular mechanisms of cognition

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
necessary courses: neuroscience, biochemistry, molecular biology
lab experience is an advantage

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
To perform research at the lab, understand experimental plan, handle basic research technique, produce presentable data.

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Sonya J. Leathers

Email Address: sonyal@uic.edu
College: Social Work Department: Social Work
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4323 EPASW M/C Phone: 9968512
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Students have the opportunity to work on one of two studies focused on (1) understanding the needs of children and adolescents who live in foster care and (2) developing more effective services to improve their mental health and strengthen connections to supportive adults. One study is studying supported mentoring and job skills training for older youth in care in an experimental design. The second study seeks to understand foster parents' perspectives regarding the reasons for children's placement instability and factors that support stability for children at high risk.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
An interest in child mental health, foster care, social work and/or psychology. Coursework including introductory or developmental psychology, social work practice, statistics, and psychopathology helpful but not required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
General research tasks including assisting with interviews and data entry. Completion of IRB training required. Helpful if able to attend project meetings on Monday mornings, although this is not required.

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Guy LeBreton

Email Address: gcl@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pharmacology
Office: 768 CME M/C 868 Phone: 9964929

Research Interest:
The study of Human blood platelet signal transduction pathways using a wide range of chemical, biochemical, immunological, pharmacological and molecular biology techniques

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Hyunwoo Lee

Email Address: hlee31@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Biopharmaceutical Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: MBRB #3020 Phone: 996-3371
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My laboratory studies bacterial physiology related to bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. In our study, we use several model bacteria including Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Bacillus anthracis. Our current research is focused on identification and characterization of molecular mechanisms, used by bacterial pathogens to survive killing by host antibacterial molecules and to proliferate in nutrient-limited host environments.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15 hours

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior and Senior biology major students are preferred.

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Lisa Yun Lee

Email Address: lisalee@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Art History
Secondary Department: Gender and Women's Studies
Title: Director, Associate Professor
Office: Jefferson 106 Phone: 312 413 5358
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Socially engaged art
Radically democratic museum practices
Public Art and community engagement

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Student must be interested in social justice, culture, and socially engaged art. Good research and writing skills and an interest in reaching out to diverse communities are also important.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I will be Presidential Fellow next year charged with invigorating our campus culture with arts and cultural projects at both UIC and UIUC. Working with partners at UIUC, we will develop public programming and engaged art projects for UIC students and community members. I am hoping to find a curious, socially engaged student can help with community engagement, conducting research about artists and community groups.

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Michelle Lee

Email Address: mkim207@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Department of Medicine
Secondary Department: Division of Infectious Diseases; Department of Medicine
Title: Grants and Contracts manager
Office: 808 S. Wood St. Phone: 413-9794
Webpage: https://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/departments/academic-departments/medicine/infectious-diseases/research/project-wish/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Clinical trial research for the HIV prevention and treatment

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15-20

Qualifications of a Student:

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
-Front desk coverage
-answer phone calls
-assist research staff
-clerical duties

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Yannek Leiderman, MD, PhD

Email Address: yannek@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
Secondary Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
Office: 312-413-8000
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/com/eye/Department/FullTimeFaculty/Leiderman_Yannek.shtml
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
I serve as a clinician and surgeon on the Retina Service, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. As the Director of the Vitreoretinal Microsurgery Laboratory here at UIC, I coordinate a team of clinicians and researchers in the investigation of disorders of the retina and vitreous, the structures within the eye that mediate light transduction and visual perception.

My laboratory is focused on Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy (PVR), a cicatricial ('scar tissue') process affecting the retina, especially common after eye injury affecting the internal and posterior structures of the eye, as well as a subset of retinal detachment. We study the causes and molecular mechanisms of PVR, with the ultimate goal of translational success - applying findings about how a disease process occurs to the design of a preventative strategy or treatment.

We utilize various methods of laboratory and clinical science, including biomedical bench science with cells and tissues, animal modeling, microsurgical technique, analysis of human tissue samples, and chemical engineering.

At present there are opportunities in several areas within our group. 1) Participation in laboratory investigation of PVR. 2) Investigation of novel vitreous substitutes (the vitreous is the clear, gel-like tissues that fills the eye. It is often removed during surgery, and replacement offers an opportunity for drug-delivery). 3) Information technology. Design and implementation of web-based instruments for the collection of clinical data, as well as the design of a laboratory web page.

Participation in our laboratory research program will be particularly useful for students planning a career in biomedical research, medicine, bio- and chemical engineering, or health information technology.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: None

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum qualifications will be determined by the student's goals and interests. See above for potential project areas.
1) Laboratory Investigation - Strong academic preparation including major in the chemical/physical/biological sciences. Some experience in relevant laboratory techniques preferred.
2) Drug Delivery / Novel Vitreous Substitutes - Preferred major in chemical engineering or bioengineering.
3) Information Technology - Experience in web page design, and the design and implementation of web-based survey-type instruments for the collection of data.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Expectations will be determined based upon the scope of the project and student's goals. We seek motivated, focused, goal-oriented students able to thrive in an environment of mentoring and self-directed learning.

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Ariel Leifer

Email Address: aleifer@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Family Medicine

Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Women's health and reproductive healthcare.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
The student should have an interest in women's health, public health, health sciences research or social sciences research. Preferably someone who is considering a graduate degree in one of the health sciences - pharmacy, nursing, medicine, public health. The student should feel comfortable talking to strangers about their healthcare and contraceptive needs. Juniors and Seniors are preferred with a GPA of 3.5 and above. Students with any major are acceptable. No prior experience is necessary but a willingness and comfort to work in a new environment with minimal supervision is essential. The student will need to complete training in research with human subjects.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be responsible for approaching and interviewing women in the family medicine clinic about their goals and needs for reproductive healthcare. The student will have a brief, one page script to use. Consideration of the sensitive nature of the topic, respect for the patients' time and confidentiality are essential.

I prefer to be contacted by email.

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John P Leonard

Email Address: leonard@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 3055B SEL M/C 067 Phone: 9964261
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/bios/faculty/leonard/leonardj.shtml
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Research Interests: Molecular neurobiology of ion channel function
My laboratory is focused on neuronal ion channels. We are interested in both neurotransmitter-sensing and voltage-sensing types of channels. Most recent work involves cell surface receptors for glutamate. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. When glutamate binds to its receptor, a channel forms between the surface and the cytoplasm of the neuron allowing cationic current to flow. We study these ion channels by expressing them in a relatively simple, single-cell system, the Xenopus frog oocyte, that can then synthesize channels and incorporate them into the surface membrane. Because there are no glutamate receptors present in native oocytes, we control the types of channels that will be studied. It is also possible to alter the mRNA encoding a given subunit before injection to alter the channel structure produced. In this way we hope to find particular regions in different glutamate receptors that are responsible for their functional differences.

Our general area of interest is in the mechanisms that synapses have to change strength of transmission as a result of prior activation. For example, we have found that one type of glutamate receptor doubles its activity when re-tested after activation of a different type of glutamate receptor. Among the variety of endogenous agents that can cause modulation of neuronal ion channel we have recently chosen to concentrate on protein kinases. Protein kinases add a phosphate group to certain amino acid residues on the polypeptide chain. Such phosphorylation often modulates function of receptors just as it can for enzymes.

In a particularly robust example of phosphorylation causing neuromodulation, we have found that the activity of one type of glutamate receptor at a glutamatergic synapse could be changed by activity of another type at the same synapse. Selective activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors could change subsequent response at the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors. This greater than doubling of NMDA receptor current is mediated by activators of protein kinase type C (PKC). NMDA receptors require 2 types of subunits, NR1 and NR2, to bind both glutamate (NR2) and co-agonist glycine (NR1). There are 4 types of NR2 subunits (NR2A-D) found in different NMDA receptors, each with its own influence on functional properties. When the NR2A or NR2B subunit is co-expressed with the NR1 subunit, PKC dramatically increases the current through the receptor. On the other hand, when either the NR2C or NR2D subunit is co-expressed with the glycine binding subunit zeta-1, it prevents PKC from potentiating the receptor's current flow. Expression of point mutations at potential PKC phosphorylation sites present in NR2A and NR2B but absent in NR2C and NR2D have allowed us to identify 2 serine residues controlling direct action of PKC on NMDA receptors. There are also indirect actions of PKC via tyrosine kinases that remain to be studied. Currently we are constructing a knock-in mouse containing NR2A receptors with key phosphorylation sites eliminated. This will allow us to test the importance of these sites to natural physiology and ultimately, behavior of the whole animal.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA 3.5, Honors College students preferred. Sophomores and Juniors have longer opportunity to use newly developed skills. Seniors have less time to develop, especially do not take second semester seniors into the laboratory.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
To work dilligently and carefully under the supervision of a graduate student on mouse behavioral projects. Reliabilty and congeniality are essential.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Alex Leow

Email Address: aleow@psych.uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Associate professor
Office: 1601 West Taylor Street, #584 Phone: 6267578704
Webpage: brain.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
computational neuroimaging
connectomics
neuroscience
neuropsychiatry
MRI
EEG
transcranial stimulation

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
experience with scientific programming (especially Matlab).
numerical analysis
computational statistics

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Kelly LeRoux

Email Address: kleroux@uic.edu
College: Urban Planning and Public Affairs Department: Public Administration
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 131 CUPPA Hall Phone: 312-355-2672
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/cuppa/pa/faculty/leroux.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My current research projects focus on nonpartisan voter mobilization campaigns carried out by nonprofits, as well as nonprofits' political advocacy activities. My research tries to better understand how community-based nonprofits can help poor and marginalized groups have a greater voice in our democracy. I have worked with 9 undergraduate research assistants over the past five years around these topics and have found it to be a tremendously rewarding experience. Students that have worked with me have gained valuable research and professional skills, and have had their efforts formally acknowledged in the research publications that emerged from the projects they worked on. Students will also gain experience with database assembly and exposure to data analysis software, which are great skills to include on a resume.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9 (3 credit hours)

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA 3.0; preferred UPA or Political Science major. Junior/senior status preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
This elections season (fall 2012) I will undertaking a web-based survey of nonprofit organizations accross the U.S. to find out what activities and tactics they are using to mobilize their clients and communities to vote. I will also be doing some focus group interviews with immigrant service organizations in Chicago after the election. Students who are interested in this project could assist in a number of ways including helping to administer the survey, participating in and transcribing research interviews, coding qualitative data, and collecting information from other sources (census bureau, nonprofit financial reports, etc). Students who are interested in this research opportunity should contact me by e-mail for an interview and to further discuss the project. Students are expected to be motivated, and possess good communication skills both verbal and written.

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Eric Duane Leshikar

Email Address: leshikar@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Psychology

Webpage: http://psch.uic.edu/psychology/people/faculty/eric-leshikar
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
I am broadly interested in human memory. The work of my lab involves devising ways to improve human memory performance.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I expect a high level of commitment to the work of the lab.

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Irena Levitan

Email Address: levitan@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Allergy; Department of Medi
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Professor
Office: 3097 Phone: 996-0441
Webpage: https://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/directory/name/irena-levitan/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of vascular diseases, particularly high cholesterol, obesity, diabetes and pulmonary hypertension.

Our most recent projects include:

1. Impact of high cholesterol on K+ channels and their role in the control of vascular tone

2. Role of K+ channels in vascular dysfunction in obesity

3. Impact of dyslipidemia and obesity of endothelial and vascular stiffness

4. Impact of dyslipidemia on wound healing

5. Roles of K+ channels and high cholesterol in pulmonary hypertension

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
High motivation
Major in Biological Sciences or Bioengineering
Prior lab experience is helpful but not required

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students need to be highly motivated to do research, read literature and learn and perform specific experiments

Typically, a student chooses or is assigned to a specific project and works together with a more senior member of the lab, a graduate student or a postdoctoral fellow

It is expected that students will be able to generate and analyze new data for their projects

It is also expected that students will present their research as posters in local research events and competitions and there is a possibility to attend a national meeting if the project progresses well

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An Li

Email Address: anli@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 304 SPHW M/C 922 Phone: 9969597
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu./~anli
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
I am a researcher in environmental organic chemistry. The emphasis of my research is the behavior of persistent organic pollutants in the environment and in human. Such pollutant chemicals include, for example, the notorious polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and many pesticides including DDT. In recent years, my research has focused on “emerging” organic pollutants including many types of flame retardant chemicals used in various consumer goods. We investigate the concentration levels, the pollution history, and the emission sources of these chemicals in the environment as well as in homes and in human body. The currently active project is the Great Lakes Sediment Surveillance Program (GLSSP) funded by USEPA.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA of 3.0 is required. General chemistry laboratory skills are needed.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Undergraduate research assistants will be working under the direct supervision of graduate students, postdocs, and visiting scientists, at the Environmental Chemistry Laboratory of UIC School of Public Health. We are located on the west campus at 2121 W. Taylor Street. The major responsibility includes helping with various laboratory work such as washing glassware, sample preparation, data entry, and other errands. The expected work time is about 10 hr per week during semesters, and from 20-40 hr per week during summer. The schedule is flexible to some extent.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Jianxun Li

Email Address: jxli@uic.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Oral Biology
Office: 439A DENT M/C 690 Phone: 9963520

Research Interest:
Role of cytoskeleton remodeling in cellular immunity regulated by cell adhesion molecules

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing

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Jingjing Li

Email Address: jili@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1106 SEO Phone: 3129963420
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~jili
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The research of this lab focuses on optics at micro- and nano- meter scale, as well as metamaterials at microwave and optical frequency range. The scope also extends to the interdisciplanary area of optics, mechanics and bio-engineering. Currently, the lab is focused on integrated planar optics for imaging and sensing applications; metamaterials for bio-medical applications; Optical antennas and other plasmonic devices for light harvesting and bio applications; numerical electromagnetic tools; etc.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.5/4.0

Prerequisite: Depend on the projects. See below.

Preferred major: Electric Engineering

Year in College: Junior or Senior

Honors college student preference: Yes

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Possible projects suitable for undergraduates are constantly updated here. Please check back often.

The group is currently looking for undergraduate students to work on the following problem:
1) Modeling the dispersion property of dielectric material. The goal is to fit existing data of refractive index vs frequency for certain material to certain dispersion model (Lorentz model, Debye model, etc.), so that they can be used in numerical electromagnetic modeling. Typical materials include silicon, silicon nitride, GaAs, gold, silver, etc. The student is going to use Matlab to finish the job. Prerequisite: Basic programming experience (Matlab or C).

2) Parallel genetic algorithm. The goal is to write a program for general purpose genetic algorithm in C++, Python or other suitable programming language. Prerequisite: Basic programming experience. Parallel programming skills a plus.

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Weiguo Li

Email Address: wli20@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Bioengineering
Title: Director of MRI facility; Research Assistant Professor
Phone: 3124135638
Webpage: 835 S Wolcott Ave
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
MRI technique development and applications, RF coils design; molecular imaging; immunotherapy

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
third or fourth years in college. Bioengineering or Electrical and Computer Engineering,

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
self-discipline, proactive.

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Jiaqi Liang

Email Address: liangj@uic.edu
College: Urban Planning and Public Affairs Department: Public Administration
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: AEH 2115 Phone: 312-996-3183
Webpage: https://cuppa.uic.edu/profiles/liang-jiaqi/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Government performance, management of public organizations, bureaucratic politics, public policy process and analysis, diversity and social equity, environmental justice, environmental and energy policy

Part of my current research projects centers on how the policy design and implementation of both federal and state governments affect the environmental wellbeing of minority populations and low-income communities. My another research interest lies in the exploration of how government’s results-based management agenda affects public organizations’ performance.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.0;
Preferred major: social sciences, in particular public policy, political science, urban planning and policy
Year in college: junior/senior preferred
Training in data management, statistical analysis, GIS, geospatial analysis, and visualization is a plus

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Participating students will assist me in collecting and managing data (e.g., the American Community Survey from the Census Bureau, regulatory compliance and enforcement data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). Also, students will help me search and review literature.

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Robert C. Liden

Email Address: bobliden@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Managerial Studies
Title: Professor
Office: M/C Phone: 9960529
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Interpersonal processes within the context of leadership and small groups in organizational settings.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Should have an interest in applied psychology in organizational settings and have a willingness to learn about research methods and statistical analysis. Should have at least a 3.0 GPA. Good for students with aspirations to go to graduate school.

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Carmen Lilley

Email Address: clilley@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Secondary Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Title: Associate Professor
Office: ERF 3055 Phone: 312-413-7561
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:

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Andreas Linninger

Email Address: linninge@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Bioengineering
Secondary Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Professor
Office: SEO 206 Phone: 37743
Webpage: http://vienna.bioengr.uic.edu/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Targeted Nanoparticle drug delivery, Intrathecal Drug delivery, Modeling of the Cerebral Vasculature, Genetic Algorithm for Column Sequencing.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12

Qualifications of a Student:
Juniors and Seniors with a strong Engineering background. GPA greater than 3.5. Interest in working with models and simulations

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Familiarity with conservation laws and transport phenomena. Displays hard work, responsibility, and strong work ethic. Ability to work in a team.

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Matthew Liotine

Email Address: mliotine@uic.edu
College: Business Administration Department: Information and Decision Sciences
Secondary Department: Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
Title: Clinical Associate Professor
Office: 2119 UH Phone: 312-413-2360
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/cba/cba-depts/ids/facultyprofiles/mliotine.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
- Supply chain risk analysis
- Development of web portal for real time supply chain mobilization

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Familiarity with methods in operations management, supply chain management, quantitative methods in data analysis, use of MS Excel and analytics software. Or, skills in web site development, JAVA. .NET, etc.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student will assist with analytical model development, simulation analysis and data analysis. Possible prototype web site development.

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Pauline J. Lipman

Email Address: plipman@uic.edu
College: Education Department: Educational Policy Studies
Title: professor
Office: 1404 EPASW Phone: 312-413-4413
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
urban education
Chicago Public School Policy
race
inequality
urban development
gentrification

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
--classes in social context of education, sociology, or urban studies preferred
--major in education or social sciences
--knowledge of Chicago and Chicago public schools
--strong reading and writing skills
--experience collecting information and organizing and summarizing it preferred

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
--research archived sources (primarily on-line)
--internet searches
--analyze press releases, policy documents, media reports for key information
--organize and summarize key information
--develop tables, charts, summaries of key information
--bring awareness and sensitivity to racial and economic inequality to data analysis
--reliability

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Derong Liu

Email Address: derong@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Office: 1023 SEO M/C 154 Phone: 3554475
Webpage: http://cil.eecs.uic.edu/~dliu/

Research Interest:
Neural networks; Control Systems; Wireless networks

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing; Major in electrical or computer engineering; Good math skills

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Ying Liu

Email Address: liuying@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Secondary Department: Biopharmaceutical Sciences
Title: Associate professor
Office: CEB RM211 Phone: 312-996-8249
Webpage: liu.lab.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our research group is interested in the interface among microfluidics, nanotechnologies, cellular biology, and drug delivery. Specifically, we focus on the competitive kinetics of self-assembling processes to synthesize nano- and micro-particles with designed structures and functionalities in a scalable manner. Both numerical and experimental endeavor are implemented to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms and to provide heuristic parameters for these physical and chemical processes.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
minimum gpa: 3.0
preferred major: Engineering, biology, premed

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
conduct experiments
write reports
present research results

Most important: be curious

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Yuru Liu

Email Address: yuruliu@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pharmacology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: COMRB 4093 Phone: 312-996-1202
Webpage: http://mcph.uic.edu/liu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The normal alveolar epithelium is composed of two types of cells: flat type I cells, which comprise 95% of the gas-exchange surface, and cuboidal type II cells that secrete pulmonary surfactant. Injury of alveoli activates programs in potent type II cells that result in proliferation and differentiation into type I cells leading to alveolar barrier repair. Thus, type II cells function as “facultative progenitor cells” that have a crucial role in repair of the alveolar surface. We use mouse models such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection-induced lung injury to define sub-population of type II cells for the progenitor cell function. We also use genetic models to define the proteins responsible for transition of type II cells to type I cells required for recovery from PA induced injury. We are currently focusing on two areas: 1) The factors that induce the progenitor cells phenotype of type II cell. 2) The consequences of functionally disrupting activated type II cells in the mechanism of chronic lung diseases.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Jeffrey A. Loeb

Email Address: jaloeb@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine
Title: Professor and Head
Office: NPI North Bldg., Room 657 Phone: 996-6498
Webpage: http://www.genetics.wayne.edu/jloeb
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
MOLECULAR AND TRANSLATIONAL NEUROLOGY LABORATORY

BACKGROUND

Our Laboratory makes a concerted effort to develop a strong understanding of the developing nervous system as a means to understand human neurological disease and develop novel treatments. There are currently three areas of focus.



TROPHIC FACTORS IN DEVELOPMENT AND DISEASE

The first is understanding the early molecular events regulating the formation of synapses and axo-glial junctions in the developing nervous system. Our analysis centers on how soluble regulatory factors such as the neuregulins and neurotrophins work together with neuronal activity to orchestrate development. Many studies underway are examining how neuregulins themselves are regulated during development through regulation of their transcription, post-translational processing and association with the evolving extracellular matrix. One of our missions is to take principles learned from early development and apply these toward understanding and treating human diseases including multiple sclerosis and cancer. Toward this end we have developed a new way to target pharmaceuticals to specific regions in the body and have developed and are commercializing drugs that use this technology (see www.glytag.com).





THE HUMAN EPILEPTIC TRANSCRIPTOME AND DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL TREATMENTS FOR EPILEPSY

A second major focus is to decode what makes focal regions of human brain epileptic. We have taken a functional genomic approach using sophisticated microarray and bioinformatic technologies to map gene expression patterns to the electrical abnormalities in human epileptic tissues removed during epilepsy surgery. We have found a lot of similarities between focal epileptic regions and normal mechanisms that enhance learning and memory paving the way for the identification of new therapeutic targets in human epilepsy. Through this program, we have developed a collaborative project called the 'Systems Biology of Epilepsy Project' to bring together a wide range of physiological, molecular, and clinical aspects of human epilepsy into a centralized database.


THE ALS CLINIC AND RESEARCH CENTER
Most recently, we are developing novel translational research programs on Lou Gehrig's disease or ALS. We are exploring mechanisms of neuregulin signaling, testing a novel drug we developed, and screening for new targets using systems biology on rapid autopsy human tissues.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
We are looking for highly motivated, independent students interested in a career in biomedical sciences in general and neuroscience in particular with long-term goals of PhD, MD/PhD, or MD degrees.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student is expected to undertake an independent research project, keep careful notes, read literature, present work at lab meetings, and do high quality research that will result in research publications.

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Elizabeth A. Loentz

Email Address: loentz@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Germanic Studies
Title: Associate Professor and Head
Office: 1530 UH M/C 189 Phone: 4132370
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
German-Jewish Culture (mid-19th century to present)
Yiddish in Germany
Contemporary Minority Literature and Culture in Germany
Women's Writing and the Women's Movement (late 19th and early 20th century

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
An interest or background in one or more of the above areas.
One or more of the following would be useful, but are not required:
Reading knowledge of Yiddish or Hebrew characters -- especially handwritten Hebrew/Yiddish.
Reading knowledge of German (especially a willingness to learn "Fraktur" and old German handwriting styles).
Interest or experience in archival research.

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Saria Lofton

Email Address: slofto4@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Health Systems Science
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Office: 1038 Phone: 312-355-2125
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I investigate food access in the African-American community. I in interested in the proliferation of community-supported agriculture as well as ways to develop sustainable urban farms within the African-American community. I am currently working investigating the intended and unintended effects of community-supported agriculture.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Basic writing and computer skills; ability to use Excel; interest in health promotion, public health and community engagement; must have or be willing to obtain CITI (IRB) certification

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be managing qualitative data, conducting literature searches, providing analyses, and will have the opportunity to work on future publications.

The student will also be encouraged to provide substantial input on the research project.

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Luis F Lopez

Email Address: luislope@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies
Title: Professor of Spanish linguistics
Office: UH 1800 Phone: 312 996 5215
Webpage: http://hispanic.las.uic.edu/spanish/bilinguallab.shtml
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Linguistics, bilingualism, code-switching.
All aspects of linguistic theory referring to language structure and meaning. My current research agenda involves the linguistic competence of persons who have acquired two languages since early childhood.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
I am seeking students who are flexible and intellectually curious.

I am specially interested in students who have at least one of these qualifications: (i) basic linguistics background such as can be acquired in SPAN 206 (introduction to Hispanic linguistics) or some other basic linguistics course; (ii) a background in statistics, (iii) ability to set up web-based experiments.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We expect you to work in the lab for approximately 3-10 hours a week. It is crucial that you be dependable and never miss appointments. We will structure your stay in three phases. In phase 1 you will get to know the lab and its projects while spending at least a couple of days in each project. We will assign relevant readings. In phase 2 you will be working in a project as a member. You will help with experimental design, collection and statistical analysis of data. We will train you to do these things. In phase 3 you will write your own paper about your work on the project and we will help you present it at a student conference. Throughout, we will expect you to read and summarize some scholarly literature.

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Dagmar Lorenz

Email Address: dlorenz@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Germanic Studies
Title: Professor
Office: 1500 UH M/C 189 Phone: 4132376
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
German and Austrian Culture Studies; Holocaust literature and film; Germanophone Jewish literature; Literature by women; Crime in modern texts; Specieism and the Portrayal of Animals in German and Austrian Literature.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Computer literacy; use of Blackboard; Familiarity with library research tools; Knowledge of German a plus

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student would assist me in project and course preparation in my areas of research: conduct on-line and in-library research for books, articles, and films; check footnotes and format of articles and book chapters; help with book orders and photocopying of class materials, i.e. uploading reading material on Blackboard.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Gary Loy

Email Address: glloy618@gmail.com
College: Medicine Department: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Title: Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Office: 3000 North Halsted Phone: 773-296-7660
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Ultrasound investigation of fetal physiology and outcomes; Medical education curricular design; instructional methods and evaluation; Simulation in medical education; Reproductive effects of environmental toxins.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Knowledge of Excel required; knowledge of SPSS a serious consideration, knowledge of Access a plus

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Participation in study design, IRB approval, data gathering potentially, data organization and statistical analysis, drafting of abstracts and manuscripts.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Aerika Shiree Brittian Loyd

Email Address: brittian@uic.edu
College: Education Department: Educational Psychology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: EPASW 3521 Phone: 3129969478
Webpage: http://education.uic.edu/content/aerika-brittian-phd
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
ADAPT Lab research projects investigate how positive development occurs among urban adolescents of color in youth settings: juvenile justice, youth programs, and public schools. We are investigating complex relationships that exist between ethnic minority youth and their environment in order to understand how positive development among urban youth of color occurs. For example, how do ethnic minority youth navigate and construct their identities in urban schools, neighborhoods, and communities? How and in what ways do various social contexts impact positive identity development among urban ethnic minority adolescents? A second goal of ADAPT Lab research is to provide resources and make recommendations for culturally informed practice and policy, specifically related to adolescent's health and well-being. Active research projects:

*Adolescents’ Resilience through Action and Culture (ARAC)

*Restorative Justice in Schools

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Sophomore or Junior standing. Must have a minimum 3.25 GPA and majoring in human development, education, psychology (or a related discipline). Preference will be given to students who intend to pursue graduate school or have experience working with youth in youth settings. Experience with Microsoft office is required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be engaged in the following research activities:
• Assisting in conducting literature reviews
• Preparing print documents and flyers using Microsoft Word
• Assisting with youth organization contact and recruitment
• Collecting and entering data from human participants

• Students will acquire skills (e.g., develop presentation skills by participating in the Student Research Forum) and knowledge (e.g., adolescent development) that may assist them in their future career aspirations or pursuit of graduate training.

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Olga Lukina

Email Address: lukina@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Math, Statistics, and Computer Science
Title: Lecturer
Office: 621 SEO Phone: 312-413-3019
Webpage: http://homepages.math.uic.edu/~lukina
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Geometry, Topology, Dynamical Systems, Foliation Theory

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Math 210. Some familiarity with computational packages such as Mathematica or Maple is preferred, but not required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
In Fall 2018 I am organizing an undergraduate research project titled ``Visualizing fractals using 3D printing''. Detailed information about this project can be found at:

http://mcl.math.uic.edu/fall-2018-projects/

During the project, students will learn a few mathematical methods for constructing fractals, and learn how to use Mathematica or Maple and 3D printing software to visualize fractals.

The deadline to apply for this project is August 31, 2018. Application instructions can be found at:

http://mcl.math.uic.edu/apply/

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Hannah Lundberg

Email Address: hlundber@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Bioengineering
Title: Adjunct Assistant Professor
Office: 1611 W Harrison St. Suite 204E Phone: 312-942-1445
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am interested in the biomechanical function of human joints (natural and implanted). My laboratory uses computer modeling and other methods to investigate the loading of joints, how total joint replacements function in the body, and how total joint replacements can be improved. Students will learn about research processes for evaluating joints, and participate in musculoskeletal model creation.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Engineering or Kinesiology major, sophomore or above. Programming experience is beneficial.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students are expected to help with data collection and analysis and wil learn how to generate computer models using medical images and/or musculoskeletal software.

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Sarah Elizabeth Lutz

Email Address: selutz@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: COMRB 7093
Webpage: www.sarahlutzphd.com
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
We address damage and repair of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) in mouse models of human neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. We use genetic, pharmacologic, and intravital imaging approaches to assess blood vessel remodeling and immune cell infiltration of target organs in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis; regenerative medicine; cancer metastasis; and inflammatory bowel disease. Special focus on Wnt/beta-catenin and Caveolin-1. Our ultimate goal is developing new therapies for disease.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 16

Qualifications of a Student:
Prefer Junior year in college, completion of 2 or more lab classes, prefer but not require honors college participation. Minimum science GPA 3.0

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Conduct experiments, analyze data, present your findings. Hands-on mentorship and guidance. Must be willing to work hard, be responsible and professional. Commit to 16 hours/week for 3 semesters.

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Kevin L Lyles

Email Address: lyles@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Political Science
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1102a Phone: 6-3105
Webpage: https://sites.google.com/a/uic.edu/kevin-lyles/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
I specialize in American Politics, Courts, and Law. My research and teaching focus on American Constitutional Law; Civil Liberties and Civil Rights; and, I have special interests in African-American Legal History and the Constitutional and Legal Rights of Women. Currently, I am working on the 10th edition of my co-authored constitutional law textbook; a book on the late Justice Thurgood Marshall; and textbook for my African-American Legal History class (POLS 358).

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Preference given to advanced undergraduate students with some background/interests in law/courts/constitutional law (e.g., PolS 353, PolS 354, PolS 356, PolS 358 or PolS 451, or related courses in Criminal Justice and/or Political Science. Pre-law students are especially encouraged to apply. Students majoring in Political Science, Criminal Justice, African-American Studies, Gender and Women's Studies are especially encouraged to apply.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will primarily conduct legal research and assist in manuscript preparation for textbooks in the area of American Constitutional Law.

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Jeremy A Lynch

Email Address: jlynch42@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: MBRB 4020 Phone: 6-5460
Webpage: http://bios.uic.edu/bios/people/faculty/jeremy-lynch
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
****Currently unable to accommodate more students. Check back in future semesters for re-opening of positions***

I am generally interested in the molecular and cellular mechanisms of the emergence of pattern and form during animal development, and in particular how these mechanisms change in the course of evolution.

The insects are an ideal model clade with which to approach these questions, due to their species richness, developmental diversity, and the ability to test gene function in a number of species representing a broad phylogenetic range.

Currently two major topics are the foci of my work: 1) The evolution of mechanisms for establishing and patterning the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of insect embryos, and 2) The evolution of germline establishment and function in insects, primarily focusing on holometabolous insects. In both cases the wasp Nasonia vitripennis is the main model employed to gain insights into the evolution of these processes. This species has the advantages that it is easily kept in the lab, has a fully sequenced genome, and is amenable to both parental RNAi and germline transformation to test gene function (conditions for the latter are currently being optimized).
I am also adding a new project where the molecular basis of morphological evolution will be examined using the unique genetic properties of the Nasonia system.



Keywords: Genetics, genomics, developmental biology, insects, evolution, embryos, ovaries

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
Sophomores or Juniors, a major in biological sciences is preferred, but others will be conisdered (such as computer science majors with interest in bioinformatics), no prior experience is necessary. Sincere interest in and enthusiasm for developmental and/or evolutionary biology is the only hard and fast requirement.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student should come with a willingness and eagerness to learn, and the discipline to see the project through to its conclusion. Meeting the minimum time requirement it essential for obtaining and maintaining laboratory skills.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Leilah B. Lyons

Email Address: llyons@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Secondary Department: Learning Sciences Research Institute
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1132 SEO Phone: 312-355-1310
Webpage: http://www.cs.uic.edu/~llyons/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My main area of research interest is in the design of collaborative, computer-based museum exhibits. I have also done a great deal of work with complex system simulations in museums, classrooms, and in urban planning contexts. I am interested in the ways in which user interface design can be used to scaffold collaborative learning processes. I am also interested in how to make simulated scientific phenomena more accessible to learners: via the selection of appropriate technologies, the design of the user interface, and the activity design. As a consequence, my lab has worked with a range of technologies, from mobiles to computer vision to tangible user interfaces to embodied interaction. We have made a polar bear role-playing game for the Brookfield Zoo, an embodied data interaction exhibit for the Jane Addams Hull House, a table-based urban planning game, among other projects. Much of the research work comes AFTER building these experiences: we videotape users and try to figure out what they are learning from the experience by examining what they say and do, which we determine by examining log files of their interactions. Thus we use a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should have a minimum GPA of 3.6, a good work ethic, and good language and communication skills. A qualified student will have, above all else, an interest in discovering how researchers can use different kinds of data to better understand how learners come to understand science topics. They do not need to have any prior knowledge of computer programming or technology. Students can be in any grade level, and would ideally be in a major where the skills they will acquire on this project will help them explore possible job interests (e.g., being a usability designer or researcher, a learning researcher, a psychology researcher, or someone interested in science or math education in classrooms or in museums or in the "real world"). The science topics we deal with involve ecology, animal behavior and physiology, and climate change. The math topics we deal with involve spatial reasoning and graph interpretation. We also educate people about professions like urban planning. If a student has a background in any of these areas it might be helpful for them as they conduct the work.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We need help with transcribing and coding our videotapes of learners interacting with games. Transcribing entails listening to what users say and typing it out (we have specialized software that makes this process easy to do), "coding", in this context, means trying to figure out what the learner meant by making a given statement. Each statement will be labeled by a "code" - a label that indicates the kind of statement being made (e.g., a "question" or a "statement"; a statement referring to the "part" or to the "future", etc.). Our group will provide the "coding scheme," i.e., the labels to use. These techniques are common in Learning Sciences research, Psychology research, Human-Computer Interaction research, and Education research. We also want the student to assist our team in analyzing the coded data, as this is where the "payoff" is: you can tally up differences in overall behavior across experimental conditions, start seeing patterns of behavior over time, and compare how different learners respond to the learning experience. The analyzed data is used to help revise the design of the learning experience. We do not expect that the student will have skills with the software or tasks mentioned here, but will train the student in their use. Work will be conducted on computers in our lab, and students will be surrounded by experienced graduate students who can help them with questions at any time.

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Anna Lysakowski

Email Address: alysakow@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Title: Professor
Office: 513 CMW M/C 512 Phone: 996-5990
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcan/faculty.htm
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Study of inner ear hair cells, afferent and efferent innervation; Development of hair cells and how their development changes with sensory stimulation; Ion channel and molecular composition of sensory afferent endings; Ultrastructural modeling of hair cell hair bundles using high-voltage EM images. Techniques used are animal dissections, immunohistochemistry at the light and electron microscopic levels, computer modeling and 3D reconstruction, RT-PCR, Western blots, co-immunoprecipitation.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
prefer honors college students with prior lab experience; biology or chemistry majors preferred; 3.5 minimum GPA; Work-Study-eligible

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
An interest in the inner ear, neuroscience, or in biological questions.

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Clare Lyster

Email Address: clyster@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Architecture
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 115A Phone: 312 731 4082
Webpage: http://www.cluaa.com
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Architecture / Urbanism / Systems

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8 hrs (approx)

Qualifications of a Student:
3rd or 4th year student from School of Architecture to work on the representation of a range of design projects. Emphasis on urbanism and planning scale projects.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Good graphic skills, inc. Rhino; Illustrator and PShop.
Interested in urban scale design thinking.

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Patrisia Macias

Email Address: pmacias@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Sociology
Secondary Department: Latin American and Latino Studies
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 4140A
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Race, Immigration Enforcement;
Migration & Security;
Law and Policy

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.5;
Preferred major: sociology, LALS, urban studies, history, honors college;
Years in college: junior& seniors;
Experience: detailed-oriented, self-directed.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Library & historical research; formatting citations and bibliographies; proofreading.

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Sangeetha Madhavan

Email Address: smadhava@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Physical Therapy
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: AHS 447 Phone: 312 355 2517
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My long term goal is to better understand how the brain controls human movement, and to identify optimal procedures to enhance neural plasticity. Particularly we are trying to develop movement and stimulation based therapies to maximize functional recovery after neuromuscular system injury. Currently, we are testing non-invasive brain stimulation paradigms as candidate adjuvants to gait therapy to enhance walking capacity in stroke survivors. We use state of the art technology like MRI and transcranial magentic stimulation to better understand the changes that occur in the brain after stroke.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
I am looking for reliable and committed students that are willing to learn and gain experience in the research field of neuroscience or rehabilitation. Potential students must be willing to commit at least 5 and up to 10 hours per week. Students must also have a strong GPA and preferably have interest/background in biology, physiology, and/or exercise sciences.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You would be involved in research related to rehabilitation. Currently, there a multiple studies being done in my research lab. One study is understanding how the brain controls lower limb motor control using MRI and TMS, and developing a new brain stimulation technique to enhance walking in stroke patients. This experience would be a great opportunity for you to expand your knowledge and skills in the medical and rehabilitation sciences. If you are thinking of pursuing graduate school, this opportunity would give you great experience and preparation in accomplishing this task.

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Susan Magasi

Email Address: smagas1@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Occupational Therapy
Secondary Department: Disability and Human Development
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1919 W. Taylor, Rm.327 Phone: 312-996-4603
Webpage: http://www.ahs.uic.edu/facultyresearch/profiles/name,11297,en.html
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Health care access disparities
Cancer health equity
People with disabilities
community-based participatory research
qualitative, outcomes and survey research

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Interest in: 1) working with people with disabilities, 2) healthcare policy or 3) health disparities.
Pre-occupational therapy students encouraged to apply.
Good academic standing - gpa 3.5 or higher
Strong work ethic and good reliability.
Experience in marketing and public relations is an asset.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We have received a small Acting Up Award from the Chicago Community Trust to create ScreenABLE Saturday to promote accessible mammograms for women with disabilities.

We are looking for students who can join our community-engaged research team to help develop, promote, coordinate and evaluate the event.

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Mustafa Mahamid

Email Address: mmahamid@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Civil and Materials Engineering
Title: Clinical Associate Professor
Office: ERF 3069 Phone: 3123550364
Webpage: http://www.cme.uic.edu/CME/ProfileMahamid
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Structural Engineering, Earthquake Engineering, Construction Methods, Steel Structures, Concrete Structures, Masonry Structures.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
Should have 3.0 min GPA, have taken structural design courses from CME department, Civil engineering major, senior student with some experience in design.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Scaffolding is a necessary temporary structure that is used to build structures, including but not limited to buildings, bridges, and non-building structures. There are so many means and methods for scaffolding in the United States and around the world, several material types used for this purpose such steel, wood and aluminum, different connection types, different erection methods, and most importantly different safety requirements. Building scaffolding is extremely important to construction workers from safety perspectives as they need to feel safe and comfortable during construction which should allow them build buildings accurately that should be safe and functional for the structures users during the life of the structure. Additionally, several material types are used for this type of structures; therefore looking at the material used in the US and around the world is important from sustainability stand point. The purpose of this research is to investigate the different types of scaffolding types, erection methods, safety measures, material, sustainability and come up with a study and a recommendation for best practices. This should help contractors, engineers and architects look at the different practices around the world and help them choose what is safer, efficient, and sustainable.

The student is expected to do the research on the different types of scaffolding around the world and investigate material used, erection method, safety measure, and sustainability issues.

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Pauline Maki

Email Address: pmaki1@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Professor
Office: 328 NPI M/C 913 Phone: 312-996-6941
Webpage: https://www.psych.uic.edu/research/womens-mental-health-research-program
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Women's mental health; female-related risk factors for cognitive decline and mood disturbance; neuroimaging; perinatal mental health; gut microbiome

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
The student should be in good academic standing with a strong GPA (3.0 or above) and have an interest in women’s mental health, psychology, psychiatry, medicine, nursing, epidemiology, microbiome, biology, nutrition, immunology, computational biology, engineering or related field.

First-year students, sophomores or juniors enrolled at UIC are preferred. We strongly prefer a 2-year commitment from students because of the effort required to train undergraduates in our research methods. Exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis for seniors.

We prefer students who are comfortable working with Excel. Previous experience with REDCap is ideal. Preference may be given to students in the Honors College; students who have completed courses in research methods or statistics; and/or students with a background in statistics, engineering, epidemiology and/or computer science.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The Women’s Mental Health Research Program is seeking volunteer Undergraduate Research Assistants (URAs) to work with Dr. Maki and her team on ongoing research studies. A key focus of our team is mental health in pregnant and postpartum women, with special emphasis in the relationships between hormonal, immune and neurological systems and the microbiome. These complex interactions have been coined as the “brain-gut axis”. The brain-gut axis is a new promising avenue to treat mental health disorders using probiotics.

Students should be self-motivated and display a high attention to detail.

URAs will assist with:
- Data entry and database management
- Patient recruitment, screening and consenting research participants in clinical settings
- Obtaining and tracking specimens from the enrolled participants

If you are in a biology-related major (e.g., molecular biology, nutrition, nursing, medicine), you may also assist with:
- Processing blood samples for single cell RNA-seq analysis and flow cytometry, metabolomics and proteomics assays
- Performing immunoassays using multiplex ELISA techniques
- Processing stool, vaginal, saliva and skin samples for next generation sequencing, i.e., 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenomics analysis, and metabolomics analysis
- Performing DNA extraction, PCR amplification and construction of libraries for 16S rRNA and shotgun sequencing
- Computational microbiome sample analysis

If you are a student with a computational background, you may also assist with:
- Developing databases to collect survey results, medical records and other relevant information.
- Building up computational pipelines to automatically extract medical records from participants enrolled in our study.
- Developing statistical and computational models to predict the likelihood of perinatal mental health disorders based on questionnaires, medical records and any other relevant participant’s information

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Ayako Makino

Email Address: aymakino@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism; Department of Medicine
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 835 S Wolcott St. E613 Phone: 312-355-1018
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Research interest in our laboratory centers on the modulation of endothelium function in pathological state. We investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms of coronary vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetes with the focus on vascular rarefaction and attenuated vascular relaxation. Ongoing research projects in the lab are 1) GAP junction intercellular communication (GJIC) between endothelial cells, 2) Ca2+ homeostasis in endothelial cells, 3) Mitochondrial morphology and physiology in endothelial cells.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10 hours

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.00. Prerequisite classes necessary: physiology, and cell biology. Preferred major: human anatomy, biochemistry, and bioengineering. At least two semesters are required to work.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student is expected to participate in a small research project with a research specialist in the lab. The student is expected to come to work on time and follow instructions from his/her mentor.

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Silvia Malagrino

Email Address: libraes@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Photo/Film/Video
Title: Professor
Office: 106 JH M/C 036 Phone: 9963337
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/aa/artd/f_malagrino.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am a photographer and a filmmaker. I work in Contemporary Art/Photography/Film/Video. In my work I have addressed Latin American History, Holocaust History and Human Rights.

I experiment with the different mediums to create images that are poetic and thought provoking.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Seniors
Preferred major: Honors College, Art and Design, Photography, New Media, Moving Image, Studio Arts.

Knowledge of Apple Macintosh. Photoshop. Any video and audio editing software,responsive hardware and software-Arduino.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student must have problem solving skills, must be eager to learn and work independently. Organizational skills, efficiency, flexibility, dependability are
important.

The Student will help to scan images, copy images, research in the internet and prepare media for video and DVD output.

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Robert Paul Malchow

Email Address: paulmalc@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4083 SEL Phone: 312-413-1552
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/bios/faculty/malchow/malchowr.shtml
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Neuronal function and modulation of retinal cells at the cellular and molecular level.


What are the cellular and molecular mechanisms employed by neurons to communicate with one another? How is such communication altered by neuromodulators? What role do the more numerous glial cells of the nervous system play in altering neuronal activity? My laboratory uses the retina as a model neuronal system to address such questions, with the hope that answers will allow us to better understand the mechanisms by which we see, think, and experience emotions.


The molecular mechanisms controlling the release of neurotransmitters is one aspect of study in my laboratory, as are the molecular systems responsible for terminating the effects of these neuroactive agents, a process likely to involve proteins that transport neurotransmitters and their breakdown products into neurons and surrounding glia cells. My laboratory uses electrophysiological and imaging techniques to examine the characteristics of nerve cells and to probe the effects of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators on retinal neurons and glia. We are also developing new sensing methods to measure the release and uptake of neuroactive compounds from these cells. We are presently focusing on the role
that zinc, H+ and ATP play in retinal processing, and are also developing methods to monitor changes in metabolism of neurons by measuring oxygen consumption from individual cells. Ultimately, we hope that these studies will shed light on the cellular and molecular processes that enable visual perception, and believe that our findings will have general applicability to neurons in far removed parts of the nervous system.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6-9 hours

Qualifications of a Student:
Strong interest in the molecular and cellular mechanisms which enable the nervous system to function; highly inquisitive about the world around us; willingness to ask questions when a concept or idea or technique is not clear; dedication to coming on time and putting in the hours agreed to on a regular basis; willingness to work congenially with other undergraduate and graduate students in the lab; self-starter.


Beneficial but not absolutely required: Bios 100; Chem 112, 114; Bios 240 (Homeostasis – Intro to Physiology of Plants & Animals); Bios 286 (Biology of the Brain); a good academic track record (B or better overall in course work) Other courses that might prepare a student to get the most out of this research experience: Bios 272 (Comparative anatomy & physiology); Bios 484 & 485 (Neuroscience I & II)

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Undergraduate students participating in this research program will be involved in creating the special electrodes and sensors that we are using to measure the release and uptake of neuroactive chemicals from neurons. They will also learn cell culture techniques and use these methods to produce and maintain
isolated retinal cell cultures. Students will also learn how to prepare physiological solutions for use in such experiments.

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Asrar Malik

Email Address: abmalik@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Pharmacology
Office: E403 MSB M/C 868 Phone: 9967635
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcph/malik.htm

Research Interest:
Genetic engineering and drug discovery

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of some coursework in physics, chemistry, and biology

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Andrew Malone

Email Address: amalone@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Earth and Environmental Sciences
Title: Visiting Assistant Professor
Office: 2476
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I research the mechanisms for past climate changes and the human impacts of present and future climate change, using mountain glaciers as a proxy for climate change and a vital natural resource. My primary techniques include: data analysis, numerical and mathematical modeling, and remote sensing. I focus mainly on glaciers and communities in the tropical Andes (South America) but am also working on a project in the European Alps. The objectives of my research are to better understand fundamental physical and chemical processes in the Earth System, collect new data in data-sparse regions, and provide information that will improve community resilience to current and future climate changes.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 1 to 2 Credit Hours (3 to 6 hours per week)

Qualifications of a Student:
I am looking for motivated and enthusiastic students. My current research assistants are in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department but that is not a requirement. Curiosity, however, is a must.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
A student will either take the lead on a small part of one of my current research projects or I am happy mentoring a student in a student-identified project. Projects related to my current research could include:
1) mapping glacier coverage and quantifying glacier change in Southern Peru using satellite data,
2) tracking spatial and temporal variability of snow cover on glaciers using satellite data,
3) quantifying the rates and key processes for current glacier change using data analysis techniques,
4) identifying dominate energy exchange processes for tropical glaciers using numerical models (proficiency in python is a must for this project).
For Projects 1 through 3, no previous technical experience is required; a desire to learn new techniques and software is a must.

As a research assistant, you and I will meet once a week for 1 hour to check-in on weekly progress, trouble-shoot problems, and identifying the next week's research targets. You will then be expected to spend 2 to 5 hours per week between meetings (depending on the number of credit hours) conducting research towards these targets. Your research will culminate in a 10-minute slide show presentation that you give to my research group at the end of the semester. There is also the possibility to present research at an academic conference during a subsequent semester and/or co-authorship on publications.

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Hari Manev

Email Address: hmanev@psych.uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Office: 238A PI M/C 912 Phone: 4134195
Webpage: http://www.psych.uic.edu/faculty/hmanev.htm

Research Interest:
Molecular mechanisms and genes involved in antidepressant action; Brain aging

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Strong interest in neuroscience

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Neal Mankad

Email Address: npm@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 4178 SES Phone: x5-4990
Webpage: http://www.chem.uic.edu/mankad/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our group designs inorganic and organometallic complexes capable of doing productive chemistry with typically-inert small molecules like CO2, N2O, H2, etc. The chemistry of these small molecules has implications in many areas, ranging from alternative energy conversion to environmental protection to chemical synthesis. Thorough understanding of the bonding and physical properties of our inorganic compounds allows us to rationally design complexes for these purposes.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferred major: Chemistry. Prerequisites: Knowledge of organic and inorganic chemistry. Minimum GPA: 3.5. Honors college students are welcome. Students entering their sophomore, junior, and senior years will be considered.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Undergraduate researchers will develop individual projects under the mentorship of both a senior graduate student or postdoctoral researcher as well as the faculty supervisor. Much of the research will involve compounds that are highly sensitive to air and moisture, and so many specialized techniques will require mastery prior to students gaining full independence. In addition to laboratory hours, undergraduate researchers will be expected to attend regular group meetings to discuss research.

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Alexander Mankin

Email Address: shura@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology
Title: Professor and Director
Office: 3052 MBRB M/C 870 Phone: 4131406
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~shura/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Protein synthesis; Ribosomal RNA functions; Mechanisms of antibiotic action

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
GPA:3.5
Majors: Bio or Chem
Required basic knowledge of molecular biology or biochemistry or microbiology

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




William Ernest Mansky

Email Address: mansky1@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Computer Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 1331
Webpage: https://www.cs.uic.edu/~mansky/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I work in the areas of programming languages, program verification, and concurrency. My research projects involve using interactive theorem provers to build mathematical proofs that programs execute correctly, and developing the theory needed to describe how programs execute. Current projects include modeling I/O and concurrency behavior of C programs, developing logics for concurrent programs, and proving the correctness of real-world programs such as web servers and databases.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Good basic logic skills (propositional logic, proof by induction) are a must. Exposure to functional programming is helpful.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Learn to use interactive theorem-proving software to prove correctness of programs. Read related research papers. Complete a project, most likely involving proving the correctness of a program of interest.

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Ali Mansoori

Email Address: mansoori@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Bioengineering
Secondary Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Professor
Office: 204 SEO M/C 063 Phone: 996-5592
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~mansoori/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Atomic and molecular nanotechnology, molecular based study of disease diagnostic methods and therapeutic agents, nanobiostructures design (nanoclusters, nanoconjugates, nanoparticles), phase transitions, ab initio methods, density functional and molecular dynamics simulations, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics.

Specific ongoing projects:

1. Cancer nanotechnology - Cancer detection, prevention and teatment through nanotechnology.
2. Alzheimer's disease nanotechnology - Development of very early (in vivo and in vitro) detection as well as (neuroprotective and regenerative) diagnostic methods.
3. Supercritical fluids and their applications.
4. Alternative and fossil energy resources.

Please visit my website at wwww.uic.edu/~mansoori/ for more information.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: Open

Qualifications of a Student:
Engineering or science major; Good experimental or computer programming (Visual Basic, C++, Flash or Fortran) knowledge; Good mathematical or analytical background

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
To perform supervised research in the areas mentioned above.

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Rama Mantena

Email Address: rmantena@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: History
Secondary Department: Global Asian Studies Program
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 929 UH
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
British Empire, Colonial and Postcolonial India, Nationalism, Regionalism, Civil society

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Reading proficiency in Urdu or Telugu would be nice but not necessary. Prior exposure to South Asia courses at UIC. Majors: History, Anthropology, English.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Research for a history project on 20th century British India and Hyderabad.

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Ourania Marinatos

Email Address: nannom@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Classics and Mediterran Studies
Title: Professor
Office: UH 1800 Phone: 312 9962291
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Ancient History with a focus on the 5th century historian Thucydides and the values he has inherited from his predecessor Herodotus.
Although current debates among historians today center on political theory, this project will explore the value system. Values drove both historians to formulate their theories. Perhaps they even overlapped in time and discussed issues during the Peloponnesian War.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior in history or Classics. Minimum GPA 3.60

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Assistance is needed in areas of 1. current bibliography through thorough search of J-store. 2. meticulous search for passages in Herodotus and Thucydides that reveal the value system of both historians.

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Ane Maria Marinez-Lora

Email Address: amarinez@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: 1747 W. Roosevelt Road, Rm. 322 Phone: 312-413-9802
Webpage: http://www.psych.uic.edu/2013-07-19-15-32-26/154-about-us/directory/faculty/472-ane-m-marinez-lora-phd
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The Latino Parents Helping Their Children to Change Project is an NIMH-funded mixed method inquiry of the adaptations community-based mental health professionals make to evidence-based interventions. In this project clinicians were trained on a behavioral parent training program and used this program with Latino immigrant parent-child dyads. Upon completion of the program, clinicians and parents participated in semi-structured interviews and focus groups where they were asked about their experiences of the program. The information learned was used to inform the development of a culturally adapted version of the behavioral parent training program being tested. Undergraduate research assistants will learn about community-based services research with a specific focus on Latino immigrants, qualitative and quantitative inquiry, and the challenges of bringing evidence-based interventions to real world settings.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
1) Interest in learning about community research and the provision of mental health services to Latino communities

2) Preferred major: Psychology, Social work, Sociology

3) Minimum GPA: 2.75

4) Prior undergraduate coursework in research methods

5) Basic familiarity with SPSS

6) Bilingual: Fluent in English and Spanish

7) Ability to be organized in order to meet deadlines on time

8) Detail oriented

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
1) Assist with the coding of qualitative data

2) Assist with data entry and management

3) Ability to read, write and speak Spanish required

4) Read and discuss assigned readings

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John Marko

Email Address: jmarko@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Physics
Office: 2374 SES M/C 273 Phone: 9966064
Webpage: http://physicsweb.phy.uic.edu/people/others/display.asp?Name=Marko&First=John&Class=AdjunctFaculty

Research Interest:
Biological Physics; DNA organization in cells

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing; Biochemistry, bioengineering or physics major

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David Xavier Marquez

Email Address: marquezd@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Kinesiology and Nutrition
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1919 W. Taylor Phone: 312.996.1209
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/epl/index.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Marquez' area of specialization is in Exercise Psychology/Behavioral Medicine. His research agenda focuses on health disparities in physical activity and disease/disability among Latinos.

His research utilizes a social cognitive framework and includes study of the physical activity levels of Latinos and the physical, cultural, environmental, and psychological determinants and outcomes of physical activity of Latinos. He is interested in using randomized controlled trials and community-based interventions towards the prevention of disability and the maintenance of cognitive functioning and quality of life in older Latino adults.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: Negotiable

Qualifications of a Student:
Hard working
Bilingual English/Spanish
Interest in health research

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Following training, responsibilities will include assisting with recruitment; data collection; data analysis; and presentations.

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Tanera Marshall

Email Address: tmarshal@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Theatre and Music
Title: Dialect Collection
Office: L017 Phone: 312.996.7660
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Collecting dialects, through audiorecorded interviews of select speakers of English. Interested primarily, but not exclusively, in the indigenous populations and tribes of the North American Midwest. Would like to connect with UIC's Native American Center.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 4

Qualifications of a Student:
Any and all Theatre Majors who meet these requirements are invited to apply:
GPA at least 3.5, grade of B or better in Voice I and II courses, facility with recording equipment and editing of audio files

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Interview subjects, edit recordings, prepare text files. Upload all information to the online archive IDEA.

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Robert D Martin

Email Address: rbtmarti@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Anthropology
Title: Adjunct Professor and Researcher
Office: at The Field Museum Phone: 312-665-7809
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
As a biological anthropologist, my primary field of research interest is the evolutionary biology of primates. I accordingly use a broad-based approach involving comparisons of primates generally, although in certain instances I do focus specifically on hominid evolution. It is my conviction that confident interpretation of hominid evolution requires a sound understanding of primate evolution in general. My research involves both extant and fossil primates, so it includes palaeontology. One over-arching research interest is in allometric analyses, in which quantitative features are considered in relation to body size. The main aim in such analyses is to identify the scaling effects of body size so that special adaptations in individual species can be recognized as departures from the general trend. I have particularly worked on scaling effects in relation to the brain and reporoductive biology in primates. Another interest is in investigating times of origin for primates and for subgroups thereof. With respect to student projects, I particularly aim to promote topics that involve museum-based reseach using the extensive collections at The Field Museum.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9 hours

Qualifications of a Student:
Prior knowledge of biological anthropology, including primate evolution and some basis statistics, would be a distinct advantage. However, I would regard appropriate training in required techniques as my responsibility for any student working with me.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will be expected to be highly motivated for research relating to primate evolution. Following initial training, considerable independence of thought and action will also be needed. Adequate exploration of the relevant literature and satisfactory writing-up of results will also be expected.

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Farzad Mashayek

Email Address: mashayek@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Title: Professor and Head
Office: 2037 ERF Phone: 61154
Webpage: http://www.mie.uic.edu/bin/view/MIE/ProfileMashayek
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Computational Fluid Dynamics
Turbulence
Combustion
Supersonic Flow
Spray and Atomization
Plasma

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA of 3.25

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
To assist graduate students in their research while gaining research experince

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Biji Mathew

Email Address: bijim@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anesthesiology
Secondary Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: 835 S Wolcott Ave, MSB E717 Phone: 3123551694
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We focus on diseases affecting eyes, more specifically retinal injury due to ischemia mimicking diabetic retinopathy.Retinal ischemia-associated retinal degeneration is one of the leading causes of vision loss and to this date there are no effective treatment options. we are researching the molecular, genetic and biochemical mechanisms leading to retinal injury and vision loss using our in vivo and in vitro models. Another interesting area of our research is application of stem cells, stem cell conditioned media and stem cell derived exosomes as therapeutic strategy.

Our lab is quite new here at UIC.Currently we have 3 honors college students involved in various stages of research. our students participated in the UIC forum competitions,submitted abstracts for international and national conferences.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12-15

Qualifications of a Student:
If you are someone motivated and passionate about research, and has time available 3-5 hours while you are here, you can contact us. We are here on Saturdays and when ever you need.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Dedication, motivation and passion for research.

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Mathew Mathew

Email Address: mtmathew@uic.edu or mathew_t_mathew@rush.edu
College: Dentistry Department: Restorative Dentistry
Secondary Department: Bioengineering
Title: Adjunct Assistant Professor
Phone: 3129428310
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Bio-corrosion, Tribocorrosion, Implant materials (Dentistry and orthopedics), Surface characterization of biomaterials

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Interested in research

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Alicia Matthews

Email Address: aliciak@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Health Systems Science
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: College of Nursing, 845 S. Damen, Rm. 1060 Phone: 312-996-7885
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am a clinical psychologist with expertise in health disparities research with racial and ethnic minority groups and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) populations. My program of research focuses on the development of culturally targeted health promotion interventions in the area of cancer prevention and control. My current funded research examines smoking cessation outcomes associated with culturally targeted smoking cessation treatments for LGBT smokers and African American smokers who are HIV-positive.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5-10

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should have a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Students majoring in psychology, nursing, medicine, or public health are preferred but not a required. Students should have prior research experience and high levels of comfort in working with members from diverse population groups. There may be opportunities for students needing capstone or honor college projects.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be expected to learn a range of research skills in conducting randomized smoking cessation interventions. Tasks may include: literature searches, qualitative data analysis, data collection, subject recruitment, and material development.

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Lynnette Katharine Mawhinney

Email Address: lynnette@uic.edu
College: Education Department: Curriculum and Instruction
Title: Chair and Associate Professor
Office: 3238 ETMSW Phone: 6-7327
Webpage: lynnettemawhinney.com
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My research focuses on the professional lives of current, aspiring, and former urban teachers. I also specialize in work around teachers of color and diversifying the field. I mainly utilize qualitative methodological approaches, specifically life history interviews and autoethnography. I am looking to explore more within photovoice methodology to use as a justice-oriented tool for urban teachers and students.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
I am looking for a student that is a sophomore or higher. Specifically, I am looking for someone that is interested in education, sociology, or anthropology fields. Since more work revolves around race and teachers of color, I need someone not afraid to discuss and explore these issues. Some prior knowledge and understanding of the parts of research (literature review, methods, findings, etc.) will be critical. Most importantly, I am looking for a student that is focused and goal oriented, works well as a team and independently.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
I am looking for a student that is learning to gain experience with coding qualitative data, writing literature reviews, and writing articles. I have published alongside a number of my undergraduate students in the past, and I find it to be a rewarding experience for all parties.

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Theodore Mazzone

Email Address: tmazzone@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism; Department of Medicine
Office: 612 CMW M/C Phone: 9967989

Research Interest:
Diabetes; Atherosclerosis; Lipid Metabolism; Macrophage Cell Biology; Regulation of Gene Expression

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or Senior; Courses in cell biology/ molecular biology/biochemistry including courses with a lab component

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William Patrick McCarty

Email Address: mccartyw@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Criminology, Law, and Justice
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4060A BSB Phone: 312-355-0837
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Neighborhoods and crime; policing; serial homicide

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
I would prefer a student who is a criminology, law and justice major. I would also prefer a student who is a junior or senior at UIC and has experience with research methods.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Varied, but student could be expected to conduct historical or archival research, data entry and analysis, assist with academic conference presentations, and/or help prepare articles for publication in peer-reviewed journals. Specifically, as of 2018, we have extensive data related to police officer body-worn cameras, which can be used to prepare journal articles and presentations at academic conferences.

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Ellen McClure

Email Address: ellenmc@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: French and Francophone Studies
Secondary Department: History
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1613 UH Phone: 6-5065
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Theories of creation and authorship, particularly in early modern Europe, but also today.
The interrelationship of Europe and Asia (particularly India and China) during the early modern period.
Comparative religion, theories and discourses of idolatry.
Seventeenth-century French literature and culture.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 1

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA of 3.5
Preferred knowledge of French, although other languages/backgrounds considered
Junior or senior

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will work with me to develop an annotated bibliography on the topic that we will select together and meet weekly to discuss findings and progress. Time permitting, the student may also write a short (5+ pages) paper summarizing the findings and reviewing the literature.

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Neal Joseph McCollam

Email Address: nealmac@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Theatre and Music
Title: Coordinator of Theatre Operations
Office: L284 Phone: 3129963991
Webpage: http://theatreandmusic.aa.uic.edu
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Researching best practices for recruiting High School
Performing Arts students.Researching best practices for marketing arts programs. Researching high profile and highly successful undergraduate performing arts programs recruiting and marketing strategies.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6-12 hrs

Qualifications of a Student:
Students with an interest in Arts Administration or Marketing preferred. Strong communication skills preferred. Microsoft Office software knowledge a plus. Experience in Performing Arts a plus. All Sophomore level or above, or Freshman theatre or music majors should be encouraged to apply.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be expected to assist in coordination of communication with Illinois and out of state high profile Performing Arts High Schools. Goals are to engage and connect with Performing Arts High Schools and create opportunities for faculty visits, workshops, and special events for High School students and faculty to attend. Also students should expect to communicate and connect with various area undergraduate performing arts programs. Goals are to create partnerships and possible collaborations with area undergraduate programs.

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Henrika McCoy

Email Address: hmccoy@uic.edu
College: Social Work Department: Jane Addams Social Work
Title: Associate Professor
Office: ETMSW 4034 Phone: 312-413-5027
Webpage: https://socialwork.uic.edu/facultyandstaff/henrika-mccoy/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Child and adolescent mental health, juvenile delinquency, African Americans; violent victimization

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Students must demonstrate an interest in research applicable to economically disadvantaged families, child and adolescent mental health, juvenile delinquency, violence and victimization, social work and/or psychology. Computer literacy is a must. In addition, coursework in advanced psychology courses are strongly recommended, but not required; data entry and statistical analysis experience is a plus. Students must be honest and have integrity; be able to work independently; have good attention to detail; and be reliable and responsible. Students may be required to submit a writing sample and provide reference information from a current or former professor.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The majority, if not all time, will be spent helping to produce findings from an NIJ funded project, SURVIVE. Project information an be found here, http://www.srl.uic.edu/survive/index.htm

General research tasks including assisting with data cleaning and entry; literature reviews; participating as a member of a research team; assisting in writing manuscripts for submission to different journal articles. If something is used in the final manuscript that was written by a student then the student will receive credit for his/her work by having their name listed as one of the contributing authors. In addition to assisting with manuscript submissions, students might assist in the writing of grant proposals. Furthermore, students can also expect to possibly work on powerpoints for presentation at national conferences and or co-present at such conferences, convert current documents to other forms such as white papers, website content, brochures, etc. Completion of IRB training required. Ten hours is required.

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Zachary J McDowell

Email Address: zjm@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Communication
Title: Assistant Professor
Phone: 4134555493
Webpage: www.zachmcdowell.com
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am interested in questions related to how technological mediation structures cultural production. I believe strongly in the importance of embodied practice and my scholarly interests around collaborative communities bridges the theoretical and the practical. My range of digital media interests run the technological gamut from gaming studies, to surveillance, to digital culture, information policy, data-representations, and emerging media trends. My work brings together a core thread around engaged, community-based and transformative practices in the digital age, focusing on questions of access and agency.

Currently I am focusing on researching information literacy and Wikipedia, algorithmic discrimination and issues with labor and automation, and the role of social robots in spreading disinformation.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Honors college, communication major

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Participation in, and collaboration in research.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Barbara McFarlin

Email Address: bmcfar1@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Women, Child, and Family Health Sciences
Title: Associate Professor and Department Head
Office: 806, College of Nursing, MC 802 Phone: 6-0516
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Dr. McFarlin's program of research seeks to find noninvasive methods to determine risk for preterm birth. Her research has focused on an ultrasound method to detect cervical microstructural tissue changes leading to preterm birth long before a woman would have contractions, cervical shortening or ruptured membranes. Dr McFarlin first developed this method in studies of the pregnant rat cervix through her collaboration with engineers. She has translated these ultrasound methods for use in human pregnancy. In women destined for preterm birth, she was able to detect cervical changes already at 20 weeks of pregnancy. This technology could have a major impact on the incidence of preterm birth by identifying women who need intervention and monitoring interventions on a tissue level.

Dr. McFarlin, in collaboration with mechanical, civil and material sciences engineers, is studying new technologies (second harmonic imaging, elastography, nanoindention) to furhter understand the process of cervical remodeling in pregnancy. Furthermore, her team is working on methods (finite element modeling and tissue engineering) to model cervical remodeling in humans without using human cervical tissue biopsies.

Current Research Projects:

"Multi-Omics approach toward identification of metabolic biomarkers of vaginal microbiome."
“Pathways to Preterm Birth: Stress, Inflammation, & Cervical Remodeling”.
"Application of Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation imaging to the rat cervix."
"System-level biomechanical approach for the evaluation of term and preterm pregnancy maintenance."
"Prediction of pelvic prolapse with ultrasonic attenuation."

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Engineering, bioengineering, nursing medicine
Knowledge of Matlab is a plus

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
To work on research projects. Many opportunities available from data collection, learning ultrasound, data analysis, data processing.

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Paul-Brian McInerney

Email Address: pbm@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Sociology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4140B BSB Phone: 773-526-0903
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~pbm
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Economic sociology, organizational sociology.

This project takes a mixed-methods approach to examine the relationship between interorganizational collaboration and valuation in the craft brewing industry. The quantitative component of this project will create and analyze a dataset of collaborations between craft brewers in three states: California, Illinois, and Colorado. I will examine craft brewing across three states as a way of accounting for the institutional contexts that advance or hamper network arrangements. This dataset will be used to model networks of collaboration among brewers in the states in question. It will also be used to test hypotheses about the role of valuation as a network structuring mechanism in the industry. The qualitative component of this project will describe the motivations craft brewers give for participating in these collaborative arrangements, including how they choose partners. The resultant project will establish and explain the relationship between micro-level organizational processes, e.g., motivations and decision making, and meso-level dynamics, e.g., interorganizational networks that represent the structure of an industry.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Preferably sociology major or cognate field. Preferably junior year or later.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Responsibilities include:
• Hand collecting and coding data about craft breweries
• Checking data
• Contacting sampled craft brewers to arrange qualitative interviews
• Reviewing transcriptions for accuracy
• Data management
• Conducting literature searches

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Cassandra L. McKay-Jackson

Email Address: cmckay@uic.edu
College: Social Work Department: Education
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4204 Phone: 5-2280
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Social construction of race; Critical service learning; Positive risk-taking and youth activism; Social and emotional learning.

I have a broad background in social work and education, and primarily teach in the school social work concentration at JACSW integrating an interdisciplinary perspective. The practice of school social work is located within an educational context; hence an interdisciplinary perspective is critical at the practice, research and curricular levels.

My scholarship focuses on the use of critical service learning and youth activism that support the resilience, efficacy and engagement of learners who are marginalized due to race, ability, gender, or age, and further advances the national standards of social work practice with adolescents by promoting their empowerment. I have conducted research in school and out -of- school settings. I teach the practice sequence within the school social work concentration, and have utilized the classroom as a laboratory to explore how social work interns can implement critical service learning as an intervention within school settings. I also teach the research seminar within the school social work concentration which supports data collection, analysis and integration of evidence informed interventions in school social work practice.
In addition, my interdisciplinary work promotes the collaborative work of pre-service teachers and school social workers in addressing how the social construction of race and class impact social emotional learning in urban school settings.
Finally, I am the co-founder of the Training Institute for School Social Work Professionals, which provides training to current school social workers within the state of Illinois and beyond, and also explores the impact of training on the sustainable improvement of social work practice delivery in schools.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 8

Qualifications of a Student:
You should be eager to learn new skills, mature, flexible, hard working, committed (able to follow through and complete assigned tasks in a timely manner), have good writing skills (or be willing to improve them) and interested in pursuing a career in social work, psychology, education, or a related discipline. You’ll also need to have earned at least a 3.0 GPA in your last semester at UIC.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You should expect to become familiar with SPSS procedures (entering data, cleaning data, running simple analysis). Also you will search and summarize literature relevant to research projects, file materials, transcribe and code transcripts from project sessions, interviews, trainings etc. You may be able to facilitate focus groups as well, depending upon your assessed skill level with group facilitation. Overall, this experience will allow you to understand elements of behavioral research and perhaps help you to decide if you would like to pursue a career in social work as a practitioner, researcher, or even a policy maker.

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Evan McKenzie

Email Address: mckenzie@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Political Science
Title: Associate Professor
Office: BSB 1122D Phone: 312-413-3782
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/pols/faculty/evanmckenzie.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Urban politics and policy
Suburban politics and policy
privatization
housing policy
condominium and homeowner association law and policy

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
3.0 GPA; junior or senior; political science, urban studies, urban planning, urban history, sociology coursework preferred; familiarity with Oak Park preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
To assist me in a project concerning Oak Park's policies and practices in housing, education, and criminal justice.

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Timothy McMahon

Email Address: timomcma@UIC.EDU
College: Medicine Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences
Office: 3.164 EEI M/C 648 Phone: 9965410
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/com/eye/Department/FullTimeFaculty/McMahon_Timothy.shtml

Research Interest:
Corneal topography. - Corneal topography is the mapping of shape, curvature, and height of the cornea. Research interests include understanding the characteristics and changes that occur with various corneal disorders, refractive surgery, and with contact lens wear.

Contact lenses - Research interests include studies of new and novel contact lens designs prior to marketing in the US as well as comparative performance studies.

Keratoconus - Interest includes understanding the biochemical nature of this corneal disorder, characterizing the clinical course and determining whether and how heredity may play a role.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Sophomore, junior or senior standing; Basic knowledge of biostatistics would be valuable

For topography study - good grasp of computer technology and programming skills would be useful

For biochemical study - basic knowledge of inorganic, organic and biochemistry

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Michael McNallan

Email Address: mcnallan@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Civil and Materials Engineering
Office: 3083 ERF M/C 246 Phone: 9962436

Research Interest:
Corrosion and processing of materials at high temperatures

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, chemistry or physics major

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Cammeo R Medici

Email Address: cmedic2@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Emergency Medicine
Title: Visiting Research Specialist
Office: CME 471H Phone: 312-413-7482
Webpage: http://projectheal.uic.edu/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Our research interests focus on the following topics:
Routine opt-out HIV screening, HIV screening best practices, linkage to care and retention in care for HIV positive patients,4th generation HIV tests and testing algorithms, HIV screening in emergency departments, utilization of electronic medical record codes, rules, and prompts to improve preventive health services, other HIV/AIDS testing and treatment topics, Hepatitis C screening, HCV linkage to care and treatment, quality improvement and patient outcomes monitoring.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Student should have at least a 3.5gpa.

Preference given to students meeting any/all of the following criteria:
-Honors college student
-Major in public health, health sciences, or pre-med majors
-Junior or Senior in college
-Prior experience conducting literature reviews and/or writing abstracts and manuscripts

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Project HEAL (HIV & HCV Screening, Education, Awareness, and Linkage to care) is seeking the assistance of a student to conduct literature reviews on a range of topics, including routine opt-out HIV screening, HIV screening best practices, linkage to care and retention in care for HIV positive patients, 4th generation HIV tests, HIV screening in emergency departments, and more.
Student will help to build a small database of literature and evidence, which we can use to help inform our program decisions as we roll out routine HIV testing in our hospital and to help provide support and references for future publications.
Student will research appropriate conferences and journals to which Project HEAL will submit abstracts, posters, and presentations.
Student will help contribute to the writing of abstracts and manuscripts.
Student will ideally commit at least 10-20 hrs/week. Depending on the effort and motivation of the student, there is potential for publications.

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Constantine M. Megaridis

Email Address: cmm@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Title: Professor and Laboratory Director
Office: 3035 ERF M/C 251 Phone: 996 3436
Webpage: http://www.mie.uic.edu/MIE/ProfileMegaridis
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Nanotechnology; Nanomaterials; Liquid Repellent Coatings; Materials Engineering; Microfluidics; Lab on a Chip

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing; Highly motivated; Minimum GPA 3.5 or close to it; Major in Mechanical, Chemical, Materials Engineering or Applied Physics; Desire to be involved in world-class experimental work; Team working skills

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Good work habbits; will work closely with graduate students who pursue their PhD degree on externally funded (federal government and industry) research. Most students who have been involved in this program have gone on to pursue graduate degrees.

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Shafigh Mehraeen

Email Address: tranzabi@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Secondary Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 810 S Clinton St, Chicago, IL 60607 Phone: 312-996-8734
Webpage: https://tranzabi.people.uic.edu
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, charge transport in solar cells, scanning electrochemical microscopy, nanoparticles self-assembly, drug delivery, complex fluids, computational materials science, computational simulations and modeling.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
1) minimum GPA: 3.00.
2) preferred major: materials science and engineering, mechanical engineerig, chemical engineering, computer science, physics, chemistry.
3) knowing MATLAB, and C++ programming is preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Depending on the project, the student will get involved in
1) developing theoretical models,
2) performing computational simulations,
3) comparing simulation results with experimental data,
4) preparing reports and manuscripts.

During the course of the research, the student will work in a team together with other undergraduate and graduate students in the lab.

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Rajendra Mehta

Email Address: raju@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Surgical Oncology
Office: 618 CSB M/C 820 Phone: 4131156

Research Interest:
Cancer chemoprevention; Mechanism of action of vitamin D and other cancer preventive agents in breast cancer, melanoma, and colon cancer

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing; Major in biology, biochemistry, or chemistry; GPPA or pre-medicine curriculum preferred

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Tara Mehta

Email Address: tmehta@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: West Side Research Building, 313 Phone: 312-996-3910
Webpage: http://www.psych.uic.edu/ijr/facultymember.asp?p=tmehta
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I collaborate with a team of Mental Health Services Researchers focused on examining models of mental health service delivery for underserved populations and the mechanisms by which evidence based services can be effectively implemented and supported. Specifically, my research is focuesd on two areas:

(1) how to best support mental health staff provide high quality services to support children's mental health in community settings;
(2) how mental health providers can be integrated into natural settings to suport healthy development where children spend their time, such as school and after-school settings.

My work is focused in community mental health centers and school and after-school settings. Current projects include interviewing school-based mental health providers to identify factors that facilitate and impede effective school based mental health services.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
I am interested in working with students who want to gain expereince with mental health services research. Students should be highly motivated, able to organize multiple tasks, and self-directed.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students can expect to work with a team of undergraduate students, graduate students, research assistants, and posdoctoral fellows. Undergraduate students participant in all aspects of mental health services research. This includes data collection, data entry and management. Our projects often have opportunities for field based experiences. Please contact me to inquire as to the opportunities on specific projects.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Edward K Mensah

Email Address: dehasnem@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Health Policy Administration
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 757 SPHPI M/C 923 Phone: 9963001
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Health Economics
Information Economics and Policy
Health informatics

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of course in Intermediate Microeconomics
Statistics or Econometrics course important but not necessary

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Literature review, data management, some statistical analysis

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Robin J Mermelstein

Email Address: robinm@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Psychology
Secondary Department: Institute of Health Research and Policy
Title: Professor/Director
Office: M/C Phone: 9961469

Research Interest:
Health behaviors of adolescents; understanding how adolescents develop health promoting and health-compromising habits; understanding psychosocial factors relating to health

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Strong interest in research; research methods classes; sophomore or higher

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Brad J J Merrill

Email Address: merrillb@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Title: Associate Professor
Office: MBRB2270 Phone: 60346
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Genome editing, Genome Engineering, Developmental Biology, Stem Cell Research.

Currently we are looking for someone who will provide assistance with the Genome Editing Core facility.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
Biology major is preferred.
Preference for honors college student.
Previous research experience would be helpful, but is not necessary.
Minimum GPA of 3.75

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student needs to be dependable and hard working. Must be willing and capable of both accepting training and working independently as needed to complete projects.

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Chris Messenger

Email Address: chrism1@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Title: Professor of English
Office: 1920 UH M/C 162 Phone: 4132227
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Sentimentalism in literature and American culture, specifically 20th century; Long term research projects on F. Scott Fitzgerald (well under way) and E. L. Doctorow (beginning stages).

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: flexible

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or senior standing; English major; research skills and reading background in 20th century American fiction. Must already be familiar with several works of Fitzgerald and/or Doctorow. Would much prefer a student who has already studied one or both of these writers with me in a class.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
In the case of Fitzgerald, working with the TENDER IS THE NIGHT manuscripts. In the case of Doctorow, working up a directed preliminary bibliography and source materials.

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Vitali Metlushko

Email Address: vmetlush@ece.uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Office: 3011 ERF M/C 154 Phone: 4137574
Webpage: http://www.ece.uic.edu/Faculty/metlushko.html

Research Interest:
Advanced recording media, new magnetic materials and nano-technology

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Matthew John Metzger

Email Address: matmetz@uic.edu
College: Architecture and the Arts Department: Art and Design
Secondary Department: Art History
Title: Assistant Professor of Studio Arts
Phone: 312-388-1904
Webpage: http://shifter-magazine.com/about
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Faculty member is the co-Editor of SHIFTER, a topical publication that aims to illuminate and broaden our understanding of the intersections between contemporary art, politics and philosophy. SHIFTER remains malleable and responsive in its form and activities, and represents a diversity of positions and backgrounds in its contributors. Possible research interests are in the fields of Art, Art History, Philosophy, Politics, Color Theory, Education, Social Work, Design, Architecture, & Literature.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Student must be a sophomore or above and be currently maintaining a minimum GPA of 3.2. Honors college student preferred but not required. STudent must be well versed in the English language including its grammar and style. STudent must be very comfortable with Microsoft word. Student must also be punctual, focused, invested, and organized. There are no pre-requisit classes necessary although student must provide a writing sample. Preferred majors: English Lit., Creative Writing, Comparative Lit., Linguistics, Art, Art History, Philosophy, Politics, & Women's Studies.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Student is expected to copy edit scholarly publication material for grammar and style. Student will craft paragraphs which briefly summarize and clarify research interests of SHIFTER. Student will research grant opportunities, research topical writings around SHIFTER themes, and will maintain important website updates regarding contributor information and event announcements.

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D'Arcy Meyer-Dombard

Email Address: drmd@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Earth and Environmental Sciences
Secondary Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor

Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/geos/people/d_dombard_research.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Geomicrobiology
Astrobiology
Ecology of Extreme Environments
Carbon and nutrient cycling

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
No minimum GPA, but only serious students please.
Classes in Biology, Chemistry, and Earth Sciences will be beneficial. Some lab experience preferred [in-class experience is OK].
EaES and Biology majors preferred.
Honors College Students are welcomed.
Freshmen and Sophomores encouraged, with the preference for a long-term commitment to the lab. Lab manager position available.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Specific expectations will vary depending on the role of the student. Students in self-driven research roles are expected to understand that their projects will be central to the activities of the lab, and that serious attention to the project is required.

In general, I expect students to be in the lab for the minimum number of hours. I expect students to arrive "on time", giving advance notice for absences.

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Mohammed R Milad

Email Address: milad@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Psychiatry
Title: Professor
Office: IJR-253 Phone: 312-355-4001
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
I am a neuroscientist interested in the neurobiology of emotional learning and memory. Specifically, I am interested in understanding how does the brain learns not to fear, and what are the neural networks and circuits that mediate fear learning and its subsequent fear extinction. My lab uses classical fear conditioning paradigm in humans to study how we acquire conditioned fear and how do we extinguish it. We study these systems also in patients with anxiety and fear disorders, like PTSD. We use psychophysiological measures and functional MRI as experimental tools. Another aspect of our research is focused on sex differences and the influence of the menstrual cycle in females on the fear learning and emotion regulation, and how fluctuations of estrogens in women could influence the neural correlates of fear extinction.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Some basic knowledge of psychology, neuroscience would be great. Key qualifications include serious commitment and eagerness to learn.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students would be offered to shadow research assistants and post-doctoral fellows to learn how to conduct human research. The students would be able to learn how to collect and analyze some basic psychophysiological data and will help in the organization of some data and IRB related documentations for the study

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Mansha Parven Mirza

Email Address: mmirza2@uic.edu
College: Applied Health Sciences Department: Occupational Therapy
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 346 AHSB Phone: 55427
Webpage: http://www.ahs.uic.edu/ot/facultyresearch/profiles/name,10050,en.html
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Broad Research Interests:

Various aspects of immigrant health, refugee health and global health
Civic engagement with immigrants and people with disabilities
Community based participatory research



Specific Current Research Focus:
Healthcare access and service disparities for people with disabilities and chronic health conditions in refugee communities.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
2.50 gpa or higher
Prior experience in research preferred
Certification in human subjects research ethics required through UIC's institutional review board
Experience working with ethnic minority groups preferred

Preferred majors: anthropology, psychology, pre-occupational therapy, information and decision sciences

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Tasks will depend on the student's background and prior experiences and could include:
1. developing data collections instruments
2. assisting with data collection procedures such as focus groups
3. database development
4. day-to-day grant operations

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Mulubrhan F Mogos

Email Address: mmogos@uic.edu
College: Nursing Department: Women, Child, and Family Health Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 860 Phone: 3129965801
Webpage: http://www.nursing.uic.edu/faculty-staff/mulubrhan-mogos-phd-msc
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My global research interest focuses on examining the impact of pregnancy-related conditions on pregnancy and birth outcomes. Specifically, I am interested in exploring risk factors, disparities, and the short term and long term consequences of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) on maternal and fetal birth outcomes.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 3

Qualifications of a Student:
Qualifications:
1. GPA >=3.00
2. Preferred major in health sciences (nursing, public health, medicine)
3. At least one course in research and/or statistics
3. Experience in systematic literature search preferred

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Expectations:
1. Interest in the area of maternal and child health is essential.
2. If not already familiar with the process of conducting a systematic literature search, student should be willing to acquire skills needed(I will provide guidance and resources).
3. Ability to organize literature systematically (help and guidance available)

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Mary Anne Mohanraj

Email Address: mohanraj@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: English
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Office: UH 1915 Phone: 413-7593
Webpage: http://www.mamohanraj.com
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My current project is an oral history collection of individual experiences of the Sri Lankan diaspora, in part related to the Tamil / Sinhalese ethnic conflict. We are in the very early stages of development now; putting together a set of interview questions which we plan to use for audio / video / written interviews, which will eventually be gathered into a web-based archive and an edited anthology.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA 3.0. Preferred Major: English and/or History and/or Sociology and/or Asian American Studies Minor. Honors College student preferred. Junior or Senior preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Some guided reading of Sri Lankan history and political material, to ensure familiarity with the political issues, followed by development of interview questions and conducting actual interviews. Interviews will be local initially, but if funds permit, will likely involve travel within the U.S., and possibly to Toronto in 2014-2015.

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Justin T Mohr

Email Address: jtmohr@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Chemistry
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 5124 SES Phone: 5-0242
Webpage: http://www2.chem.uic.edu/mohr/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Synthetic organic chemistry, catalysis, natural products, new reaction discovery, organometallics

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Prerequisites courses: Chem 232 & 233. Chem 234 preferred.

Priority is given to Chemistry and Biochemistry majors and Honors College students. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are welcome; no prior research experience required. Students who will commit to research over multiple semesters are preferred.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will conduct supervised laboratory research in our lab. Students will learn skills including strategic synthetic planning, executing synthetic procedures, purification, analytical data collection, and interpretation of data. Since progress in synthetic chemistry is dependent on physical progress in the lab, a significant time investment is required. Students are expected to participate in weekly group meetings discussing research progress. Students will be encouraged to present their results at conferences and journal publications.

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Yamile Molina

Email Address: ymolin2@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Community Health Sciences
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 649 Phone: 312-355-2679
Webpage: https://crwg.uic.edu/crwg-home/crwg-staff/5368-2/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Molina's research interests concern protective factors of health and well-being, with a focus on breast cancer and HIV/AIDS. Toward that end, Dr. Molina's work in these conditions assesses the roles of intrapersonal (e.g., self-efficacy), interpersonal (e.g., social support), and contextual factors (e.g., policy, social capital).

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Students should be willing to commit to 2 years of work within this lab. Students should a minimum of 3 months of previous experience in social sciences and health research. They should have completed CITI and HIPAA training prior to contacting Dr. Molina.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will be expected to engage in the following activities: 1) take meeting notes; 2) travel to meetings with various types of stakeholders; 3) conduct literature searches; 4) engage in administrative research duties (e.g., IRB); 5) enter/transcribe data; 6) conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analyses under the auspices of Dr. Molina; and 7) help with manuscript/grant preparation. Students will also be expected to develop an ancillary project, which will be a vehicle for abstract submissions to local, regional, and national conferences.

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Alan J Molumby

Email Address: molumby@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Clinical Assistant Professor
Office: 4676 SES M/C 066 Phone: 9965861
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Research Interest:
Entomology and natural history. I am director of the James Woodworth Prairie, in Glenview IL, and my research is very entomology (and maybe soon, ichthyology) focused, and natural history centered. Most of the opportunities I can provide are during the summer, but I would be happy to have students learn basic ecosystems management techniques, basic entomology, and conduct natural history observations.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
MUST have an interest in natural history that goes beyond a desire to accumulate an experience for a resume. For example, if the student's career path is focused on pre-health professions, an interest in medical entomology, or the entomology of decomposition related to pathology, is desired. A student must genuinely enjoy diptera, for example, aesthetically and as a research experience.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
A student should be able to learn to identify plants, animals, and other organisms, and to recognize the community interactions they drive, in a natural or human-impacted environment.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Terry Moore

Email Address: twmoore@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 504 PHARM Phone: 312-413-1846
Webpage: http://moorelab.publish.uic.edu/
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We are looking for one undergraduate student to assist in synthesizing non-natural methylated amino acids using organic chemistry techniques.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.6
Prerequisite classes: Organic chemistry
Preferred majors: chemistry, biochemistry, pre-health related occupations, etc. Students interested in applying to graduate school for medicinal chemistry programs are particularly encouraged to apply.
Prior experience not necessary

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students are expected to work alongside graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to the learn practical aspects of organic and medicinal chemistry. This includes devising and planning synthetic routes; setting up, monitoring, and working up reactions; purifying crude product mixtures; characterizing compounds by modern spectroscopic and spectrometric methods; and keeping detailed records of your experiments and data. We place a particular emphasis on maintaining a safe working environment for everyone in the lab, and adhering to safe working practices will be strictly enforced.

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P. Zitlali Morales

Email Address: zitlali@uic.edu
College: Education Department: Curriculum and Instruction
Secondary Department: Latin American and Latino Studies
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 3234 Phone: 3129968144
Webpage: http://education.uic.edu/personnel/faculty/p-zitlali-morales-phd
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Dr. Morales examines the language practices of Latin@ youth and linguistic interactions of students and teachers in bilingual classrooms. She views language acquisition from a sociocultural perspective as participants learning to use language through the use of cultural practices, and specializes in additive models of language acquisition for emergent bilinguals. Her current research focuses on preparing teachers to meet their multilingual students' needs by leveraging the language and cultural knowledge that students bring to the classroom. Other research projects include exploring the learner identities of linguistic minority students in Spanish-English dual immersion programs and studying how language ideologies affect the context of schooling for immigrant students and multilingual learners. Dr. Morales is co-PI of a National Science Foundation funded project, “Literacy and New Communication Technologies in Contexts of Transnational Migration” studying the digital literacy practices and transnational ties of immigrant youth. She is affiliated faculty of the Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS) program at UIC.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 2

Qualifications of a Student:
Proficiency in Spanish desirable but not required
Work would be most interesting for students interested in pursuing majors in education, anthropology, Latin American and Latino Studies, or sociolinguistics

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Transcribing audiorecorded interviews

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Gerardo A Morfini

Email Address: gmorfini@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Title: Associate Profesor
Office: COMRB 7053 Phone: 312-996-6869
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The unique ability of neurons to receive, process, and transmit information depends upon the organized distribution of cellular organelles at discrete subcellular compartments (i.e., axons and dendrites). Such distribution in turn depends upon intracellular trafficking events collectively referred to as axonal transport (AT), which are carried by molecular motor proteins. An illumination of molecular mechanisms regulating axonal transport is critical for a comprehensive understanding of neuronal function.

Within this context above, our studies over the last years identified specific signaling pathways that regulate AT through phosphorylation of motor proteins. Significantly, genetic evidence revealed that alterations in AT may play a critical role in various human neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Based on these observations, our current research aims to evaluate the contribution of specific protein kinases to the progressive loss of neuronal connectivity that characterizes these diseases. Knowledge derived from this work will provide a conceptual framework for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases based on preservation of neuronal connectivity.

Selected publications

1. Gatto et al (2015). Analysis of YFP(J16)-R6/2 reporter mice and postmortem brains reveals early pathology and increased vulnerability of callosal axons in Huntington's disease. Hum Mol Genet. 24(18):5285-98.

2. Morfini et al (2013). Inhibition Of Fast Axonal Transport By Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of P38 MAP Kinase. PLOS One 8(6):e65235.

3. Kanaan et al (2011) Pathogenic Forms of Tau Inhibit Kinesin-Dependent Axonal Transport Through a Mechanism Involving Activation of Axonal Phosphotransferases. J. Neurosci. 31(27):9858-68.

4. Bosco et al (2010) Wild-type and mutant SOD1 share an aberrant conformation and a common pathogenic pathway in ALS. Nat. Neurosci. 13(11):1396-403.

5. Pigino, et al. (2009) Disruption of fast axonal transport is a pathogenic mechanism for intraneuronal amyloid beta. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 106, 5907-5912.

6. Morfini et al (2009) Axonal transport defects in neurodegenerative diseases. J. Neurosci. 29, 12776-12786.

7. Morfini et al (2009) Pathogenic huntingtin inhibits fast axonal transport by activating JNK3 and phosphorylating kinesin. Nat. Neurosci. 12, 864-871.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 15

Qualifications of a Student:
Priority is given primarily to Biology/Chemistry majors with top GPAs (>3.5), which have taken a course in at least one and preferably two of the following areas: neuroscience, cell biology, biochemistry or molecular biology.
Sophomores pursuing Medical/Graduate school are encouraged to apply. Prior research experience is an advantage but not necessary. Applicant should have excellent communication and team-work skills, be mature, organized and reliable.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student should be willing to make a sustained commitment with a regular schedule during the school year. Summer research options are only available to students that have been involved during the academic year. Students interested in a multiyear experience are preferred .Lab time is expected to be devoted to lab activities only. Students should expect to start a training period where they will be under the supervision of a senior lab member to learn general lab duties and techniques. After this period and with evidence of gained precision, commitment and trouble-shooting skills, students are expected to become fully embedded in a particular project under the direction of a project leader.

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Kara Morgan Morgan-Short

Email Address: karams@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Hispanic and Italian Studies
Secondary Department: Psychology
Title: Cognition of Second Language Acquisition
Office: UH 1704 Phone: 312-996-2278
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/ling/COGSLA%20Lab/cogsla_home.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
The primary aim of Dr. Morgan-Short's research is to elucidate the neurocognitive processes underlying late-learned second language acquisition and use. Informed by the fields of linguistics, cognitive psychology and neuroscience, the research conducted in the Cognition of Second Language Acquisition lab explores the effects of explicit (classroom-like provision of rules) and implicit (immersion-like provision of meaningful examples) training conditions on adult second language acquisition and processing. In addition, the research considers whether the effects of explicit and implicit training are moderated by the linguistic form being acquired (e.g., vocabulary, aspects of grammar), by learners� level of proficiency (e.g., low, intermediate, high), or by learners� individual cognitive abilities (e.g., working memory). We use both behavioral (e.g., accuracy on spoken language tasks), electrophysiological (event-related potentials, ERPs) and brain imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI) data to provide evidence regarding how these factors may interact and lead to different patterns in second language comprehension and production.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 9 hours

Qualifications of a Student:
Minimum GPA: 3.0

Preferred GPA: >3.5

Preferred majors: Spanish, Psychology or Neuroscience

Preferred year in college: Sophomore or Junior

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students are expected to have a strong interest in language acquisition. Students are also expected to be extremely reliable.

Students will have the opportunity to be involved in all aspects of research. Initially, students will be responsible for tasks such as scheduling and screening potential participants and data entry and processing. Once the student gains some experience, they will be trained to run participants and will be involved in some data analysis.

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Donald A Morrison

Email Address: damorris@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Professor
Office: 4102 MBRB M/C 567 Phone: 9966839
Webpage: https://bios.uic.edu/bios/people/faculty/don-morrison
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
We are now open for a sophomore interested in continuing lab project on bacterial gene exchange. As our web site indicates, we are discovering pneumococcal genes and their activities. For more info, a Google Scholar search for "Streptococcus Morrison" will retrieve the work of many past UIC students in our lab.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 20

Qualifications of a Student:
Training in microbiology, or genetics. Interest in scientific research. Multisemester availability

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
We are now open for a sophomore interested in continuing lab project on bacterial gene exchange. As our web site indicates, we are discovering pneumococcal genes and their activities. For more info, a Google Scholar search for "Streptococcus Morrison" will retrieve the work of many past UIC students in our lab.

THis spring, the student will observe, learn the ropes, and read background on our project.

An application for URE financial support should be eubmiited as soon as possible.

Starting summer semester, s/he will run a semi-independent project, continuing through 3 more semesters, including presentations at national microbiology meetings,and ending in a Capstone report.

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Norma Claire Moruzzi

Email Address: nmoruzzi@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Gender and Women's Studies
Secondary Department: Political Science
Title: Gender and Women's Studies
Office: 1122A BSB, MC 276 Phone: 6-2794
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: No

Research Interest:
Political Theory; Feminist Theory; Gender & Politics;
Middle East, particularly Iran;
Cinema Studies;
Urban Social Geographies

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Farah Movahedzadeh

Email Address: movahed@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Tuberculosis Research/Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Secondary Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Title: Research Assistant Professor
Office: 319 Phone: 6-5233
Webpage: http://www.tuberculosisdrugresearch.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=79&Itemid=99
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Protein expression, Protein purification and
drug discovery

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10-20

Qualifications of a Student:
Major in Biochemistry or Biology

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Students will learn basic techniques to apply for the research project. I am looking for a candidate who desire to work in my laboratory for more than one semester.

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Robert Mrtek

Email Address: mrtek@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Medical Education
Title: Professor (retired)
Office: 964 CME M/C 591 Phone: 9967898
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: No

Research Interest:

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

NOTE: This researcher is currently not accepting applications for the Undergraduate Research Experience program.




Sohail Murad

Email Address: murad@uic.edu
College: Engineering Department: Chemical Engineering
Title: Professor
Office: 206 CEB Phone: 312-996-5593
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/cemsl/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Develop and design alternate energy solutions for a range of applications. Some of these include: geothermal energy for heating and cooling,solar heating (water heaters, etc).


In addition we have projects related to developing inexpensive technologies for treating sea water and contaminated water especially geared towards third world countries. We are currently working on solar desalination and portable electro-dionization systems.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
Junior or Senior status in an engineering of physical sciences discipline.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Work with faculty, postdoctoral associates and graduate students on designing and building these units in our research laboratories. There is a possibility of working full time on these projects as paid interns in the summer

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Michael Murakami

Email Address: murakamm@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Political Science
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: BSB 1122B Phone: 6-5156
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
American Politics, Political Psychology, Campaigns and Elections, Public Opinion, Parties, Race & Ethnic Politics, and Congress.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 5

Qualifications of a Student:
A qualified student should have a GPA of 3.0 or above. Coursework in American politics or an interest in/knowledge of American public opinion, elections, and/or Congress is also required.

A major (or prospective major) in sociology, psychology, political science, statistics, or related/similar fields is preferred, but not required.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
Assist the Professor in conducting research on a variety of projects concerning American Politics. This includes conducting secondary research, gathering data, and conducting analysis, and writing up & editing results/findings.

The tasks assigned to research assistants will be commensurate with their abilities and comfort levels.

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Naoko Muramatsu

Email Address: naoko@uic.edu
College: School of Public Health Department: Community Health Sciences
Secondary Department: Sociology
Title: Associate Professor
Office: Rm 556 Institute for Health Research and Policy (1747 W. Roosevelt) Phone: 312-413-0485
Webpage: http://www.ihrp.uic.edu/researcher/naoko-muramatsu-phd
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Health care access, quality of care, long-term care policies, caregiving, health and well being of older adults, home care workforce, cross-cultural studies of health and aging, global aging. The issues I study lie at the intersection of public health, health services research, sociology, and gerontology. My research aims to improve the health of diverse aging populations and the quality of long-term care systems. I conduct community-based interventions as well as survey research, qualitative research (e.g., focus groups), and quantitative analysis of large national datasets. My research is on health and aging, focusing on social, cultural, policy and system factors that shape health and caregiving experience in aging individuals. my team seeks research assistants who want to be involved in all aspects of research including literature review, data entry, conducting surveys, research methods, etc. I am the principal investigator of studies funded by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. I have developed two related lines of research. In the first, I am developing cost-effective, sustainable community-based health promotion programs in partnership with older adults, caregivers, community-based organizations, and multi-disciplinary research teams. In my second line of research, I compare and contrast long-term care policies and key measures of well-being across societies, thereby enhancing our understanding of the policy options available to the United States and other countries.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 6

Qualifications of a Student:
Requirements: My team seeks students who are flexible, knowledgeable, committed, and interested in learning about research in the field of public health.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
You would assist with research that is related to public health, health care policies and systems, and older adults and their caregivers. You will join an active multidisciplinary research team with other undergraduate and graduate research assistants under my supervision. You'll be expected to participate in various aspects of the work and to attend weekly research meetings. The work involves helping to prepare materials for health promotion interventions for older adults and their caregivers, data entry using an on-line data capturing system, verifying data that has been entered, literature searching, filing data, following up with research participants, etc. You will receive training for all the tasks. This experience will allow you to understand what research in public health is all about, and help you decide whether you might like to pursue it later in your career. If research is for you, then this experience will prepare you for graduate school, but even if you aren't interested in graduate school, you will learn many generalizable skills and meet other researchers who can give you valuable advice.

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A. Don Murphy

Email Address: dmurphy@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Biological Sciences
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 4275 SEL M/C 067 Phone: 9968087
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/~dmurphy
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes

Research Interest:
Neurobiological mechanisms underlying rhythmic behaviors (e.g. feeding, locomotion, etc). We exploit the nervous systems of gastropod mollusks to define the specific neural circuits mediating feeding behaviors. Comparative studies provide a basis for ascertaining how defined neural circuits may evolve along with changes in the behaviors that they underlie. Techniques include electrophysiology, neuronal staining by dye injection or immunocytochemistry, neuropharmacology, and behavioral analysis.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
Completion of one course in biology; Genuine interest in research

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Brian Thatcher Murphy

Email Address: btmurphy@uic.edu
College: Pharmacy Department: Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: 3120 MBRB Phone: 312-413-9057
Webpage: https://www.murphylabuic.com/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Small molecules produced by actinomycete bacteria have been essential components of antibacterial drug discovery, providing us with greater than half of the antibiotics used in the clinic. However, the discovery of new drug leads is being outpaced by the development of antibiotic resistance to current medicines. In my lab, we have built a collection of aquatic bacteria and are using them to generate small molecule drug-leads for infectious diseases, viruses and cancers. Visit our website for more information!

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
Biological science majors only (biology, chemistry, etc). Must be enrolled in, or have taken (and enjoyed) organic chemistry.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The majority of the research will involve basic microbiological techniques (bacterial isolation and fermentation, purity assessment, etc). Student will be frequently working with marine samples under sterile conditions.

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Timothy Murphy

Email Address: tmurphy@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Medical Education
Title: Professor of Philosophy in the Biomedical Sciences
Office: 973 CME M/C Phone: 312 996 3595

Research Interest:
Please note: I will be on sabbatical for the Spring Term 2011 and not available for student projects during that time.

I have two main areas of research.

1. I currently have a book project, Ethics in Military Medicine, which reviews ethical dilemmas faced by medical personnel in the military. The core of the book will be case studies of ethical problems as they have been presented or discussed in the professional literature. The cases involve, for example, conflicts between duties to superiors and the care of patients, dilemmas faced under battlefield conditions, obligations to civilians harmed in the course of warfare, ethical issues in medical eligibility for service, and larger issues of social justice, such as the debate about whether medical participation in the military is ethical or not.

2. My second main area of research is ethical analysis of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs). In this analysis I focus on questions of access and equity in regard to the interventions used to help people have children. For example, who is entitled to use ARTs to have children: single people, married people, women past menopause, homosexual men and women? I study the thresholds at which a technology is 'ready to go'? How do we know when something is safe enough to offer to people in their quest to have children? For example, when would it be okay to offer cloning as a way of having children?

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:
The student should be at least a sophomore and, preferably, have taken an ethics course of some kind. (Someone headed toward medical school would be nice.)

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The primary responsibility consists of finding and discussing materials that fit these two domains of research.

I will meet with the student on a weekly basis to review the materials he or she has uncovered and identify further resources to be reviewed. We will discuss the materials in various ways, so the student will learn along with me about controversies in military medical ethics or assisted reproduction.

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Alexandra Naba

Email Address: anaba@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Physiology and Biophysics
Title: Assistant Professor
Office: COMRB 2035 Phone: 312-355-5417
Webpage: http://nabalab.uic.edu
Participating in the CCTS Center for Clinical and Translational Science
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
My laboratory studies the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in development, health, and disease, with a particular focus on cancer. To do so, we utilize classical molecular, cellular, and developmental biology approaches in combination with cutting-edge proteomics and computational analyses. Our research is conducted on mouse models and cells in culture.

Our ultimate goal is to better understand how the ECM contributes to diseases so that we can exploit it to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Current research opportunities within our group include:
1) Characterization of a novel transgenic mouse lacking a newly identified ECM gene.
2) Characterization of the cellular and molecular functions of a newly identified ECM gene, shown to be important for breast cancer progression.
3) Computational analysis of the extracellular matrix of different tumor types.

The Naba lab is a highly collaborative and dynamic group that strives for scientific excellence, and offers a stimulating and inclusive working environment conducive to learning and professional development.

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 12 during the week.

Qualifications of a Student:
* Preferred majors: Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Bioengineering or Computer Science.

* Minimum GPA: 3.5

* Qualifications:
- Prior lab experience is not required but is a plus.
- Strong willingness to learn new techniques and not be afraid to work with mice.
- Successful candidate must be detail-oriented, hard-working, professional, reliable with good social skills. You will be helping run our lab therefore, your commitment and reliability are extremely important.

Honors College/GPPA students will be given priority.

Students who are motivated and have experience in our lab will become eligible to work half- or full-time during the summer as hourly paid employees.

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
* Time commitment:
We are expecting students to commit to working in the lab ~12 to 15 hours per week (weekdays only) and to be able to be in the lab for periods of 3-5 hours per day and ideally on consecutive days.

While classroom work is the priority, we expect students to be at work promptly and to devote work time to work tasks. Attendance to our weekly lab meeting is mandatory.

>Freshmen or sophomores: We are looking for students who are willing to commit to working in the lab for 3+ years, pending an initial 1-month evaluation period.

> Juniors need prior research experience in specific research areas (in particular, computational biology and experience with interrogation of gene and protein databases, or working with mouse models).

> We are not hiring seniors.

* Training plan:
Initially, you will learn basic lab techniques and assist with routine maintenance of the lab. You will then choose a specific project to work on that is appropriate for your time commitment, skill set, and research interest.

We also expect candidates to enhance their experience by immersing themselves in the scientific background/literature relevant to the lab’s research (you will not only be a pair of hands!). High-performing students may get the chance to present their research at seminars and meetings.

You will meet at least once a month with Dr. Alexandra Naba for a performance review.

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Nadine Naber

Email Address: naber@uic.edu
College: Liberal Arts and Sciences Department: Gender and Women's Studies
Secondary Department: Asian American Studies
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 1216 University Hall Phone: 3550375
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/depts/wsweb/people/faculty/naber/naber.html
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Arab American Studies
Gender and Middle East Studies
Women of Color Feminist Studies
Transnational Feminism
Immigration and Diaspora
Social Movements and Revolution
Militarism and War

Minimum time commitment in hours per week: 10

Qualifications of a Student:
none

Brief Summary of what is expected from the student:
The student will assist in conducting research about Arab American students at UIC. The student will assist in interviews and analysis of research material.

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Yasuko Nakajima

Email Address: yasukon@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology
Office: 559C CME M/C 512 Phone: 9960717

Research Interest:
Studies of ion channels and signal transduction in brain neurons

Minimum time commitment in hours per week:

Qualifications of a Student:

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Toru Nakamura

Email Address: nakamut@uic.edu
College: Medicine Department: Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
Title: Associate Professor
Office: 2202 MBRB M/C 669 Phone: 9961988
Webpage: http://www.uic.edu/labs/nakamura/
Participating in the Chancellor's Undergraduate Research Awards program: Yes
Participating in the Summer Research Opportunities Programs for Undergraduates: Yes

Research Interest:
Our laboratory is interested in understanding how checkpoint and DNA repair proteins contribute to maintenance of telomeres, the natural ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. Proper maintenance of telomeres is crucial for stable inheritance of the genome. Various checkpoint and DNA